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Pecuniary embarrassment,
Pennsylvania and Massachusetts com-
pared,

Pennsylvania, importance and resources

of, 193; eastern part of, 194; Ger-
mans in, 195; population of, S. West-
ern, 196; destitutions in, 196; deno-
minations in,

People trying to help themselves,

Philadelphia H. M. Soc., 34; Report,
Picture, a brighter

209

Resolutions of Cleveland Convention, 94;
of Middlesex S. Assoc., 176; of the
Synod of Ill., 84; of Trumbull Pres-
bytery, 136; of Synod of Pa.,
Results of a year's labor, 113; of H. Mis-

172

sions, 130; in Maine, 141; in Mass., 142
177
Review of labor, 181; of mercies,
Revival of temperance,
134, 231
Revivals, 91; in B——, II., 16; Benton-

ville, Ark., 19; Algonac, Mich., 69;
Lyons, Mich., 137; Platteville, Wis.,
150; Belleville, Ill., 258; Michigan
City, Ind., 269; Belvidere, Ill., 271;
West Mill Grove, Ind., 272; Hock
ing City and Port, O., 272; Saline,
Mich.,
Rhode Island H. M. Soc.,
Rogers, Rev. W. M., Address of

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273

53

of

111

Romance of Antinomianism,

67

Population of Missouri,

253

Romanism,

212, 213

Population of U. S., progressive increase, 241

Ryland, Rev. B., installation of

178

Population, probable distribution of

243

Sabbath Schools, 28, 114; needed,

134

Position of Home Missions,

145

Poverty abounding to rich liberality,

136

Sabbath school efforts, 106; supplied
with libraries,

161

Poverty of Churches, -

152 Sabbath scholar, death of

155

Poverty of the people,

138 Sacrifices and blessings,

258

Pray for the Home Missionary,

156 Sac and Fox Indians,

221

Pray for the new settlements,

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112

Prayer for revival,

227

Sanctified affliction,

13

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Preachers, intelligent and active, wanted, 109

114 Scriptural instruction,

265 Sectarian misrepresentations,

Sceptic, a gray-headed

86

81

157

Preaching, the great aim,

171 Seminary of learning in Ark.,

19, 125

Preparing the ground,

85

Send laborers,

178

Preparation for the future,

229

Sermon of Prof. Barrows,

1

Privations of early settlers,
Privileged position,

126

Sermon of Rev. S. W. Fisher,

121

143 Sheep without a shepherd,

132

vii

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WE have already, in the Home Missionary for December last, alluded to the excellent discourse on Home Missions, delivered before the Synod of the Western Reserve, by Rev. E. P. Barrows, Professor of Sacred Literature in the Western Reserve College. In that discourse the preacher maintains the position, that THE CAUSE OF HOME MISSIONS "IS, IN ITS IMPORTANCE, AND ITS CLAIMS UPON THE AMERICAN CHURCHES, SECOND TO NO CAUSE

WHATEVER."

The time has come when no reflecting person can shut his eyes to the prospects before us; but the thickening evidences that we must do quickly whatever is done for saving America, and making her the means of ministering salvation to other nations, can no longer be kept out of view. The position taken by Professor Barrows, is held by an increasing number of the most intelligent minds in our own country; but it is peculiarly interesting to hear it advocated from a western college. The fact, that our population is rushing on so rapidly toward the setting sun, that where lately was an untrodden wilderness, society has now already reached maturity, and has its seminaries and colleges, is itself an illustration of the urgency of the Home Missionary claim. Such a fact admonishes us that soon the institutions of the West will be formed; but how they shall be formed; whether Christianity shall mould them, or whether they shall be shaped by the hand of infidelity and imbued with its spirit, depends upon what the Spirit of God may prompt the Christians of the East to do within the compass of a very few years.

In support of the proposition announced above, Prof. Barrows speaks, first, of the MAGNITUDE OF THE HOME MISSIONARY FIELD; second, of its RELATIONS; and third, of its PREPARATION. We have already quoted, vol. xvi., p. 186, the substance of the remarks under the first head. We subjoin the following extracts on the remaining topics.

The Relations of the Home Missionary field.

1. Its relations to us as Christians.

Here it is sufficient to say that it embraces our brethren, united to us by the ties of consanguinity and common origin; of a common language, of common laws, of a common national destiny. Although this does not make the salvation of their souls, in itself considered, more valuable, it does impose upon us higher obligations to labor for their salvation.

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The divine declaration that "if any provide not for his own, and especially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel,” though originally made with reference to temporal affairs, holds equally good in spiritual things. Our primary obligations are to the souls of those with whom the providence of God has placed us in the most immediate connection. The salvation of a believer's children is not, in itself, of higher importance than that of his neighbor's children. But a higher obligation rests on him to seek their salvation based upon the peculiar relation which he sustains to them. The prosperity of a local church with which a particular christian is connected, is not necessarily of more value than that of other churches. But, because of the special relation which he holds to that church, a special obligation is devolved upon him to seek its welfare.

Now apply this common-sense principle to the relation which we, as a nation, sustain to the unevangelized of our country. They are connected with us by closer ties than the unevangelized of any other country; and, for this reason, they have a primary claim upon our sympathies, prayers and efforts. The Savior himself enjoined upon his disciples the observance of this principle. “He said unto them, Thus it is written, and thus it behooved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead on the third day; and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations beginning at Jerusalem. And this rule they every where followed. Even in foreign nations they preached the word first to their own countrymen, then to the Gentiles.

No one, I trust, will understand me as maintaining that we are not to carry the Gospel to the heathen until all our own countrymen have been evangelized. This would be a very dangerous and pernicious doctrine, at war alike with sound philosophy, with scriptural precedent, and with the experience of the church in all ages. That for which I am contending is, that while we seek, as we ought, the salvation of the heathen, we are not to neglect that of our own countrymen, to seek which is our primary duty.

It is a solemn consideration that God has laid upon us, the citizens of the United States, the responsibility of evangelizing our own nation, and this responsibility we must meet at the judgment day. In the work of Foreign Missions other nations may co-operate with us, and supply, in a measure, our “lack of service." But if we fail in carrying the Gospel to our own citizens, there is no other nation to do the work for us. The guilt of the neglect will be ours alone, and upon our heads, too, will fall the ruinous consequences. On the other hand, by faithfully performing this duty, we have such an opportunity of achieving permanent good, and good upon a scale of immense and progressive magnitude, as is granted to no other nation under heaven. Shall we not improve it, and reap the glorious reward?

2. Its relations to our national welfare.

The noble fabric of our free institutions was reared by our forefathers upon the foundation of evangelical principles. Had they not possessed minds en. larged, and liberalized, and purified by the assiduous study of God's word, far beyond the spirit of the age in which they lived, they could never have conceived of so wise a system of government as that which they established. Had not this system of government been nurtured in its infancy by the deep religious principle which its founders possessed and transmitted to their children, it could

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