When Gravity Fails

Front Cover
Macmillan, 2005 - 284 pages

In a decadent world of cheap pleasures and easy death, Marid Audrian has kept his independence the hardway. Still, like everything else in the Budayeen, he's available...for a price.

For a new kind of killer roams the streets of the Arab ghetto, a madman whose bootlegged personality cartridges range from a sinister James Bond to a sadistic disemboweler named Khan. And Marid Audrian has been made an offer he can't refuse.

The 200-year-old "godfather" of the Budayeen's underworld has enlisted Marid as his instrument of vengeance. But first Marid must undergo the most sophisticated of surgical implants before he dares to confront a killer who carries the power of every psychopath since the beginning of time.

Wry, savage, and unignorable, When Gravity Fails was hailed as a classic by Effinger's fellow SF writers on its original publication in 1987, and the sequence of "Marid Audrian" novels it begins were the culmination of his career.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wishanem - LibraryThing

Pseudo-Middle-Eastern Cyberpunk Detective Noir. Certainly a unique combination. A dismal mess throughout, but I think that was the author's intention. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - evenlake - LibraryThing

Realized I had read this before many years ago when I was on a cyberpunk kick. It was still good enough to read again, and worth the time to get a different angle on cyberpunk. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
11
Section 2
21
Section 3
31
Section 4
44
Section 5
55
Section 6
72
Section 7
98
Section 8
110
Section 12
162
Section 13
176
Section 14
189
Section 15
208
Section 16
228
Section 17
240
Section 18
256
Section 19
269

Section 9
122
Section 10
134
Section 11
149
Section 20
276
Section 21
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

A winner of the Hugo and Nebula Awards, George Alec Effinger was the author of What Entropy Means to Me and Schrodinger's Kitten. He died in 2002.

Bibliographic information