Beyond Death: The Mystical Teachings of ʻAyn Al-Quḍāt Al-Hamadhānī

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BRILL, 2010 - 241 pages
The Twelfth-Century Iranian Mystic `Ayn al-Qudat al-Hamadhani (d. 1131) wrote vividly of his explorations of death as a state of consciousness, which he experienced while alive. This state and his visions of Doomsday and the innumerable non-corporeal worlds that lie past the world of matter confront him with paradoxical realties that upset the notional understanding of faith. The present book concerns itself with a discussion on the subject of death as it is viewed by one of the defining mystic scholars of medieval Iran. Based on medieval manuscripts and primary sources in classical Persian and Arabic, this book explores the significance of this important Iranian mystic and his insights on the nature of reality in light of death.

Islamic History and Civilization. Studies and Texts straddles the wide world of Islam, from its earliest appearance until premodern times, and from its western to its eastern boundaries. The series provides space for diachronic studies of a dynasty or region, research into individual themes or issues, annotated translations and text editions, and conference proceedings related to Islamic history.
 

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Contents

Chapter OneʿAyn alQuāts Life Heritage and Heresy
9
Chapter TwoLonging for the Homeland
46
Chapter ThreeDeath and Visions of the Unseen
75
Chapter FourAppearance and Reality
133
Chapter FiveThe Legacy of Ayn alQudat
163
Chapter SixSama
191
Ayn alQudat and Sama
210
Appendix
223
Bibliography
229
Index of Names
237
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About the author (2010)

Firoozeh Papan-Matin, Ph.D. (2003) in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles, has published extensively on topics in Persian literature and Islamic mysticism including "The Unveiling of Secrets" (Kashf al-Asr r): "The Visionary Autobiography of R zbih n al-Baql (A.D. 1128-1209)" (Brill, 2006).

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