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cent and 8.54 per cent of fat respectively. No injurious substances were found in any of the samples.

Insect powder.-One sample of insect powder, suspected to contain poison, was examined with a negative result.

Meat, chopped. Of the 10 samples of chopped meat examined, 2 were found to contain sulphite of soda. Both of these adulterated samples were procured from the same dealer. Prosecution was instituted, and the defendant forfeited a collateral of $5.

Medicine.—A sample of medicine, prepared by a druggist from a physician's prescription, was examined because of complaint that the purchaser had been severely burned in and about the mouth after taking a portion of the prescribed dose. The prescription called for fluid extract of digitalis, and strychnia sulphate dissolved in aromatic elixir, the potent drugs being prescribed in proper doses. An analysis of the medicine showed the same to contain 50 per cent of cresols. No strychnia, digitalin, or aromatic elixir was present in the compound.

Seasoning powder. -A sample of seasoning powder, intended to be used in the preparation of chopped meat, was examined for preservatives or other harmful substances. No injurious substance was found.

Vinegar.-Fifty-six samples of vinegar were examined. None was found to be adulterated.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

These consisted of a sample of sausage containing strychnia sulphate, the same having been used to poison a dog; drip water from a refrigerator, suspected to contain strychnia, none being found. Twenty-three samples of cocaine were examined in order to prove their identity as such, for purposes of prosecution in the police court. Of the 23 samples, 11 were procured by the police department from street vendors who make it their business to sell cocaine to the lower classes. The 11 samples represent 2 cases, and a fine of $200 was imposed in each case. One sample was purchased from a drug store. The proprietor forfeited a collateral of $200. The remaining 11 samples represent 3 cases, 2 against physicians and 1 against a drug firm. The physicians forfeited $25 callateral each, and the firm, composed of three members, forfeited $150 collateral. A sample of "hop,” or opium prepared for smoking purposes, was purchased from a Chinaman and subjected to analysis to determine its identity and morphine content. It proved to be an opium compound containing 9.735 per cent of morphine. The case was prosecuted, and a collateral of $25 was required of the Chinaman. A shirt and overcoat removed from a suspected rapist were examined for blood stains, with a negative result. *A sample of sherry wine suspected to contain poison was examined and found to be colored with a harmless coal-tar dye. No poison was found therein.

An oyster knife suspected to have been used in committing a murder was examined for blood stains. No blood stains were found thereon.

A pocketknife, hat, overcoat, and shoe belonging to a suspected murderer were examined for blood stains. Such stains were found on the knife and hat. No blood stains were found on the shoe and overcoat. Scrapings from the nails on his hands were also examined and blood was found thereon.

A sample of meat and earth suspected to contain poison was examined with negative results.

EXAMINATIONS FOR CORONER.

Specimens of viscera removed from the human body in a case of death from poisoning on examination showed the presence of 0.0328 grams of strychnia.

Recommendations. It is again recommended that provision be made for the services of a laborer in the chemical laboratory; that a horse and wagon be procured for use in the service of said laboratory in order to enable inspectors to collect and deliver in a proper manner samples of milk and cream, and to facilitate the collection of samples of water, etc., and for such other work in connection with the laboratory as occasion may require. Respectfully, R. L. LYNCH, Phar. D., M, D.,

Chemist. or unwrapped. WOODWARD, M. D.,

bia. Nothing was discoveredrict of Columbia. strate the impracticability of Wawe previous to its delivery by the bakers. was found to be in much better condition at hours than the unwrapped bread, and in equally as the fresh loaves.

Butterine.—Two samples of butterine, submitted by the clerk for the purpose of determining their relative value as were examined. The analysis showed that

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Water.

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Sample A contained.
Sample B contained.

Per cent. Per cent. Per cent.
7.51

3. 45 89. 04
11. 42
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83.16

Candy.-Just previous to the advent of the Christmas holidays, 72 samples of assorted candies were examined. No injurious substance was found in any sample.

Celery.—Two samples of celery, suspected to have been treated with paris green, were examined. They were found to be free from contamination with the suspected substance.

Cider.One sample of cider, suspected to contain an excessive amount of alcohol, was examined. The analysis showed it to contain of alcohol, by weight, 1.97 per cent; by volume, 2.05 per cent. It could not be classed, therefore, as an intoxicating beverage.

Ice.A sample of manufactured ice procured from a wagon on the street was found, on analysis, to be contaminated with organic matter, probably of vegetable origin. An inspection of the ice plant revealed an insanitary condition which was corrected, after action by this department.

Ice cream.—Six samples of ice cream were examined, two of which were procured from push carts, and were found to contain 2.43 per

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APPENDIX C.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF LIVE STOCK AND DAIRY FARMS.

WASHINGTON, June 30, 1908. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report on the inspection of live stock and dairy farms for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1908: Number of dairy farms in the District of Columbia.... Number of inspections of dairy farms in the District of Columbia.

1,095 Number of cows on dairy farms in the District of Columbia.....

734 Number of inspections of cows on dairy farms in the District of Columbia..... 11, 144 Number of cows condemned as unfit for dairy purposes on dairy farms in the

District of Columbia....

62

43

1,349

6,428

Cause of condemnations:
Tuberculosis...

35 Diseases of the udder..

7 Other causes.... Number of dairy farms in Virginia shipping milk into the District of Columbia. 302 Number of inspections of dairy farms in Virginia shipping milk into the Dis

trict of Columbia..... Number of cows on dairy farms in Virginia shipping milk into the District of

Columbia.. Number of inspections of cows on dairy farms in Virginia shipping milk into the District of Columbia....

27, 548 Number of cows condemned as unfit for dairy purposes on dairy farms in Virginia shipping milk into the District of of Columbia....

78 Cause of condemnation: Tuberculosis...

52 Diseases of the udder.

23 Other causes...

3 Number of dairy farms in Maryland shipping milk into the District of Columbia......

514 Number of inspections of dairy farms in Maryland shipping milk into the District of Columbia....

1,935 Number of cows on dairy farms in Maryland shipping milk into the District of Columbia....

8, 448 Number of inspections of cows on dairy farms in Maryland shipping milk into the District of Columbia....

33, 788 Number of cows condemned as unfit for dairy purposes on dairy farms in Maryland shipping milk into the District of Columbia..

103 Cause of condemnation: Tuberculosis.....

92 Diseases of udder...

10 Other causes.

1

63

12

12

137

Number of dairy farms in Pennsylvania shipping cream into the District of

Columbia..
Number of inspections of dairy farms in Pennsylvania shipping cream into the

District of Columbia....
Number of cows on dairy farms in Pennsylvania shipping cream into the Dis-

trict of Columbia...
Number of inspections of cows on dairy farms in Pennsylvania shipping cream

into the District of Columbia.... Number of cows condemned as unfit for dairy purposes on dairy farms in Penn

sylvania shipping cream into the District of Columbia.. Cause of condemnation: Tuberculosis.......

137

1

16

16

Number of dairy farms in New York shipping cream into the District of

Columbia...
Number of inspections of dairy farms in New York shipping cream into the

District of Columbia...
Number of cows on dairy farms in New York shipping cream into the District

of Columbia...
Number of inspections of cows on dairy farms in New York shipping cream

into the District of Columbia.....

525

525

Number of cows condemned as unfit for dairy purposes on dairy farms in New

York shipping cream into the District of Columbia...

7

Cause of condemnation:

Tuberculosis....
Diseases of udder..

1 6

904 4,407 16, 172 73, 142

220

Total number of dairy farms inspected....
Total number of inspections of dairy farms..
Total number of cows on dairy farms...
Total number of inspections of cows.
Total number of cows condemned as unfit for dairy purposes.
Number of small slaughterhouses operating irregularly in the District of Co-

lumbia...
Number of inspections of stock yards and slaughterhouses..
Number of animals slaughtered under inspection...

20 408

1,537

Cattle...
Hogs.
Sheep.
Calves...

192 446 405 494

Number of animals condemned and tanked as unfit for food...

18

Cattle..
Hogs.
Sheep.
Calves..

9 5 0

The foregoing report shows a synopsis of the work performed during the fiscal year by the six veterinary inspectors of the health department, Doctors Ashworth, Drake, Grapp, Rome, Turner, and Young. All dairy farms in the District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania supplying milk or cream' to the city of Washington have been regularly inspected during the past year. The appointment of an extra inspector stationed at Frederick, Md. has made this work possible. The territory from which milk is produced is now divided into six inspection districts, each inspector being given a certain number of farms which he is required to visit regularly.

Each year shows a marked improvement in the conditions obtaining on the dairy farms throughout the milk-producing sections of the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. Many new barns are reported being erected in each inspection district and many other barns have been remodeled. Dairies and wash rooms are now found on all dairy farms, where formerly the opposite condition prevailed to a great extent. During the year hundreds of farmers have put large boilers in their wash rooms or dairies for the purpose of properly cleansing milk receptacles. During the present summer much attention has been given to properly screening dairies from flies. Cement floors for barns and dairies are growing more in favor each year among the milk producers. The inspectors are encouraging these changes and in many cases their advice is sought by the farmers in building new barns and remodeling old ones. In many cases plans for dairies and barns have been furnished the farmers. The practice of tuberculin testing dairy herds in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia is becoming more general. When last year's report was submitted 55 herds, numbering 941 cows, had been tuberculin tested by the Bureau of Animal Industry, with 159 reactions, or a total of 163 per cent of diseased cows in those herds tested.

At this writing (September 1, 1908) 79 herds, numbering 2,251 cows, have been tuberculin tested by the Bureau of Animal Industry. Of this number 384 have reacted to the tuberculin, or 17 per cent of diseased cows have been found in the herds tested. During the period 670 cows have been given the annual retest with tuberculin, with a loss of 22 cows, or slightly over 3 per cent loss. It is again recommended that all cows in the District of Columbia be tuberculin tested and some compensation given the owners for cows destroyed after reacting to tuberculin.

When this practice is adopted the entrance of cows into the District of Columbia should be prohibited, save they be tuberculin tested, the only exception to this order being cows intended for immediate slaughter.

SLAUGHTERHOUSE INSPECTIONS.

Most of the slaughtering of cattle is now done at abattoirs having United States inspection, either in the District of Columbia or just across the line in Virginia. There are yet 20 small slaughterhouses in operation at irregular periods in the District. These have been inspected as often as practicable. The inspection has caused a marked improvement in the conditions existing in most of them. It has been necessary to bring prosecutions in three cases to secure results. Their operation under the present laws is detrimental to the public health, owing to the fact that the slaughtering of animals is done at very irregular periods and often at night, hence the inspectors see but very few of the animals slaughtered; furthermore, the small number of animals slaughtered at each place does not warrant the proprietors putting their places in such a sanitary condition as is now demanded by modern hygienic practice. Most of the animals slaughtered at the places are sheep and calves, although a large number of cows find their way to these places, frequently because they are in such a diseased condition that they would be condemned

71552—D C 1908—VOL 3

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