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(b) by striking out the words "distinguished-service cross," wherever they appear therein and inserting the words "Air Force cross," in place

thereof.. (3) Section 8745 is amended

(a) by amending the catchline to read as follows: "§ 8745. Medal of honor; Air Force cross; distinguished-service medal: dele

gation of power to award"; and (b) by striking out the words “distinguished-service cross," and inserting the words “Air Force cross," in place thereof. (4) Section 8747 is amended

(a) by amending the catchline to read as follows: "f8747. Medal of honor; Air Force cross; distinguished-service cross; distin

guished-service medal; silver star: replacement"; and (b) by inserting the words “Air Force cross,” after the words “medal of honor,". (5) The catchline of section 8748 is amended to read as follows: "8 8748. Medal of honor; Air Force cross; distinguished-service cross; dis

tinguished-service medal; silver star: availability of appropriations". (6) Section 8750 is amended

(a) by amending the catchline to read as follows: "$ 8750. Airman's Medal: award; limitations"; and

(b) by striking out the words "Soldier's Medal” wherever they appear therein and inserting the words “Airman's Medal” in place thereof. (7) The analysis is amended by striking out the following items : "8742. Distinguished-service cross : award. **8744. Medal of honor; distinguished-service cross; distinguished-service medal: limita

tions on award. "8745. Medal of honor; distinguished-service cross ; distinguished-service medal: delegation

of power to award. "8747. Medal of honor; distinguished-service cross; distinguished-service medal; silver

star: replacement. "8748. Medal of honor ; distinguished-service cross; distinguished-service medal; silver

star: availability of appropriations. "9750. Soldier's Medal: award ; limitations." and inserting the following items in place thereof: "8742. Air Force cross : award. "8744. Medal of honor; Air Force cross; distinguished-service medal: limitations on

award. "8745. Medal of honor; Air Force cross ; distinguished-service medal: delegation of power

to award. "8747, Medal of honor; Air Force cross ; distinguished-service cross ; distinguished-service

medal ; silver star : replacement. "8748. Medal of honor; Air Force cross; distinguished-service cross ; distinguished-service

medal: silver star: availability of appropriations. "8750. Airman's Medal : award ; limitations."

SEC. 2. For the purposes of sections 8744(a) and 8750 (b) of title 10, United States Code, a person who was awarded a distinguished-service cross or Soldier's Medal before the date of enactment of this Act shall be treated as if he had not been awarded an Air Force cross or Airman's Medal, as the case may be.

Sec. 3. References that other laws, regulations, and orders make, with respect to the Air Force, to the distinguished-service cross and the Soldier's Medal shall be considered to be made to the Air Force cross and the Airman's Medal, respectively.

Mr. DURHAM. Is there a witness here?
Mr. KELLEHER. Yes, sir, Colonel Carnes will testify.
Mr. DURHAM. Colonel, you may proceed.

Colonel CARNES. Mr. Chairman, members of the subcommittee, I am Colonel Carnes of the Air Force representing the Department of Defense. I have with me Colonel Nettles and Mr. Peters of our specific office.

The Department of the Air Force has been designated as the representative of the Department of Defense for this legislation. I represent the Department of the Air Force for that purpose. I have a prepared statement.

The purpose of this bill is to amend sections 2742, 8744, 8745, 8747, 8748, and 8750 of title 10, United States Code, to provide for changes in designation of the Distinguished Service Cross and the Soldier's Medal to the Air Force Cross and the Airman's Medal, respectively. The current designations of Distinguished Service Cross and Soldier's Medal identify these medals as decorations of the U.S. Army, and are essentially carryovers from the period before the Air Force was made a separate Department under the National Security Act of 1947.

Since that time, the Air Force has made several distinctive changes primarily to foster esprit de corps and increase the morale of its members. For example, in April 1952, the enlisted rank designations of private, private first class, corporal and sergeant, were changed in the Air Force to basic airman, airman third class, airman second class, and airman first class, respectively, and are equivalent to the Department of the Navy designations of apprentice seaman, seaman, and petty officer third class.

In January 1949, the Air Force adopted the present blue uniform to identify its wearers as members of the U.S. Air Force. In November 1957, the Air Force established a distinctive Longevity Service Ribbon for wear on the Air Force uniform as a visable means of recognizing certain periods of active Federal service performed by its military members.

On 24 March 1957, the Secretray of the Air Force approved the establishment of a distinctive Air Force Commendation Medal to provide Air Force members with a decoration peculiar to their service. We also are in the process of designing a distinctive Distinguished Service Medal for subsequent introduction into the Air Force decorations and awards program. The changes provided for in this proposed legislation are, therefore, another step in the program of the Air Force to establish its own service traditions.

A precedent for the proposed changes is found in sections 6242 and 6246 of title 10, United States Code, wherein the Department of the Navy is authorized the Navy Cross and the Navy and Marine Corps Medal on the same basis as the Army's Distinguished Service Cross and Soldier's Medal.

Enactment of this proposed legislation does not affect the eligibility criteria governing the award of either the Distinguished Service Cross or the Soldier's Medal. The same criteria will be used for the proposed Air Force decorations. I also would like to point out that the authority which the proposed legislation would provide will be applicable only with respect to future awards of the decorations in question.

I appreciate this opportunity of appearing before the committee, and shall be happy to answer any questions that members of the committee may have on this bill.

Mr. DURHAM. Thank you very much, Colonel. Under the present status of the law, you can't at the present time award the Distinguished Service Cross, is that correct?

Colonel Carnes. We do award that using the Army Distinguished Service Cross.

Mr. DURHAM. But you have to go to the Army to get it done?

Colonel CARNES. No, sir, we do not. We have stocks of those medals on hand and can do that unilaterally.

Mr. DURHAM. Unilaterally!
Colonel CARNES. Yes, sir.

Mr. DURHAM. Are there any questions?

Mr. PRICE. Is there any other decoration now that might come under this category that should be given effective change the same time?

Colonel CARNES. No, sir. If you notice on this card, I believe there is one copy that the committee has, we have in process right now a change in the Distinguished Service Medal and also have already changed the Commendation Medal. Both of those, however, were done by administrative action and did not require legislation.

Mr. DURHAM. There is no cost involved in this, is there?

Colonel CARNES. The only cost, sir, would be the development of the distinctive medal for the Air Force and the stocking of those medals.

Mr. PRICE. The point I wanted to be certain of while we are doing the job, be certain that you are doing a complete job at one time.

Colonel CARNES. We feel that we are, sir. Mr. LANKFORD. Would this give the Air Force a complete distinctive set of awards? Will this finish it up?

Colonel CARNEs. Yes, sir; it would. Relatively speaking, it would give the Air Force a similar set of distinctive awards to that of the Army and the Navy.

Mř. BURNS. Mr. Chairman, I have got one question that probably is explainable here. Looking at the bill, section 2, page 3, "shall be treated as if he had not been awarded an Air Force Cross or Airman's Medal, as the case may be.”

You are not changing those who have been awarded. You are making sure that they remain where they were ? Colonel CARNES. That is correct, sir. Mr. COHELAN. Mr. Chairman, I just have a question: What medals are common to all the services at the present time?

Colonel CARNES. Common to all the services are the Silver Star, the Legion of Merit, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Bronze Star Medal, the Air Medal, and the Purple Heart.

Mr. DURHAM. Any further questions? Without objection, the bill is reported favorably to the full committee. Thank you very much.

(Whereupon, the committee proceeded to further business.)

H.R. 3290

Mr. KELLEHER. The next bill, Mr. Chairman, is H.R. 3290, it relates to reports made by the Navy chaplains. The bill follows: A BILL To amend title 10, United States Code, to eliminate the requirement that each

chaplain make an annual report to the Secretary of the Navy Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That subsection (d) of section 6031 of title 10, United States Code is hereby repealed.

Admiral Rosso is here, sir. Mr. DURHAM. Admiral come around. Admiral Rosso. It is nice to be here, Mr. Chairman. Mr. DURHAM. All right, you may proceed. Admiral Rosso. Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, the bill we are considering is intended to repeal a provision of existing

law which requires each chaplain in the Navy to make an annual report to the Secretary of the Navy concerning the official services performed by him. That provision of law was enacted in 1860.

At that time, and until 1941, there were approximately 24 chaplains in the Navy and since those chaplains were widely distributed, the annual reporting system was the most effective way for the Secretary of the Navy to keep advised as to their activities.

At the present time, however, there are approximately 800 chaplains in the Chaplain Corps of the Navy. These chaplains are now administered by, and are responsible to, the Chief of Chaplains who, in addition to routine reporting requirements, obtains quarterly from each fieet, force, or district chaplain a statistical summary of the activities of individual chaplains assigned to respective commands.

Mr. DURHAM. What does that mean? You have to sit down and report every time he goes around to the sick bay to see a serviceman!

Admiral Rosso. He makes a quarterly report, Mr. Chairman, of his entire religious program, the number of divine services that he may hold in the course of a week and month, the number of counseling sessions that he has with the various enlisted men or officers, the visits he has made to the sick bay, the lectures that he has given.

This information is subsequently forwarded to the Chief of Naval Personnel and is thus available to the Secretary of the Navy. However, because of the existing statutory requirement, individual chapains are also required to submit an annual report of their activities to the Secretary of the Navy, thus resulting in a duplication of time and effort which serves actually no useful purpose.

Inasmuch as the Chief of Chaplains is primarily concerned with the appointment, professional qualifications, distribution, activities, and performance of individual chaplains, he performs for practical purposes, the functions formerly directly performed by the Secretary of the Navy in respect to the administration of Navy chaplains. It therefore appears evident that the existing statutory reporting requirement for Navy chapains has been rendered obsolete, and for this reason it is recommended that section 6031(d) of title 10, United States Code, be repealed.

Mr. DURHAM. The Secretary of the Navy agrees with this?

Admiral Rosso. I am quite sure. Actually the reports never go to the Secretary of the Navy. They come in to the Chief of Chaplains' office.

Mr. NORBLAD. This is one bill that will save a few nickels, isn't it? Admiral Rosso. We estimate it will save at least $5,000 a year.

Mr. Hess. Mr. Chairman, I am glad to see that the Navy has come in here and asked us to repeal some laws. I hope the other services do likewise and that the Navy will go over all their old antiquated laws and ask us to repeal them.

Mr. DURHAM. That is a good suggestion.

Without objection it will be sent to the full committee with a favorable recommendation.

(Whereupon, the subcommittee proceeded to further business.)

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SUBCOMMITTEE NO. 3 CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 3368, A BILL TO

EXTEND THE SPECIAL ENLISTMENT PROGRAMS PROVIDED BY
SECTION 262 OF THE ARMED FORCES RESERVE ACT OF 1952, AS
AMENDED

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES,

SUBCOMMITTEE No.3,

Washington, D.C., February 18, 1959. The subcommittee met, pursuant to call, in room 304, House Office Building, at 10:10 a.m., Hon. L. Mendel Rivers (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.

Mr. RIVERS. Let the committee come to order.

The bill under consideration this morning is H.R. 3368. The purpose of this bill, which is sponsored by the Department of Defense and approved by the Bureau of the Budget, is to extend until August 1, 1963, the special reserve component enlistment programs provided by section 262 of the Armed Forces Reserve Act of 1952, as amended by section 2(1), Reserve Forces Act of 1955.

Without objection, H.R. 3368 will appear in the record at this point.

(H.R. 3368 follows:) A BILL To extend the special enlistment programs provided by section 262 of the Armed

Forces Reserve Act of 1952, as amended Be it enacted by the Seante and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section 262 of the Armed Forces Reserve Act of 1952, as amended (50 U.S.C. 1013), is further amended by deleting the date “August 1, 1959" in the first sentence of section 262(a) and inserting in lieu thereof the date “August 1, 1963”.

Mr. RIVERS. It is this authority upon which the Department of Defense has established its 6-month training program. Under present law, the authority for this program, among other things, will expire on August 1, 1959.

The Department of Defense has indicated that extension of such authority is considered essential to the maintenance of the strengths and mobilization readiness of the Reserve components.

As you will recall, the Congress, during the past few days, has voted an extension of the induction provisions of the Universal Military Training and Service Act until July 1, 1963.

The provisions of this proposal would similarly extend those provisions of the Armed Forces Reserve Act which permit the deferment and exemption from draft liability of individuals who agree to perform 6 months of active duty for training with the Armed Forces and continue to perform satisfactorily in the Reserve Forces. 3406659_No.7

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