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2. Passport.- This document is a demand issued by the government of the country to which the vessel belongs, that the vessel with her crew, passengers, goods, and merchandise shall be allowed free passage without any hindrance, and generally contains the name and residence of the master, the name, construction, and destination of the vessel.

3. Permit for navigation.—This document is issued by the officers of the port where the vessel fitted out for the voyage, and gives her the right to navigate, carrying the flag and passport of the country to which she belongs. The document generally contains the nature, quantity, and owner of the cargo, and the place of destination.

4. Charter party.—This is a contract entered into by the owner or master of a vessel and the person who charters her concerning the hire of the whole or part of the vessel, and generally contains the name of the master, the name and construction of the vessel, the port where she is lying when chartered, the name and residence of the person who chartered her, the nature of the cargo, the ports where it is to be loaded and unloaded, and the freightage.

5. Log book. This is a journal kept by the master of the vessel in accordance with the regulations of the country to which she belongs.

6. Ship’s journal.—This is a journal kept by the master of the vessel to make report to her owner.

7. Contract with the shipbuilder.—This document must be carried by a vessel while there is no change in ownership since her completion, and is used to prove her nationality in case there is no passport, permit for navigation, or certificate of nationality.

8. Assignment. This document proves that the ownershipof a vessel has been transferred to the purchaser.

9. Bills of lading.—These are generally made separately for goods of different shippers. Those remaining on board are duplicates of those which the master has given to the shippers. A bill of lading contains the name of the shipper, date and place of loading, the name and destination of the vessel, the nature, quantity, destination, and freightage of the goods.

10. Invoice.An invoice always accompanies goods and contains details of each bale of goods, the price, freightage, custom duty, and other charges and expenses, and the names and residences of the consignor and consignee.

11. Freight list. This contains the names of the consignor and consignee, the mark and number of each bale, quantity of goods in each bale in detail, and accounts of freightage corresponding to the bill of lading, and signed generally by an agent who manages clearance of vessels, and by the master.

12. Clearance. - This is issued by the officer of the custom-house which the vessel left last, and proves that the custom duty has been paid. It also contains the destination of the vessel and her cargo.

13. Muster roll. — This contains the names of the crew, with their ages, duties, residences, and places of birth.

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14. Shipping papers.—This is a contract signed by every member of of the crew, with details of the limits of the voyage and the period of hire contracted.

15. Bill of health. – This is a certificate testifying that there has been no contagious disease prevailing in the port which the vessel left and that there has been no case of such disease on board the vessel.

CHAPTER IV.-Blockade.

ART. XXI. Blockade is to close an enemy's port, bay, or coast with force, and is effective when the force is strong enough to threaten any vessels that attempt to go in or out of the blockaded port or bay or to approach the blockaded coast.

Temporary evacuation of a blockaded area by a squadron or manof-war on account of bad weather or to attain the object of the blockade does not interfere with the effectiveness of the blockade.

Art. XXII. When a blockade is instituted the commanding officer of the squadron or man-of-war shall issue a declaration of blockade by filling out Form I with the area of blockade and the date of the declaration.

Art. XXIII. When enforcing a new blockade after former blockade has lost its effectiveness, or when there is change in the area of blockade, a new declaration must be made according to the preceding article.

Art. XXIV. When the commanding officer of a squadron or a manof-war declares a blockade, he shall take the following steps:

1. He shall report the declaration of the blockade to the minister of the navy.

2. He shall report the declaration of the blockade to every Japanese minister residing in the countries near the blockaded area, and shall request him to inform the Government of the country and all the foreign ministers and consuls residing in the country to which he is accredited of the establishment of the blockade.

3. He shall communicate the declaration of the blockade to all the foreign consuls residing in neutral districts in the neighborhood of the blockaded area, and shall take any other measures necessary to make known the fact of the blockade.

4. He shall inform as far as possible, by means of a flag of truce, the proper officers and consuls of neutral countries residing within the blockaded area, of the declaration of the blockade.

Art. XXV. In case the master of a vessel receives warning direct from an imperial war vessel, or it is clear that he knows of the existence of the blockade from official or private information or from any other source, such master shall be considered to have received actual notice of the blockade.

Art. XXVI. In the following cases it shall be deemed that notice of the declaration of the blockade has been received :

1. The case in which the master of a vessel is considered to have received a notice of the blockade whether he has actually received it or not, such notice having been sent to the proper authorities of the country to which the vessel belongs, and there having elapsed a sufficient time for the authorities to notify the residents of their nationality.

2. The case in which the master of a vessel is considered to have received a notice of the blockade, the fact of the blockade having been made public.

ART. XXVII. The following vessels shall be considered to have broken through a blockade outward:

1. A vessel that has issued out of the blockaded area or has attempted to do so.

2. A vessel that has transshipped outside the blockaded area the cargo of a vessel that has broken through a blockade outward, or has attempted to make such transshipment.

Art. XXVIII. In any of the following cases the preceding article shall not be applied:

1. When a vessel comes out of the blockade area, having a permit from the Imperial Government or from the commanding officer of the squadron or war vessel on duty blockade.

2. When a vessel which entered the blockaded port during the existence of the blockade, having received no notice of the fact, sails out of the port without any cargo.

3. When a vessel which was in the port at the time of the declaration of the blockade sails out of the port without any cargo.

4. When a vessel which was in the port and was loaded before the declaration of the blockade sails out.

ART. XXIX. Any vessel which has received notification of a blockade shall be considered to have violated the blockade inward in the following cases:

1. When such vessel has passed into the blockaded area or has attempted to do so.

2. When such vessel, lying in the neighborhood of the blockaded area, is considered to be steering into the area, no matter what port of destination is mentioned in the ship's papers.

3. When such vessel has transported or attempted to transport cargo to a blockaded place, by transshipping to another vessel outside of the blockaded area in order that the latter may pass the line of blockade.

4. When such vessel is bound for the blockaded port.

Art. XXX. To vessels coming under one of the following heads, the preceding article shall not apply:

1. When a vessel has permission of the Imperial Government or of the commanding officer of the blockading squadron or man-of-war.

2. When the master of the vessel has ventured to make a blockaded port his destination anticipating termination of the blockade and intending to steer for another port in case the blockade is still in force, or when there are extenuating circumstances and the vessel comes from a very distant place,

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3. When it is clear that the master of a vessel bound for a blockaded port has abandoned the idea of reaching that port.

4. When a vessel enters a blockaded area, it having become necessary to put into port from want of provisions, rough weather, or any other unavoidable circumstances, and there being no other port or bay to

put in.

Art. XXXI. When a blockade is discontinued the commanding offcer of the squadron or the man-of-war shall immediately report it to the minister of the navy and shall take necessary steps to make it generally known.

CHAPTER V.- Visit, search, and capture. ART. XXXII. Any private vessel regarding which there is suspicion which would justify her capture shall be visited and searched no matter of what national character she is.

Art. XXXIII. A neutral vessel under convoy of a war vessel of her country shall not be visited nor searched if the commanding officer of the convoying war vessel presents a declaration signed by himself stating that there is on board the vessel no person, document, or goods that are contraband of war, and that all the ship's papers are perfect, and stating also the last port which the vessel left and her destination. In case of grave suspicion, however, this rule does not apply.

Art. XXXIV. In visiting or searching a neutral mail ship if the mail officer of the neutral country on board the ship swears in a written document that there are no contraband papers in certain mail bags those mail bags shall not be searched. In case of grave suspicion, however, this rule does not apply.

Art. XXXV. All enemy vessels shall be captured. Vessels belonging to one of the following categories, however, shall be exempted from capture if it is clear that they are employed solely for the industry or undertaking for which they are intended:

1. Vessels employed for coast fishery.

2. Vessels making voyage for scientific, philanthropic, or religious purposes.

3. Light-house vessels and tenders.
4. Vessels employed for exchange of prisoners.

Arr. XXXVI. Any vessel of the Empire which carries on commerce with the enemy state or its subjects or makes voyage with such intention shall be captured, unless such vessel has no knowledge of the outbreak of war or has permission from the Imperial Government.

Art. XXXVII. Any vessel that comes under one of the following categories shall be captured, no matter of what national character it is:

1. Vessels that carry persons, papers, or goods that are contraband of war.

2. Vessels that carry no ship’s papers, or have willfully mutilated or thrown them away, or hidden them, or that produce false papers.

3. Vessels that have violated a blockade,

4. Vessels that are deemed to have been fitted out for the enemy's military service.

5. Vessels that engage in scouting or carry information in the interest of the enemy, or are deemed clearly guilty of any other act to assist the enemy.

6. Vessels that oppose visitation or search. 7. Vessels voyaging under the convoy of an enemy's man-of-war.

ART. XXXVIII. Vessels carrying contraband persons, papers, or goods, but which do not know the outbreak of war shall be exempt from capture.

The fact that the master of a vessel does not know the persons, papers, or goods on board to be contraband of war, or that he took them on board under compulsion, shall not exempt the vessel from capture.

Art. XXXIX. Vessels that come under one of the following cases may be captured no matter of what national character they are:

1. When a vessel does not produce the necessary papers or they are not kept in good order..

2. When there are contradictions among the ship's papers or between the statements of the master and the ship's papers.

3. Besides the above two cases, when as the result of visitation or search there is sufficient suspicion to justify capture according to articles from XXXV to XXXVII.

CHAPTER VI.- Disposition of captured vessels and their cargo and persons

on board.

ART. XL. Enemy vessels shall be forfeited.

Of the cargo on board, mentioned in the above clause, enemy goods shall be forfeited. • In case of an armed vessel, however, the whole cargo shall be forfeited.

Art. XLI. Japanese vessels which carry on commerce with the enemy state or its subjects or which are making voyage with such intention shall be forfeited.

Of the cargo on board the vessels mentioned in the above clause, all the goods owned by the owners of the vessels and all the enemy goods shall be forfeited.

ART. XLII. Contraband persons shall be made prisoners and contraband papers

shall be forfeited. Any vessel carrying contraband persons or papers and the goods on board which belong to the owner of such vessel, shall be forfeited, unless the captain proves that not by his own fault he is unacquainted with the fact.

ART. XLIII. Contraband goods and all goods on board belonging to the owner of the contraband shall be forfeited.

When the owner of a vessel carrying contraband is also the owner of the contraband goods, the vessel shall be forfeited.

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