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SUVENTSERIES

VOLUME LX.

FROM BEGINNING

No. 3600 July 5, 1913

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CONTENTS
The Racial War in the Pacific: An Imperial Peril.
By Archibald Hurd.

FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW
American Affairs. By A. Maurice Low. NATIONAL REVIEW
Color-Bliod. Chapter X. By Alice Perrin. (To be continued.)

TIMES
The Tendencies of Modern Art, By James Bone.

EDINBURGH REVIEW
The Ascendancy of Wordsworth. By E. Cecil Roberts.

CONTEMPORARY REVIEW
The Finger of Mrs. Knox. By E. E. Somerville and Martin Ross.

BLACKWOOD'S MAGAZINE
The Stone Man, By James Stephens.

NATION
Mr. Carnegie's Twelve Million Dollar Dinner.

ACADEMY
The Precisian.

SATURDAY REVIEW

A PAGE OF VERSE
Winter Dusk. By Walter de la Mare.
The Daisy. By Alice Meynell.
A Portrait.

SPECTATOR
BOOKS AND AUTHORS.

VII. VIII. IX.

47 66 58 60

X. XI. XII.

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WINTER DUSK. I)ark frost was in the air without, The dusk was still with cold and

gloom, When less than even a shadow came

And stood within the room.

Till thou shalt grow and fold and be

unfurled Literally between me and the world. Then shall I drink from in beneath a

spring, And from a poet's side shall read his

book. O daisy mine, what will it be to look From God's side even of such a simple thing?

Alice Meynell.

But of the three around the fire,
None turned a questioning head to

look,
Still read a clear voice, on and on,

Still stooped they o'er their book.

The children watched their mother's

eyes Moving on softly line to line; It seemed to listen too—that shade,

Yet made no outward sign.

The fire flames crooned a tiny song, No cold wind noved the wintry tree; The children both in Faerie dreamed

Beside their mother's knee.

And nearer yet that spirit drew Above that heedless one, intent Only on what the simple words

Of her small story meant.

No voiceless sorrow grieved her mind,
No memory her bosom stirred,
Nor dreamed she, as she read to two,

'Twas surely three who heard.

A PORTRAIT.

(After Pope.) O when a Wife at last begins to see Her Husband's not the man he seemed

to be, Brave, tender, chivalrous, heroic,

pure, But half a tyrant, half an epicure; Sharp-tongued if thwarted in

his slightest whim, As if the world were all arranged for

him; In converse commonplace, in habits

gross, Luxurious, idle, querulous, morose;As this blurred portrait proves itself

the Real, Effacing, flouting, her adored Ideal, What wonder if, in dear defeat of

hope, She turns an atheist or a misanthrope; Arraigns the Powers that mocked her

maiden prayer, And e'en in motherhood finds fresh

despair; Still, as she feels her own poor life

undone, Fears to revive the Father in the Son; With wistful terror scans the baby

face And dreads to read th' hereditary

grace; Marks his sweet eyes, those eyes of

heavenly blue, Which seem to say, "If false, then

nothing's true," Then murmurs, "Gracious God, will

he be traitor too?"

Yet when, the story done, she smiled
From face to face, serene and clear,
A love, half dread, sprang up, as she
Leaned close and drew them near.

Walter de la Mare.

THE DAISY. Slight as thou art, thou art enough to

hide, Like all created things, secrets from

me, And stand a barrier to eternity. And I, how can I praise thee well and

wide From where I dwell-upon the hither

side? Thou little reil for so great mystery, When shall I penetrate all things and

thee And then look back? For this I must

abide,

Who but must weep if such a Wife

there be? Who would not shudder if his own

were she? The Spectator.

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THE RACIAL WAR IN THE PACIFIC: AN IMPERIAL

PERIL. “The problem of the new era is the --because they are happening close at problem of the New Pacific and New hand, and we are tempted to attach an Asia, and the problem of the New Pa- exaggerated importance to the shifting cific and New Asia is that of the of the “Balance of Power" in Europe. struggle of the white and yellow peo- A matter of infinitely greater imporples for world supremacy; the vital tance is the Balance of Power in the issue of to-day ... is the Japanese British Empire, and the British Empire programme of Asiatic Imperialism." is overwhelmingly Asiatic and not

A year ago, when this statement was European. Because we live at the made in a lecture in London by a pub- Empire's governmental, financial, comlic-spirited resident of British Colum- mercial, and social centre we are prone bia, it attracted little attention; to-day to forget that the Empire has a cireveryone who has followed the course cumference. If we do not determine of recent events in British Columbia, to see the Empire whole and keep the South Africa, Australia, and New fears, aspirations, and needs of its Zealand-not to mention California, every section within view, we may lose on the one hand, and in Japan, China, some of it. The writing is on the wall. and India on the other, knows that the While Europe is preoccupied with racial question, in which Japanese, the struggle of Slav against Teuton, Chinese, and Indians are all more or and British politicians watchless concerned, is becoming acute. ing the changing scenes on the Euro

A state of racial war already exists pean continent as though no other in the Pacific—the new world of poli- continent existed, incidents are occurtics and commerce. It is a war which ring on the other side of the world may split the British Empire in two. which show unmistakably that the At present it is confined to diplomatic rivalry between the white and yellow channels; but a change in its character peoples is assuming dangerous propor appears inevitable unless the states- tions. While the Imperial Government men in Downing Street raise their is bound to Japan by a defensive eyes from the study of the chart of the alliance, the British peoples whose North Sea and the map of the shores are washed by the Pacific Ocean Balkans.

are becoming increasingly dominated The problem presented by Anglo- by the fear of the "yellow man” as German relations is of vital impor- well as of their fellow subjects of tance; we are interested to

India. This fear, and not the growth extent in the solution of the Balkan of German naval armaments or uncerenigma; but these are not the only tainty as to the future of the little problems for British Statesmanship. If Balkan States, is definitely and rapidly the Empire is an actuality-if we really moulding the destinies of these Dominbelieve in its future, its existence ions on the other side of the world. As must not be forgotten between the a straw indicates the direction of the holding of the too infrequent Imperial wind, so numerous events of recent Conferences. We who live in the

suggest that this antiMother Country are apt to be fas- Asiatic movement will in a short time cinated overmuch by the passing become the determinative factor in events in Europe -the fortunes of Imperial policy, and may eventually Montenegro or the sickness of Turkey prove a root of action surpassing in

some

Occurrence

WINTER DUSK.

Till thou shalt grow and fold and be

unfurled Dark frost was in the air without, The dusk was still with cold and Literally between me and the world.

Then shall I drink from in beneath a gloom,

spring, When less than even a shadow came And stood within the room.

And from a poet's side shall read his

book.

O daisy mine, what will it be to look But of the three around the fire,

From God's side even of such a simple None turned a questioning head to

thing?
look,

Alice Meynell.
Still read a clear voice, on and on,
Still stooped they o'er their book.

A PORTRAIT.
The children watched their mother's

(After Pope.)

O when a Wife at last begins to see eyes Moving on softly line to line;

Her Husband's not the man he seemed It seemed to listen too-that shade,

to be, Yet made no outward sign.

Brave, tender, chivalrous, heroic,

pure, The fire-fames crooned a tiny song,

But half a tyrant, half an epicure; No cold wind voved the wintry tree;

Sharp-tongued if thwarted in his The children both in Faerie dreamed

slightest whim, Beside their mother's knee.

As if the world were all arranged for

him; And nearer yet that spirit drew In converse commonplace, in habits Above that heedless one, intent

gross, Only on what the simple words

Luxurious, idle, querulous, morose;Of her small story meant.

As this blurred portrait proves itself

the Real, No voiceless sorrow grieved her mind, Effacing, fouting, her adored Ideal, No memory her bosom stirred,

What wonder if, in dear defeat of Nor dreamed she, as she read to two,

hope, 'Twas surely three who heard.

She turns an atheist or a misanthrope;

Arraigns the Powers that mocked her Yet when, the story done, she smiled

maiden prayer, From face to face, serene and clear,

And e'en in motherhood finds fresh A love, half dread, sprang up, as she

despair; Leaned close and drew them near.

Still, as she feels her own poor life
Walter de la Mare.

undone,
Fears to revive the Father in the Son;

With wistful terror scans the baby
THE DAISY.

face Slight as thou art, thou art enough to

And dreads to read th' hereditary hide,

grace; Like all created things, secrets from Marks his sweet eyes, those eyes of me,

heavenly blue, And stand a barrier to eternity.

Which seem to say, "If false, then And I, how can I praise thee well and nothing's true," wide

Then murmurs, "Gracious God, will From where I dwell-upon the hither he be traitor too?"

side? Thou little veil for so great mystery, Who but must weep if such a Wife When shall I penetrate all things and there be? thee

Who would not shudder if his own And then look back? For this I must were she? abide,

The Spectator.

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THE RACIAL WAR IN THE PACIFIC: AN IMPERIAL

PERIL. "The problem of the new era is the -because they are happening close at problem of the New Pacific and New hand, and we are tempted to attach an Asia, and the problem of the New Pa- exaggerated importance to the shifting cific and New Asia is that of the of the "Balance of Power" in Europe. struggle of the white and yellow peo- A matter of infinitely greater imporples for world supremacy; the vital tance is the Balance of Power in the issue of to-day . is the Japanese British Empire, and the British Empire programme of Asiatic Imperialism." is overwhelmingly Asiatic and not

A year ago, when this statement was European. Because we live at the made in a lecture in London by a pub- Empire's governmental, financial, comlic-spirited resident of British Colum- mercial, and social centre we are prone bia, it attracted little attention; to-day to forget that Empire has a cir. everyone who has followed the course cumference. If we do not determine of recent events in British Columbia, to see the Empire whole and keep the South Africa, Australia, and New fears, aspirations, and needs of its Zealand—not to mention California, every section within view, we may lose on the one hand, and in Japan, China, some of it. The writing is on the wall. and India on the other, knows that the While Europe is preoccupied with racial question, in which Japanese, the struggle of Slav against Teuton, Chinese, and Indians are all more or and British politicians are watchless concerned, is becoming acute. ing the changing scenes on the Euro

A state of racial war already exists pean continent as though no other in the Pacific—the new world of poli- continent existed, incidents are occurtics and commerce. It is a war which ring on the other side of the world may split the British Empire in two. which show unmistakably that the At present it is confined to diplomatic rivalry between the white and yellow channels; but a change in its character peoples is assuming dangerous proporappears inevitable unless the states- tions. While the Imperial Government men in Downing Street raise their is bound to Japan by a defensive eyes from the study of the chart of the alliance, the British peoples whose North Sea and

the map

of the shores are washed by the Pacific Ocean Balkans.

are becoming increasingly dominated The problem presented by Anglo- by the fear of the "yellow man" as German relations is of vital impor- well as of their fellow subjects of tance; we are interested to

India. This fear, and not the growth extent in the solution of the Balkan of German naval armaments or uncerenigma; but these are not the only tainty as to the future of the little problems for British Statesmanship. If Balkan States, is definitely and rapidly the Empire is an actuality-if we really moulding the destinies of these Dominbelieve in its future, its existence ions on the other side of the world. As must not be forgotten between the a straw indicates the direction of the holding of the too infrequent Imperial wind, so numerous events of recent Conferences. We who live in the occurrence suggest that this antiMother Country are apt to be fas. Asiatic movement will in a short time cinated overmuch by the passing become the determinative factor in events in Europe—the fortunes of Imperial policy, and may eventually Montenegro or the sickness of Turkey prove a root of action surpassing in

some

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