Heroines that Every Child Should Know: Tales for Young People of the World's Heroines of All Ages

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Hamilton Wright Mabie, Kate Stephens
Grosset & Dunlap, 1908 - 281 pages
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A collection of biographical sketches of great heroines from ancient and modern times.
 

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Contents

I
3
II
18
IV
33
V
43
VI
57
VIII
101
IX
132
X
146
XI
174
XII
190
XIII
230
XIV
241
XV
266
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Page 280 - WHENE'ER a noble deed is wrought, Whene'er is spoken a noble thought, Our hearts, in glad surprise, To higher levels rise. The tidal wave of deeper souls Into our inmost being rolls, And lifts us unawares Out of all meaner cares.
Page 265 - I say unto you, inasmuch as ye have done it unto the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.
Page 144 - I pray you all, good Christian people, to bear me witness that I die a true Christian woman, and that I...
Page 281 - I in that house of misery A lady with a lamp I see Pass through the glimmering gloom, And flit from room to room.
Page 257 - They climbed the steep ascent of heaven Through peril, toil, and pain : O God, to us may grace be given To follow in their train.
Page 55 - LORD, I have loved the habitation of thy house, and the place where thine honour dwelleth.
Page 279 - Another extraordinary fallacy is the dread of night air. What air can we breathe at night but night air ? The choice is between pure night air from without and foul night air from within. Most people prefer the latter. An unaccountable choice. What will they say if it is proved to be true that fully one-half of all the disease we suffer from is occasioned by people sleeping with their windows shut ? An open window most nights in the year can never hurt any one.
Page 136 - I wist all their sport in the park is but a shadow to that pleasure that I find in Plato. Alas ! good folk, they never felt what true pleasure meant.
Page 109 - While the woman spoke, the King's horse reared As if it would breast the sea, And the Queen turned pale as she heard on the gale The voice die dolorously. When the woman ceased, the Steed was still, But the King gazed on her yet, And in silence save for the wail of the sea His eyes and her eyes met.

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