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ences.

Statement of—Continued.

Page

Kramer, Hon. Charles, Member of Congress from California.

776

Kahn, Hon. Florence P., Member of Congress from California

766

Lea, Hon. Clarence F., Member of Congress from California.

762

Lloyd, Hon. Wesley, Member of Congress from Washington..

775

Luckenbach, Edgar F., president Luckenbach Steamship Co., Inc. 616

Marr, George A., vice president, Lake Carriers' Association..

480

McAuliffe, John, president Isthmian Steamship Co.-----

909

McCabe, Emmett, secretary to Hon. John M. Costello, Member of

Congress from California

777

McGrath, Hon. John J., Member of Congress from California. 764
McVay, J. H., Washington, D. C..

783

Milliken, John F., United Licensed Officers of the U. S. A...

748

Moran, Hon. Edward C., Jr., Member of Congress from Maine.. 681

Morewitz, John L., Washington, D. C.--

606, 758

Mott, Hon. James W., Member of Congress from California.

772

Newton, Cleveland, Mississippi Valley Association.

779

O'Brien, Patrick J., vice president, International Seamen's Union of

America

549

Peacock, J. C., Director United States Shipping Board Bureau.

380
Petersen, Capt. W. J., Pacific American Steamship Owners' Asso-
ciation.-

921

Possehl, John, general president International Union of Operating
Engineers

490

Ryan, James W., Isbrandtsen-Moller Co., Inc.

569, 579

Ryons, Lt. Col. Fred B., Military Order of the World War.

477
Sinclair, James, chairman Trans-Atlantic Associated Freight Confer-

920, 988

Smith, H. G., president National Council of American Shipbuilders.. 935

Stebbins, A. D., president Merchants and Miners Transportation Co. 499

Stevens, T. M., Waterman Steamship Co..

845

Stillman, Charles A., vice president, Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. 405

Tolan, Hon. John H., Member of Congress from California.

775

Tomb, Capt. J. H., superintendent New York State Merchant

Marine Academy

586

Tuckwood, O. W., Johns-Manville International Corporation.

495

Wagner, H. J., Director Norfolk (Va.) Port Traffic Commission. 835

Walter, Hon. Francis E., Member of Congress from Pennsylvania.

Welch, Hon. Richard J., Member of Congress from California.-

745

White, John C., American Cotton Shippers' Association.----

597

Zioncheck, Hon. Marion A., Member of Congress from Washington.. 772

PART III. APPENDIX

SUBJECT:

Bland bill (H. R. 7521, first committee print)

1031

Bland bill (H. R. 7521, second committee print).

1046

First Moran bill (H. R. 7854).

1064

Second Moran bill (H. R. 7981)

1078

President's message on Government aid to merchant shipping -

1093

Executive order authorizing Post Office Department to investigate

ocean-mail contracts..

1137

Letters received by committee and amendments proposed on

subject of-

Competition between American-flag services.

1138

Freight and travel agencies.-

1138

Inland water carriers.

1141

Miscellaneous

1142

Navy Department's views.

1147

Port discrimination.

1149

Rate regulation.-

1151

Seamen's legislation.

1178

Ship construction..

1180

Subsidiary companies

1189

Chamber of Commerce of the United States (special report)

1197

Pertinent Facts”, submitted by National Council of American Ship-

builders

1200

A “Flexible” Subsidy (reprint from Marine Progress, March 1935). 1231

The Merchant Marine (radio address of Senator David I. Walsh).. 1236

Ship Subsidies(radio address of Secretary of Commerce Daniel C. Roper). 1239

PART 1. MERCHANT MARINE POLICY

General Hearings on Government Aid to Shipping

TO DEVELOP AN AMERICAN MERCHANT MARINE

PART I. MERCHANT MARINE POLICY

TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1935

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, COMMITTEE ON THE MERCHANT MARINE AND FISHERIES,

Washington, D.C. The committee met at 10 a. m., Hon. Schuyler 0. Bland (chairman) presiding.

The Chairman. Gentlemen, the purpose of the hearing this morning is to secure information which will be necessary later in considering merchant marine legislation which in all probability will be introduced.

I have attended several of the interdepartmental committee hearings and there is also a lot of information that comes in as to the general character of the merchant marine, and different suggestions es to the needs, so that really the matter directed at a particular bill is comparatively limited in scope. In order to secure as much expedition of time as possible, we are going ahead with these hearings before introducing any bill, in order to obtain the benefit of such suggestions 85 may come out and, in addition to that, to find out just what may be in the minds of those who held the interdepartmental hearings and who have suggested changes.

A bill is being prepared and will be considered, although necessarily the time for its consideration must be limited; for, under the provisions of the Independent Offices Appropriations Act of 1934, approved June 16, 1933, the time within which the President is authorized, in his discretion, to modify or cancel ocean mail contracts expires on April 30, 1935, and this matter is dumped into our laps right here at the very last minute and we are going to try to get more information than the message or the reports give us, in order to frame a policy. It is desired that legislation shall be on the statute books by that time, The President's message and accompanying papers have been available for only about 15 days, really less than that time has expired Since the printing of the message but the views of the President, and the Post Office Department and the Interdepartmental Committee are known, and this should enable interested parties, as well as Government officials to express such views as they may have formed, and those may be helpful to the committee.

I have submitted a questionnaire to the Post Office and Commerce Departments and

the answers may help to show the present status of the American Merchant Marine.

it possible.

The answers of the Post Department to this questionnaire are as

follows: QUESTIONNAIRE SUBMITTED BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON MERCHANT

MARINE AND FISHERIES TO THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND THE Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT

1. What are the number and gross tonnage of documented vessels of the United States?

2. What sizes of vessels are included in the documented tonnage? 3. How many officers and seamen are required to navigate these vessels? 4. Of the documented vessels, how many are registered, enrolled, and licensed? 5. How do these figures compare with those of 1914?

6. Of the documented vessels of the United States today, how many are ocean going sizes of 2,000 gross tons and upward?

7. Can you segregate the ocean-going tonnage under the American flag as to its employment?

8. Of the ocean going vessels registered for the foreign trade, how many are certified for operation on ocean-mail routes?

9. How much ocean mail pay did these ships receive for, say, the fiscal year 1934?

10. How much of the tonnage receiving mail pay was purchased from the United States Government?

11. What was the purchase price of this tonnage?
12. What was the original cost of this tonnage?
13. What was the world market value of this tonnage when sold?

14. How much of the tonnage receiving mail pay was built under the construction loan provisions of the 1928 act and what was the cost of these vessels?

15. What percentage of the tonnage certified to operate on ocean mail routes is over 10 years old?

16. What are the ages of vessels purchased from the United States Government which are certified for operation on ocean mail routes?

17. Are these vessels as economical to operate as those built during the last ten years?

18. Do you know the fuel consumption of the Leviathan as compared with the Bremen and other large modern trans-Atlantic liners?

19. Do you know what the volume of ship tonnage is in the world today? 20. How does this compare with the year 1914-before the outbreak of the World War? Can you define the tonnage in existence at the present time as to the types of vessels this tonnage includes?

21. Can you segregate this tonnage further to show what comprises oceangoing vessels of the larger sizes?

22. Have you any idea what part of such ocean-going vessels participate in the international carrying trade?

23. How much of such tonnage is registered under the flags of the six principal maritime countries?

24. How does the United States rank in tonnage among these six countries?

25. How does the United States rank in tonnage of vessels with speed of 12 knots and upward?

26. How does the United States rank in tonnage of vessels 10 years of age or less?

27. What percentage of the water-borne foreign trade of the United States was carried in American ships during the past year?

28. What percentage of this trade was carried in American ships during the past 10 years? (Value.)

29. How does this compare with the decade preceding the World War?

30. When we speak of the percentage of the commerce carried in American ships, does this include every kind of cargo and does it include traffic on the Great Lakes?

31. Can you give figures showing the percentage of our foreign trade carried in American ships segregated to distinguish between the Lakes and ocean traffic?

32. Can you segregate this further to separate that carried by tankers from that transported by cargo vessels and passenger vessels?

33. What was the size of our merchant marine operating in regular services in 1914?

34. What is the size of our merchant marine operating in regular services today?

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