The Quarterly Review, Volume 219

Front Cover
William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle)
John Murray, 1913
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Page 173 - I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, That ye tell him, that I am sick of love.
Page 171 - Thou hast made me known to friends whom I knew not. Thou hast given me seats in homes not my own. Thou hast brought the distant near and made a brother of the stranger.
Page 177 - He is there where the tiller is tilling the hard ground and where the pathmaker is breaking stones. He is with them in sun and in shower, and his garment is covered with dust. Put off thy holy mantle and even like him come down on the dusty soil!
Page 175 - Deliverance is not for me in renunciation. I feel the embrace of freedom in a thousand bonds of delight. Thou ever pourest for me the fresh draught of thy wine of various colours and fragrance, filling this earthen vessel to the brim. My world will light its hundred different lamps with thy flame and place them before the altar of thy temple.
Page 242 - ... flowers, which in that heavenly air Bloom the year long ! Nay, barren are those mountains and spent the streams : Our song is the voice of desire, that haunts our dreams, A throe of the heart, Whose pining visions dim, forbidden hopes profound, No dying cadence nor long sigh can sound, For all our art. Alone, aloud in the raptured ear of men We pour our dark nocturnal secret ; and then, As night is withdrawn From these sweet-springing meads and bursting boughs of May, Dream, while the innumerable...
Page 203 - Tu excitas, ut laudare te delectet; quia fecisti nos ad te, et inquietum est cor nostrum, donee requiescat in te.
Page 259 - I was the justest judge that was in England these fifty years. But it was the justest censure in Parliament that was these two hundred years.
Page 141 - The hottest day that ever I felt in my life. This day, much against my will, I did in Drury Lane see two or three houses marked with a red cross upon the doors, and "Lord have mercy upon us !" writ there ; which was a sad sight to me, being the first of the kind that, to my remembrance, I ever saw.
Page 177 - Deliverance ? Where is this deliverance to be found ? Our Master Himself has joyfully taken upon Him the bonds of creation ; He is bound with us all for ever.
Page 483 - Statement exhibiting the moral and material progress and condition of India during the year 1870-71 (ordered by the House of Commons to be printed, 13th June 1872).

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