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" that I have fought my last battle. It is a bad thing to be always fighting. While in the thick of it I am too much occupied to feel anything; but it is wretched just after. It is quite impossible to think of glory. Both mind and feelings are exhausted.... "
The Quarterly Review - Page 476
edited by - 1913
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The Diary of Frances Lady Shelley, Volume 1

Lady Frances Shelley - 1912
...wretched just after. It is quite impossible to think of glory. Both mind and feelings are exhausted. I am wretched even at the moment of victory, and I...tries to do the best for them, but how little that is ! At such moments every feeling in your breast is deadened. I am now just beginning to regain my natural...
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The Diary of Frances Lady Shelley, Volume 1

Lady Frances Shelley - 1912 - 406 pages
...wretched just after. It is quite impossible to think of glory. Both mind and feelings are exhausted. I am wretched even at the moment of victory, and I...tries to do the best for them, but how little that is ! At such moments every feeling in your breast is deadened. I am now just beginning to regain my natural...
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The Diary of Frances Lady Shelley ...

lady Frances (Winckley) Shelley - 1912
...wretched just after. It is quite impossible to think of glory. Both mind and feelings are exhausted. I am wretched even at the moment of victory, and I...tries to do the best for them, but how little that is ! At such moments every feeling in your breast is deadened. I am now just beginning to regain my natural...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 219

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle) - 1913
...to enquire what they should do in the event of his being killed, and how with Vol. 210.— No. 4&. 2 K an impassive countenance he told them that his...the best for them, but how little that is ! ' (i, 102). Waterloo conversations were rounded off for the time with a visit to Waterloo itself ; but in...
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The Bookman, Volume 36

1913
...wretched just after. It is quite impossible to think of glory. Both mind and feelings are exhausted. I am wretched even at the moment of victory, and I...tries to do the best for them, but how little that is ! At such moments every feeling in your breast is deadened. I am now just beginning to regain my natural...
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Modern European History

Hutton Webster - 1920 - 671 pages
...foe, the "finest" he had ever seen, a remark which contrasts with Wellington's words after Waterloo that "next to a battle lost the greatest misery is a battle gained." Throughout Napoleon's career, he appears as essentially an adventurer, skirting uneasily the edge of...
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Englische Grammatik für Oberklassen

Gustav Wendt - 1923 - 157 pages
...blew, carried to England tidings of battles won, fortresses taken, provinces added to the Empire. — Next to a battle lost, the greatest misery is a battle gained. — I am, I believe, as strongly attached as any member of this House to the principle of free-trade,...
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Perpetual Youth: An Occult and Historical Romance

Henry Proctor - 1993 - 116 pages
...wretched just after. It is quite impossible to think of glory. Both mind and feelings are exhausted. I am wretched even at the moment of victory, and I...tries to do the best for them, but how little that is! At that moment every feeling in your breast is deadened. I am now just beginning to regain my natural...
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Diplomat's Dictionary

Charles W. Freeman, Jr. - 1994 - 603 pages
...sagacity. Before he has bloodied his blade the enemy state has submitted." Du Mu Victoiy, problems of: "Next to a battle lost, the greatest misery is a battle gained." Wellington Victoiy, problems of: "The problems of victory are more agreeable than those of defeat,...
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Uneasy Rider: The Interstate Way of Knowledge

Mike Bryan - 1997 - 349 pages
...effectively ended Napoleon's career, and induced the victorious Duke of Wellington to write famously, "Next to a battle lost, the greatest misery is a battle gained." More to the point, it temporarily ruined the battlefield for peacetime agriculture. Disgusted, my forebears...
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