The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques & Discoveries of the English Nation: Made by Sea Or Over-land to the Remote and Farthest Distant Quarters of the Earth at Any Time Within the Compasse of These 1600 Yeeres, Issue 12

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J. MacLehose and sons, 1905
 

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Page 79 - Never, lago. Like to the Pontic sea, Whose icy current and compulsive course Ne'er feels retiring ebb, but keeps due on To the Propontic and the Hellespont...
Page 69 - And who, in time, knows whither we may vent The treasure of our tongue, to what strange shores This gain of our best glory shall be sent, T' enrich unknowing nations with our stores?
Page 79 - It gives me wonder great as my content To see you here before me. O my soul's joy ! If after every tempest come such calms, May the winds blow till they have waken'd death.
Page x - By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster with fire and smoke, and then the...
Page xix - VII. who then reigned, insomuch that all men with great admiration affirmed it to be a thing more divine than human, to sail by the west into the east where spices grow, by a way that was never known before...
Page 84 - Then glut thy sorrow on a morning rose, Or on the rainbow of the salt sand-wave, Or on the wealth of globed peonies ; Or if thy mistress some rich anger shows, Emprison her soft hand, and let her rave, And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes.
Page 76 - I into Egypt and Arabia, And here, not far from Alexandria, Whereas the Terrene and the Red Sea meet, Being distant less than full a hundred • leagues, I meant to cut a channel to them both, ! That men might quickly sail to India.
Page xxi - I have never either read or heard of fresh water coming in so large a quantity, in close conjunction with the water of the sea ; the idea is also corroborated by the blandness of the temperature ; and if the water of which I speak does not proceed from the Earthly Paradise, it appears to be still more marvellous, for I do not believe that there is any river in the world so large or so deep.
Page 43 - Apollo's sacred tree, You it may see A poet's brows To crown, that may sing there. Thy voyages attend, Industrious Hakluyt, Whose reading shall inflame Men to seek fame, And much commend, To after times thy wit.
Page 74 - Shall I make spirits fetch me what I please, Resolve me of all ambiguities, Perform what desperate enterprise I will? I'll have them fly to India for gold, Ransack the ocean for orient pearl, And search all corners of the new-found world For pleasant fruits and princely delicates...