The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth

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George Routledge and Sons, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, 1878 - 496 pages

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Contents

POEMS DEDICATED TO NATIONAL INDEPENDENCE
64
Composed in the Valley near Dover on the Day of Land
70
There is a bondage worse far worse to bear
76
The massy Wars carried across these heights
79
Upon the same Event
86
Feelings of the Tyrolese
92
Look now on that Adventurer who hath paid
98
The French and the Spanish Guerillas
104
By Moscow selfdevoted to a blaze
109
Suints
113
Feelings of a French Royalist on the Disinterment
117
Ode The Morning of the Day appointed for a General
126
Fishwomen On Landing at Calais
135
In the Cathedral at Cologne
141
Composed in one of the Catholic Cantons
147
Effusion in Presence of the Painted Tower of Tell
152
The Italian Itinerant and the Swiss Goatherd Part I
159
The Three Cottage Girls
168
Processions Suggested on a Sabbath Morning in
174
SkyProspect from the Plain of France
182
DIEJORIALS OF A TOUR IN ITALY 1837
189
The Pine of Monte Mario at Rome
203
The Virgin 114
208
From the Alban Hills looking towards Rome
209
At the Convent of Camaldoli
216
Among the Ruins of a Convent in the Apennines
222
To Cordelia MHallsteads Ullswater
228
Or The ROMANCE OF
229
The same Subject
254
Seathwaite Chapel
260
Journey renewed
266
On the Departure of Sir Walter Scott from Abbotsford
276
The pibrochs note discountenanced or mute
279
Bothwell Castle Passed unseen on Account of Stormy
290
Apology for the foregoing Poems
296
VOL IV
1
80
36
4
48
ECCLESIASTICAL SONNETS
72
Dissensions 78
78
Apology 84
84
His Descendants 90
90
Danish Conquests
91
104
104
Abuse of Monastic Power
110
Apology 114
114
Latimer and Ridley 120
120
Illustration The JungFrau and the Fall of the Rhine
126
Clerical Integrity 132
132
Obligations of Civil to Religious Liberty
134
The Liturgy
140
The Marriage Ceremony
146
Emigrant French Clergy
152
Despond who will I heard a voice exclaim
203
Cave of Staffa
209
Greenock
215
221
221
Most sweet it is with unuplifted eyes 229
229
A Poets Epitaph 243
243
Illustrated Books and Newspapers 257
257
The Force of Prayer or The Founding of Bolton Priory
271
The sylvan slopes with cornclad fields
283
Humanity
289
To upon the Birth of her Firstborn Child March
295
If this great world of joy and pain
304
Lines suggested by a Portrait from the Pencil of F Stove 313
313
Upon seeing a Colored Drawing of the Bird of Paradise
320
Continued
326
Suggested by the View of Lancaster Castle on the Road
332
All think how one compelled for life to abide 338
338
THE RIVER DUDDON
351
VOL V
353
MISCELLANEOUS POEMS
1
Upon perusing the foregoing Epistle Thirty Years after 12
12
Poor Robin 21
21
Sonnet To an Octogenarian
26
On the same Occasion
35
Goody Blake and Harry Gill A true Story
41
To a Child Written in her Album
48
The Russian Fugitive Part I
56
62
62
INSCRIPTIONS
70
Vritten with a Slate Pencil upon a Stone the largest
76
Ode Who rises on the banks of Seine 82
82
The Cuckoo and the Nightingale
97
Coutinued
105
Troilus and Cresida
112
POEMS REFERRING TO THE PERIOD OF OLD
119
The Farmer of Tilsbury Vale
126
The Two Thieves or The Last Stage of Avarice
132
By a blest Husband guided Mary came 144
144
Elegiac Stanzas suggested by a Picture of Peele Castle
150
Elegiac Verses in Memory of my Brother John Words
156
Lines written on a Blank Leaf in a Copy of the Authors
163
Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg 173
173
NOTES 186
186
212
212
Appendix 227
227
Dedication prefixed to the Edition of 1815 278
278
Postscript 303
303
328
328
Index to the Poems 839
339
220
346
To the Rev Dr Wordsworth
348
Not envying Latian shades if yet they throw
355

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Page 228 - Yet a little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to sleep : so shall thy poverty come as one that travelleth, and thy want as an armed man.
Page 174 - As to the tabor's sound, To me alone there came a thought of grief: A timely utterance gave that thought relief, And I again am strong: The cataracts blow their trumpets from the steep; No more shall grief of mine the season wrong; I hear the echoes through the mountains throng, The winds come to me from the fields of sleep, And all the earth is gay...
Page 19 - Reaper. Behold her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland Lass! Reaping and singing by herself; Stop here, or gently pass! Alone she cuts and binds the grain, And sings a melancholy strain; O listen! for the Vale profound Is overflowing with the sound.
Page 174 - Ye blessed Creatures, I have heard the call Ye to each other make ; I see The heavens laugh with you in your jubilee ; My heart is at your festival, My head hath its coronal, The fulness of your bliss, I feel - I feel it all.
Page 262 - Duty, if that name thou love, Who art a light to guide, a rod To check the erring, and reprove ; Thou, who art victory and law When empty terrors overawe, From vain temptations dost set free, And calm'st the weary strife of frail humanity ! There are who ask not if thine eye Be on them ; who, in love and truth, Where no misgiving is, rely Upon the genial sense of youth : Glad hearts, without reproach or blot, Who do thy work, and know it not...
Page 179 - But for those first affections, Those shadowy recollections, Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain light of all our day, Are yet a master light of all our seeing; Uphold us, cherish, and have power to make Our noisy years seem moments in the being Of the eternal Silence : truths that wake, To perish never; Which neither listlessness, nor mad endeavor Nor Man nor Boy, Nor all that is at enmity with joy, Can utterly abolish or destroy...
Page 264 - Who, doomed to go in company with Pain, And Fear, and Bloodshed, miserable train ! Turns his necessity to glorious gain ; In face of these doth exercise a power Which is our human nature's highest dower ; Controls them and subdues, transmutes, bereaves Of their bad influence, and their good...
Page 176 - Behold the Child among his new-born blisses, A six years' Darling of a pigmy size ! See, where 'mid work of his own hand he lies, Fretted by sallies of his mother's kisses, With light upon him from his father's eyes...
Page 180 - And O, ye Fountains, Meadows, Hills, and Groves, Forebode not any severing of our loves ! Yet in my heart of hearts I feel your might ; I only have relinquished one delight To live beneath your more habitual sway. I love the Brooks which down their channels fret, Even more than when I tripped lightly as they...
Page 180 - Though nothing can bring back the hour Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower; We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind; In the primal sympathy Which having been must ever be; In the soothing thoughts that spring Out of human suffering; In the faith that looks through death, In years that bring the philosophic mind.

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