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1. Brown del.

11 Delatre c. BELLAMY's APOLOGY Vol.v.

Despondency on the Sheps of Mestminster Bridgeca,

Printed for J.Bell British Library Strand London March 14 1786..

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To which is annexed,
Her original Letter to JOHN CALCRAFT, Efq.
advertised to be published in October 1767,

but which was then violently suppressed.

« The Web of our Life is of a mingled Yarn, Good and Ill

“ together; our Virtues would be proud, if our Faults whipe
“ them not; and our Crimes would despair, if they were not
“ cherished by our Virtues."

All's Well that Ends Well, Act 4, Scene lii.

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And fold by J. BELL, at the Britih Library, STRAND.

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MDCCLXXXVI.

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December 22, 17I NOW found all my theatrical expectations frustrated. Although, but a few days before, they seemed to be resuming their wonted fplendour, and bid fair to be productive of at least some years of unclouded sunshine, in a moment an envious gloom darkened the prospect. Transient, as 66 when a sable cloud turns forth her silver lining “ to the night," was the flattering hope. But such was my lot.

I could by no means have wished for an engagement, unless it was on condition of being reinVOL. v.

B

stated

stated in most of the parts that had been in my poflession, together with my quota of new ones;

and as to requesting a favour of that kind from Mr. Woodward, I reprobated the very thought. I could not for a moment suppose, even had I been fo unreasonable as to make such a weak proposal, that a person who knew the value of money fo well as he did, would have consented to have me (to make use of a political phrase) tacked to him by way of dependent,

For notwithstanding friendship is a very fine thing to talk of, very few would prove such devotees to it, as to sacrifice a thousand pounds a year upon account of it. As for my own ideas of that facred union, they are so truly romantic, and so very unfashionable, that I am almost ashamed to make them known: but I should not think worlds too dear a purchase, for the person towards whom I professed a friendship. I now regretted, more poignantly than before, that I had made Mr. Colman my enemy. Though I deplored his resentment, I acknowledged the justice of it. I have, however, the consolation to add, that from that gentleman's liberal behaviour for some time past, I have every reason to believe his displeasure has subsided, and that I have the happiness, once

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