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Have you been over those figures ?

Admiral SMITH. We have seen those figures, sir. We do agree that that would be a very useful step.

Mr. BLANDFORD. I can summarize it at the moment. If the subcommittee decided to put a separation allowance in the bill which would permit 2 months' base pay for each year a man was retired short of the 26- and 30-year normal period of service, but also insert a $6,000 limitation on the total amount that any one person could receive, it would involve a grand total of $14,957,273.

Now this is on the assumption that this is a one-shot proposition. And I want to explain that very carefully.

This would apply only to the captain or colonel now serving in that grade who is either twice failed of selection in the Marine Corps or who is selected not to be continued in the continuation board.

It would not apply to a commander who is hereafter promoted to the grade of captain and thereafter not selected for continuation or who is selected to colonel hereafter and then twice fails of selection to brigadier general.

And this same reasoning applies to the commander, that this would apply only to those commanders now serving as commanders who have twice failed of selection or who twice failed of selection while serving as commanders.

It would not apply to any future commanders who are now serving as lieutenant commanders.

The theory is that without this legislation their opportunity to be promoted to the next higher grade would have been greatly reduced and, therefore, it is a strictly one-shot proposition.

You are not changing the rules for those now serving in the grade. You are only changing the rules for those serving below that grade, but in changing the rules you have made it possible for them to be selected where the chances were they might not have been selected.

Mr. HÉBERT. Yes, but the fact that you have the extension to 1970 shows that you need the time, which is going to affect everybody who is now in those ranks.

Mr. BLANDFORD. This would apply to those now in those ranks.

The point, Mr. Hébert, is this. Your present captains and your present colonels have now planned on a 30-year career. Now we are terminating that career with less than 30 years of service, and I believe it is the feeling of the subcommittee that they should receive some form of readjustment pay. The same reasoning applies to the commanders.

On the other hand, a commander today who has not yet been promoted to captain has no right to expect a 30-year career at this point because he hasn't been selected to captain yet.

Mr. HÉBERT. Yes, but the individual who went-I think the calendar date has more to do with it than anything else.

Mr. BLANDFORD. No, it is the grade he is now serving in.

Mr. HÉBERT. I know, but the lieutenant commander and the senior lieutenant and lieutenant (jg.)—they all had this thought.

Mr. BLANDFORD. No, sir; they have no right to expect anything except promotion to the next higher grade with attrition. And if the present attrition rate continues, that is if we do nothing, the attrition rate will be 75 percent. But by passing this law we greatly reduce the attrition rate, thus greatly increasing his chances for promotion.

Now nobody who is today a lieutenant can in all sincerity say to himself, “I know positively I am going to be a lieutenant commander.”

Mr. HÉBERT. Because he can be the victim of attrition by the time he gets to commander.

Mr. BLANDFORD. That is right.
Mr. HÉBERT. He recognizes that.
Mr. BLANDFORD. That is exactly right.

Mr. BATEs. On the other hand, there is always going to be a percentage of them, even though it might be a small percentage. There is always going to be a percentage of those going to the higher ranks.

Mr. BLANDFORD. They are not going to be affected.

Mr. KILDAY. Does this cover everything eliminated from active duty by reason of this law?

Mr. BLANDFORD. Yes, sir. You see, the reason the figure is not very startling is that while there are going to be 1,500 captains eventually eliminated short of their 30 years, there are only 867 who are going to be eliminated while they are now serving as captains, and the same figures go down for commander and colonel.

In other words, the figure of $14,957,000 is spread over a 7-year period. That is what it would cost over a 7-year period. And when you stop and think of the fact that if we don't pass the legislation it is going to cost us $11 million more, you can say in effect that you have brought about as much equity as possible in this situation for a total cost of $3 million. Now that is not a bad figure.

Mr. KILDAY. We will meet tomorrow in executive session to read the bill for amendment. Thank you, gentlemen.

(Whereupon, at 11:55 a.m., the subcommittee adjourned to reconvene at 10 a.m. in executive session on Thursday, February 19, 1959.)

O

A FEB 27

1959

[No. 5)

SUBCOMMITTEE NO. 1 CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 3413, H.R. 3412, AND

H.R. 3323

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES,

SUBCOMMITTEE No. 1, Washington, D.C., Thursday, February 19, 1959. The subcommittee met at 11:45 a.m., Hon. Paul J. Kilday (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.

Mr. Kilday. I might say here that it is proposed to call up three bills that were considered by the subcommittee at the last session, favorably reported by the subcommittee to the full committee, and passed the House on the consent Calendar but never finished in the Senate.

If there is no objection, we would like to consider them on the hearings held last year. (The hearings held last year are as follows:)

SUBCOMMITTEE NO. 2 CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 9299 AND H.R. 9300

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES,

SUBCOMMITTEE No. 2,

Washington, D.C., Thursday, June 26, 1958. The subcommittee met, pursuant to notice, at 10 a.m., Hon. Paul J. Kilday (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding. Mr. KILDAY. The committee will be in order. Mr. KILDAY. We will now take up H.R. 9299 and H.R. 9300. (The bills referred to are as follows :)

"[H.R. 9299, 85th Cong., 1st sess.) “A BILL To authorize the appointment of Philip Ferdinand Lindeman as permanent

colonel of the Regular Army Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That (a), notwithstanding any other provision of law, the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, may appoint in the regular grade of colonel in the Regular Army, Philip Ferdinand Lindeman, a member of the Army Reserve presently serving on active duty in the grade of major general.

"(b) The person appointed under subsection (a) shall, while on the active list, be charged against the authorized strength of the Regular Army in colonels on the active list.

"(c) The person appointed under subsection (a) may not be retired, other than for physical disability, before he has at least twenty years of active service as a commissioned officer as defined by section 3926 of title 10, United States Code.

"(d) The Secretary of the Army may retire the person appointed under subsection (a) after he becomes sixty years of age.

"(e) If the person appointed under subsection (a) is retired under subsection (d), he is entitled to retired pay computed under formula C, section 3991 of title 10, United States Code. 34066—59_No.5--1

(337)

“(f) Under appointment, the name of the person appointed under subsection (a) shall be placed on the Army promotion list existing on the date of his appointment at the foot of the list of colonels of the Regular Army."

"[H.R. 9300, 85th Cong., 1st sess.)

"A BILL To authorize the appointment of Robert Wesley Colglazier, Junior, as permanent

brigadier general of the Regular Army Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That, (a) notwithstanding any other prorision of law, the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, may appoint in the regular grade of brigadier general in the Regular Army, Robert Wesley Colglazier, Junior, a member of the Army Reserve presently serving on active duty in the grade of major general.

“(b) The person appointed under subsection (a) shall, while on the active list, be charged against the authorized strength of the Regular Army in general officers on the active list.

"(c) The person appointed under subsection (a) may not be retired, other than for physical disability, before he becomes sixty years of age.

"(d) The Secretary of the Army may retire the person appointed under subsection (a) after he becomes sixty years of age. The person appointed under subsection (a) may be retired, upon his request, after he becomes sixty years

of age.

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"(e) If the person appointed under subsection (a) is retired under subsection (d) with less than twenty years' active service as a commissioned officer, he is entitled to retired pay computed under formula numbered 3, section 1401 of title 10, United States Code. However, if the person appointed under subsection (a) is retired after he has twenty years of active service as a commissioned officer, as defined by section 3926 of title 10, United States Code, he is entitled to retired pay computed under formula C, section 3991 of title 10, United States Code.

(f) For the purpose of determining the rank and eligibility for promotion of the person appointed under subsection (a), his name shall be placed at the foot of the permanent recommended list for promotion to the grade of brigadier general in the Regular Army existing on the date of enactment of this Act."

Mr. KILDAY. Lt. Gen. J. F. Collins, Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel. Come around, General, and bring with you whomever you please.

General COLLINS. Yes, sir.

Mr. KILDAY. H.R. 9299 authorizes the appointment of Philip Ferdinand Lindeman as a permanent colonel of the Regular Army, and H.R. 9300 authorizes the appointment of Robert Wesley Colglazier, Jr., as permanent brigadier general of the Regular Army.

Lt. Gen. J. F. Collins, Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, is here to support these two measures, and we will consider them together. If approved, we will report them as separate bills on the private calendar.

General Collins, do you have a statement on, first, H.R. 9299, or do you have it on both ?

General COLLINS. I have a combined statement, Mr, Chairman.
Mr. Kilday. Go ahead with your statement the way you have it prepared.

General COLLINS. Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, I am Lt. Gen.
James F. Collins, Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Department of the Army.
The purpose of my presentation is to discuss the Department of the Army's
views regarding H.R. 9299 and H.R. 9300.

The proposed legislation will authorize the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint Maj. Gen. Philip F. Lindeman, a Reserve officer now serving on active duty as a permanent colonel of the Regular Army, and to appoint Maj. Gen. Robert W. Colglazier, Jr., a Reserve officer now serving on active duty, as a permanent brigadier general of the Regular Army.

By way of background, General Lindeman has been a Reserve officer since 1930. He had a distinguished combat record in the Southwest Pacific during World War II and upon his return to active duty in 1951 he was appointed resident Army member of the National Guard and Army Reserve Policy Council. From November 1953 until August 1957 he held a key position as Chief, Army Reserve and ROTC Affairs, and in August 1957 was assigned as commanding general, 8th Infantry Division in Europe, the position he now holds.

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