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unto you.

A Sermon, delivered at Ashburn- strange concerning the fiery trial,

ham, May 22d, 1806, at the in- which is to try you, as though terment of Mr. John Cushing, some strange thing had happened jun. who expired at the house

After an appropriate of his father. By Seth Payson, introduction, he proposes his A. M. Pastor of the church in plan of discourse in the following Rindge. Published by request. words. “ We are here taught Leominster. S. & J. Wilder, that those, who are beloved of 1807.

God, are exposed to severe tri

als ; and that the heavy aftlicWhile the pilgrimage of tions, laid upon them, afford no mortals is through a vale of tears, just cause of surprise.” while « man is born to trouble as

Under the first general head the sparks fly upward," that re

we find the following observaligion must be peculiarly dear to

tions. him, which affords the strong

“ Above all things else is the honour est consolation under the pres- of God and the glory of the Saviour sure of calamity, and teaches him dear to the Christian. To what pain. in the best manner the heavenly ful sensations then is he subject in a art of educing good from evii. world, where this glory is neglected, This is the glory of the Chris- blend trampled under foot, which he

this love despised, and that precious tian religion ; and surely the knows was the price paid for the ranviews it presents are admirably som of his soul, and which has brought calculated to animate the des- peace to his conscience, and heaven

to his heart ?” ponding mind, and to cheer the drooping spirits. What can be

That the Christian has no more so, than the assurance of a cause for surprise o account of superintending Providence, or

the afflictions he is called to endering all things for the best ; dure, is shown from a number of than the prospect of an eternal considerations, that are brought weight of glory, infinitely coun- into view, collectively, in the folterbalancing the evils of time, lowing paragraph, though secured and enhanced “ Forewarned that the Christian's by them ; than the example of life is a warfare ; that Christ himself

was made perfect through sufferings the wise and good in all ages, encompassed with a cloud of witnes and of the divine Author of the ses, who rose out of great tribulation, religion himself, all of whom and now stand with the Lamb on were made perfect through suf- Mt. Zion; assured that the sufferings

of time are designed to make us partaferings?

kers of the divine nature, and that they Such are the topics of conso- will so soon be crowned with immordation, on which the ministers of tal bliss ; under these viewe, do the se. the gospel are called frequently verest trials afford any ground to suslo dweli. In the sermon under pect, either the truth of the promises, review we find them presented in rather afford ground to welcome the

or our interest in them? Do they not a clear and forcible manner, well hand, which corrects us for our bene. calculated to command attention, fit, and has opened so many springs and to convey solace and in- of consolation for the support of his struction.

afflicted people? What thanks are due

to the Father of mercies for the re, The text is from the epistle of freshing hopes and comforts of the St. Peter. Brethren, think it not gospel ? That God reigns ; that he

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in this passage, the author ob- strains them serves, 1. That the times of man's and inquire

be saved ?" ī natural life; 2. the times of the

to the only .

puh spiritual life of believers, in- viour, rii

It was fear? cluding all the varieties of their gospel, 1,

: be thoroughly s religious experience ; and 3. the

I those materais time of their death, are in the they virom?

selie

a rupied the atteaca Lord's hands.

sel

fiers of Churcb Fs The following paragraph, from to

b. 3 view to ascertain the 2d head of discourse, is giv- turi

5.12 upon the particular en as an agreeable specimen of

-. bis research. But the sentiment and style of the

accessary, that, taking a sermon.

..ngo le should peneza “ For a while they (that is, they

u private history and who are to be the final subjects of

sus predecessors ; salvation,) are permitted to main with “ the world which I.

seer to form a in wickedness,” “to walk after .

oncerning the en ways of their own hearts, and in

sectaracter of intrsight of their own eyes,” depi't

- peruse 750 tis farther and farther from God, dering in the fruitless pursuit

- Dungs, D. piness, through the various

9. ltest CORRIES worldly vanity, and amidst ti

- sa fare plied snares of the cruel de

los amus i who leads the children of

* nit to the int ence captives at his will."

De works e tess with a most malicious trin expectation of soon plur

usimai historians en headlong into everlastu

sose Igiendid chances de But the time of diti

me who bore 2 is love at length arrives, fatuated servants of

ses in the chant : somed; when these is

nee de actions de of Satan must be

se nourable of de “these lost sheep

anda. and bishops, and back to the fold

REQUERIES Be work before es Shepherd.” WITH reer of bold impic

BERS to song," bat and licentious

128205, 1 ste isk of life, are their thoughtles

USBE-Sant te coscurity; and, broad road of u

mung 1 day in whick a fashionable amu

ar martial judgment of cent, lifeless f virtue, they we

se will se formed, and in destruction; th

HE: Le righteous only shall be rested by an in

neterissting remembrance, now the Divine

11237 sure held up to the regard Father through

une almiration of mankind, as
sunumests of the transforming

at arise grace.
issot only on account of
an industry, and unwea.

that Mr. Milner de.

as

illot

Wiere

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i'the sacred writers, whose his

rical details describe men Frey are, while their precepis point out what they ought to be. Our author's appreciation of the merits and defects of Wickliff,

Luther, Erasmus, &c. will exon of emplify this remark. IVe mean Hem not to assert, that Mr. Milner baş by no in no instance erred in the view

he has given either of facts or fily's, we characters ; or that he has been 3, the artful in no instance biassed in his presentations judgment by his peculiar senti

jon, by which ments in theology ; but thus · had been given much we feel ourselves justified

sling greatly to in asserting, that, in general, we "11 of Christianity. may safely rely not only on the

that Mr. Milner representation he has given of xcels in accuracy of facts, but on the estimate he has In, and soundness of formed of characters. The love

and we are disposed of truth evidently constituted a se bis superiority in this striking feature in our author's to his invariable practice, mind. That sterling integrity ie in which we fear that which dares not fatter, and will

historian he will be found not deceive, is very conspicuous ..ud nearly alone, of estimat in his work ; nor can any one,

men's characters and actions who reads it with care, entertain the unvarying standard of the a doubt that the object of its aurid of God. His knowledge of thor was, not to gratify his own

e human heart was deep, his vanity by composing a book iews of religion and of its influ- which should enhance his literaence just and extensive ; he pos- ry fame, or to obtain popularity sessed also an originality and in- by accommodating himself to the dependence of mind which pre- prevailing taste ; but, with simvented his servilely copying the plicity and plainness, to set beplans or adopting the sentiments fore his readers the genuine of preceding writers. His re- principles of the gospel of Christ, marks on the different characters and io exemplily their effects on which pass under his review, the spirit and conduct of such as manifest a more than usual share cordially embraced them. of acute observation, while they The strong and uniform atexhibit a pleasing spirit of Chris- tachment shewn by Mr. Milner. tián candour and charity. In the to those truths which are pecuimpartiality with which he no- liarly entitled to the appellation tices the faults and defects of of evangelical ought not to be Christians, whose lives in the omitted in the enuineration of main were excellent, we recog- his merits as the historian of the nize an imitation of the fidelity church of Christ. With= re.

exercises a special providence toward that he had therefore to contend those who put their trust in him, and with the various difficulties which that his wisdom, power, and goodness are continually employed in pre. must be encountered by those paring them for future glory, are

who pursue a path hitherto untruths, which need but to be realized, attempted. It was necessary to raise the mind above the evils of that he should be thoroughly actime, and to fill it with all joy and quainted with all those materials peace in believing.”

which had occupied the attention The subject is then applied to

of former writers of Church His. the occasion, which produced it. tory, with a view to ascertain The deceased is represented as a

their bearing upon the particular very worthy man ; and bis pro- objects of his research. But it fession, as a merchant, leads to a

was also necessary, that, taking a train of useful reflections on the

wider range, he should penetrate importance and advantages of recesses of private history unescommerce. The consolations of plored by his predecessors; and the gospel are more particularly that, in order to form a true addressed to the bereaved, and the judgment concerning the sentiauthor concludes with seriously ments and character of individu. applying the lessons of Prov. als, he should peruse with attenidence to his audience at

tion original writings, which belarge.

fore had been almost consigned On the whole, we have been

to oblivion ; a task far more lahappy to find that the discourse, borious, and less amusing than we have been reviewing, com

commonly fall to the lot of au. ported with the character, its au

thors. The works of other ecthor has sustained, as a man of clesiastical historians exhibit insense, and a Christian ; and we

deed, in splendid characters, the cordially recommend it to the lives of men who bore a distin. perusal of our readers.

guished rank in the church ; they record the actions of the great and honourable of the

earth; of kings, and bishops, and Milner's History of the Church of councils. In the work before us, Christ.

names “unknown to song,” but (Being informed that an American inscribed in the book of life, are Edition of Milner's Church His. drawn from their obscurity; and, TORY is contemplated, we intro- anticipating that day in which a duce under this head, for the infor. mation of the American public, the

true and impartial judgment of following concluding remarks, on

merit will be formed, and in this excellent work, of the Review- which the righteous only shall be ers in the Christian Observer.] had in everlasting remembrance,

In forming an estimate of Mr. they are held up to the regard Milner's labours, it must be kept and admiration of mankind, as in mind, that the design of his monuments of the transforming history was entirely new; and power of divine grace.

But it is not only on account of • By Messrs. Farrand, Mallory, & his patient industry, and unwea. Co. in Boston.

ried research, that Mr. Milner de. serves the grateful thanks of the of the sacred writers, whose hischurch of Christ, but likewise torical details describe men as for bis strenuous endeavours to they are, while their precepis correct the opinions of mankind point out what they ought to be. on many important points, by Our author's appreciation of the leading them to form their deci- merits and defects of Wickliff, sions according to truth, and not Luther, Erasmus, &c. will exaccording to the false criterion of emplify this remark. We mean worldly estimation. We deem not to assert, that Mr. Milner baş those parts of his work by no in no instance erred in the view means the least valuable, where he has given either of facts or he has combated, and always, we characters ; or that he has been conceive, with success, the artful in no instance biassed in his and insidious misrepresentations judgment by his peculiar sentiof Hume and Gibbon, by which ments in thcology ; but thus a general currency had been given much we feel ourselves justified to sentiments tending greatly to in asserting, that, in general, we the depreciation of Christianitymay safely rely not only on the

We think that Mr. Milner representation he has given of particularly excels in accuracy of facts, but on the estimate he has discrimination, and soundness of formed of characters. The love judgment; and we are disposed of truth evidently constituted a to attribute his superiority in this striking feature in our author's respect to his invariable practice, mind. That sterling integrity a practice in which we fear that which dares not latter, and will as an historian he will be found not deceive, is very conspicuous to stand nearly alone, of estimat in his work; nor can any one, ing men's characters and actions who reads it with care, entertain by the unvarying standard of the a doubt that the object of its auword of God. His knowledge of thor was, not to gratify his own the human heart was deep, his vanity by composing a book, views of religion and of its influ- which should enhance his literaence just and extensive ; he pos- ry fame, or to obtain popularity sessed also an originality and in- by accommodating himself to the dependence of mind which pre- prevailing taste ; but, with simvented his servilely copying the plicity and plainness, to set beplans or adopting the sentiments fore bis readers the genuine of preceding writers. His re- principles of the gospel of Christ, marks on the different characters and io exemplify their effects on which pass under his review, the spirit and conduct of such as manifest a more than usual share cordially embraced them. of acute observation, while they The strong and uniform at. exhibit a pleasing spirit of Chris- taclıment shewn by Mr. Milner. tián candour and charity. In the to those truths which are pecuimpartiality with which he no- liarly entitled to the appellation tices the faults and defects of of evangelical ouzlit not to be Christians, whose lives in the omitted in the enumeration of main were excellent, we recog.. his merits as the historian of the nizę an imitation of the fidelity church of Christ. With. re

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