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COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

(87th Cong.)

CARL VINSON, Georgia, Chairman

L. MENDEL RIVERS, South Carolina

LESLIE C. ARENDS, Illinois PHILIP J. PHILBIN, Massachusetts

LEON H. GAVIN, Pennsylvania F. EDWARD HÉBERT, Louisiana

WALTER NORBLAD, Oregon ARTHUR WINSTEAD, Mississippi

JAMES E. VAN ZANDT, Pennsylvania MELVIN PRICE, Illinois

WILLIAM H. BATES, Massachusetts 0. C. FISHER, Texas

ALVIN E. O'KONSKI, Wisconsin PORTER HARDY, JR., Virginia

WILLIAM G. BRAY, Indiana CLYDE DOYLE, California

BOB WILSON, California CHARLES E. BENNETT, Florida

FRANK C. OSMERS, JR., New Jersey RICHARD E. LANKFORD, Maryland

CHARLES S. GUBSER, California GEORGE HUDDLESTON, JR., Alabama FRANK J. BECKER, New York JAMES A. BYRNE, Pennsylvania

CHARLES E. CHAMBERLAIN, Michigan A. PAUL KITCHIN, North Carolina

ALEXANDER PIRNIE, New York DANIEL B. BREWSTER, Maryland

DURWARD G. HALL, Missouri FRANK KOWALSKI, Connecticut

DONALD D. CLANCY, Ohio
SAMUEL S. STRATTON, New York

ROBERT T. STAFFORD, Vermont
JEFFERY COHELAN, California
VICTOR WICKERSHAM, Oklahoma
OTIS G. PIKE, New York
J. T. RUTHERFORD, Texas
A. FERNÓS-ISERN, Puerto Rico

ROBERT W. SWART, Ohief Counsel

SPECIAL SUBCOM MITTEE ON DEFENSE AGENCIES

PORTER HARDY, JR., Chairman

WILLIAM H. BATES
John R. BLANDTORD, Counsol

(No. 69]

REPORT OF SPECIAL SUBCOMMITTEE ON DEFENSE AGENCIES

On March 26, 1962, Carl Vinson, Democrat, of Georgia, chairman, House Committee on Armed Services, appointed Porter Hardy, Jr., Democrat, of Virginia, chairman, and 'William H. Bates, Republican, of Massachusetts, as a special subcommittee to inquire into agencies that had been created or were contemplated in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, John R. Blandford was designated counsel.

In the letter appointing the subcommittee, Chairman Vinson directed that

The subcommittee will examine into the present organization of the Department of Defense with respect to Department of Defense agencies and the extent to which these agencies are engaged or contemplate engaging in operations that heretofore were operated separately by the military departments or under a single manager system within one of the military departments.

The subcommittee will take into consideration the general objectives of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, with particular reference to the declaration of policy as contained in section 2, section 202(c) (1), and section 202(c) (6), and those provisions of the National Security Act dealing with the general roles and missions of the four separate services as contained in sections 3012, 5012, 5013, and 8012 of the United States Code. The subcommittee will exainine into

1. The statutory authorization for each Department of Defense agency;

2. The extent to which operational control of the subject matter has been transferred in part or in whole to the Department of Defense as distinguished from a military department;

3. The extent to which these agencies are dependent upon a military de partment for custodial and maintenance services;

4. The number and type of such additional agencies contemplated or planned for the future;

5. The extent to which the activities of present agencies may or are planned to be expanded ; and

6. The effect these agencies have upon the overall efficiency and combat effectiveness of the three military departments and the four separate

services. The subcommittee will report its findings to the Armed Services Committee not later than July 1, 1962.

Upon receipt of this letter, the chairman of the subcommittee addressed a letter to the Secretary of Defense informing him of the establishment of the subcommittee. Thereafter, on March 27, 1962, the following letter was addressed to the Secretary of Defense: Hon. ROBERT S. MCNAMARA, The Secretary of Defense, Washington, D.C.

MY DEAR MR. SECRETARY : In preparing for the hearings that the Special Subcommittee on Defense Agencies will conduct in the near future, I would very much appreciate it if you would furnish me with the following information:

1. Please identify each separate Department of Defense agency, and the date each agency was created. 2. Please state the statutory basis for each Defense agency.

3. Please submit the number of personnel employed or assigned to each agency, with a separate breakdown between military personnel and civilian employees. 4. Please identify the areas of responsibility for each agency.

(6505)

5. Please identify what agencies, divisions, or functions have been eliminated in the three military departments following the establishment of each separate agency.

6. Please identify the areas in which each Department of Defense agency operates that has a counterpart still in operation within a military department

7. Please identify any new areas that are being considered for consolidation in a new Defense agency.

8. Please entify functions now performed by military departments that will be absorbed by existing Defense agencies. If it is possible to expedite your reply, I would be grateful. Sincerely yours,

PORTER HARDY, Jr., Chairman, Special Subcommittee on Defense Agencies. On April 13, 1962, a classified reply was received. The following excerpts from this reply have been declassified: Please identify each separate Department of Defense agency, and the date each

agency was created

[blocks in formation]

As a result of the dissolution of the Manhattan Engineer District and the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission, the Armed Forces special weapons project (AFSWP) was established in 1947 to furnish support to the Armed Forces in the field of atomic weapons. DASA was established on May 1, 1959, and assumed the functions previously performed by AFSWP.

NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NSA)

NSA was established on November 4, 1952, pursuant to a Presidential direc tive. It replaced the Armed Forces Security Agency which had been established by the Secretary of Defense in May 1949. The circumstance leading to the creation of NSA are discussed in detail on page 6 of this report.

DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS AGENCY (DCA)

DCA was established by Secretary of Defense Gates on May 12, 1960.

DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY (DIA)

DIA was established on October 1, 1961.

DEFENSE SUPPLY AGENCY (DSA)

DSA was established on November 6, 1961.

DEFENSE ATOMIC SUPPORT AGENCY (DASA)

DASA is established under authority of sections 202(c) (1) and 202 (c) (6) of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended.

NATIONAL SECURITY AGENOY (NSA)

NSA is established by direction of the President. In implementing the deci. sion of the President, the Secretary of Defense used the authorities provided in section 202 of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended.

DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS AGENCY (DCA)

DCA is established under authority of sections 202(c) (1) and 202 (c) (6) of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended.

DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY (DIA)

DIA is established under authority of sections 202 (c) (1) and 202 (c)(6) of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended.

DIFENBE SUPPLY AGENCY (DBA)

DSA is established under authority of sections 202(c) (1) and 202(c)(6) of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, Please state the statutory basis for each Defense Agency

General.-Section 2 of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, states, that it is the intent of Congress “to eliminate unnecessary duplication in the Department of Defense" and "to provide more effective, efficient, and economical administration." To these ends, the Secretary of Defense is directed by section 202(C) (1) of the act to “take appropriate steps (including the transfer, reassignment, abolition, and consolidation of functions) to provide in the Department of Defense for more effective, efficient, and economical administration and operation, and to eliminate duplication."

In addition, section 202 (c) (6) of the act mandates "Whenever the Secretary of Defense determines it will be advantageous to the Government in terms of effectiveness, economy, or efficiency, he shall provide for the carrying out of any supply or service activity common to more than one military department by a single agency or such other organizational entities as he deems appropriate. For the purposes of this paragraph, any supply or service activity common to more than one military department shall not be considered a 'major combatant function' within the meaning of paragraph (1) hereof."

Section 202(e) (6) was adopted by the House of Representatives during flrior action on the DOD Reorganization Act of 1958. Its sponsor, Congressman McCormack, stated to the House of Representatives before the amendment was approved, that it was intended expressly to include “* * * procurement, warehousing, distribution, cataloging, and other supply activities, surplus disposal, financial management, budgeting, disbursing, accounting, and so forth, medical and hospital services, transportation-land, sea, and air-intelligence, legal, public relations, recruiting, military police, training, liaison activities, and so forth. . Please submit the number of personnel employed or assigned to each Agency with a separate breakdown between military personnel and civilian employees.

DEFENSE ATOMIC SUPPORT AGENCY (DABA)

As of February 28, 1962, DASA had 7,761 personnel-2,059 civilians and 5,702 military. Projected yearend strength, fiscal year 1963, is 7,713—2,102 civilians and 5,611 military.

NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NASA)

Classified.

DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS AGENCY (DCA)

As of April 1, 1962, DCA had 571 personnel-129 civilian and 442 military. Projected earend strength, fiscal year 1963, is 785—234 civilians and 551 military.

DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY (DIA) Classified.

DIA is in process of becoming fully operational. When fully operational, its estimated strength will be about

Increases in DIA strength will be offset by commensurate personnel reductions in the military departments.

DEFENSE SUPPLY AGENCY (DSA)

As of February 28, 1962, DSA had 10,129 personnel—9,487 civilian and 642 military. DSA is in a period of rapid growth as it assumes its assigned functions. Projected yearend strength, fiscal year 1963, is 23,057—22,025 civilian and 1,032 military. Increases in DSA strength will be offset by commensurate personnel reductions in the military departments. Please identify the areas of responsibility for each Agency.

DEFENSE ATOMIO SUPPORT AGENCY (DABA)

DASA furnishes staff assistance to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Office of the Secretary of Defense in atomic weapons matters. The Agency is re sponsible for overall surveillance, coordination, advice, and assistance on major actions affecting the atomic stockpile and storage and maintenance of atomic weapons. It provides atomic weapons technical, logistic, training, and stockpile management services to the military services. DASA acts as the central coordinating agent for the DOD with the AEC on matters pertaining to the research, development, production, stockpiling, and tests of atomic weapons., The Agency also supervises the conduct of full-scale DOD weapons effects tests, assists in operational evaluation tests of atomic weapons systems involving nuclear detonations, and coordinates other DOD programs for the investigation of atomic weapons effects. It provides for the collection, assessment, ad dissemination of atomic weapons damage information and data to the DOD and other appropriate Government agencies. It supplies administrative sup port and technical advice and assistance to the Joint Atomic Information Exchange Group and the Joint War Room Annex.

NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NBA)

NSA has two primary missions :

(a) A security mission.

(0) An intelligence producing mission. In order to accomplish these missions, the Director, NSA, has been assigned responsibilities as follows:

(a) Establishing certain security principles, doctrine, and procedures.
(6) Organizing and operating certain intelligence-producing facilities.

(c) Organizing and coordinating the research and engineering activities of the U.S. Government which are in support of its assigned functions.

(d) Regulating certain communications in support of its mission.

DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS AGENCY (DOA)

DCA acts as the single manager for all Department of Defense long-haul, point-to-point Government owned and leased communications. The Agency does not own these communications; they are owned and operated by the military departments and function under the operational and management direction of DCA. Stated another way, the task of the DCA is to exploit fully the capability represented by the three military departments' in-being long-haul, point-to-point worldwide communications networks, and to plan the orderly conversion of these facilities into an integrated Department of Defense communications system owned and operated by the military departments. The exploitation of the current capabilities of the Defense Communications System (DCS) is accomplished through the DCA control complex owned and operated by DCA and comprised of a Defense National Communications Control Center (DNCCC) located in Washington and four Defense Area Communications Control Centers strategically located throughout the world. In addition six Defense Regional Communications Control Centers (DRCCC) further decentralizing control, are envisioned.

Within their respective geographical areas these control centers are responsible for maintaining the hourly status of communications circuits in the Defense Communications System to include message traffic flow throughout the system. On a timely basis the centers reallocate and restore circuitry and redirect the flow of traffic as necessary to reduce backlogs. The transmission engineering to insure that all components of each long-haul communications circuit functions effectively and compatibly is also a function of the control complex.

The orderly conversion of the various military department networks into a single long-haul system is being accomplished through a comprehensive series of planning documents which

(a) Consolidate certain communications facilities to reduce resource requirements.

(b) Interconnect certain communications facilities to increase capability of current communications plants without requiring new major investments.

(c) Integrate current and planned networks to provide increased capability for a greater number of customers and enhance survivability.

(d) Reorient a large number of tributary teletype stations on other automatic switching centers to reduce the required circuit mileage from

the centers to the tributaries. Gaining single system identity and response is also being accomplished by

(a) Establishing and publishing engineering, installation, technical, and procedural standards.

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