The Rise of Modern Judicial Review: From Constitutional Interpretation to Judge-made Law

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 1994 - 447 pages
This major history of judicial review, revised to include the Rehnquist court, shows how modern courts have used their power to create new "rights with fateful political consequences." Originally published by Basic Books.
 

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Contents

IV
17
V
18
VI
20
VII
24
VIII
37
IX
39
XI
41
XII
51
LVIII
219
LIX
222
LX
223
LXIII
230
LXIV
239
LXV
241
LXVI
242
LXVII
248

XIII
56
XIV
63
XV
71
XVI
73
XVII
74
XVIII
76
XIX
80
XX
84
XXI
90
XXIII
97
XXIV
101
XXV
116
XXVI
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XXVII
123
XXIX
127
XXX
131
XXXI
138
XXXII
140
XXXIII
144
XXXIV
148
XXXV
150
XXXVI
153
XXXVII
156
XXXVIII
160
XXXIX
164
XL
166
XLI
168
XLII
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XLIII
170
XLIV
172
XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
182
XLVIII
184
XLIX
188
L
192
LI
195
LII
199
LIII
205
LV
207
LVI
209
LVII
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LXVIII
256
LXIX
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LXX
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LXXI
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LXXII
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LXXIII
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LXXIV
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LXXV
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LXXVI
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LXXVII
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LXXVIII
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LXXIX
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LXXX
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LXXXI
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LXXXII
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LXXXIII
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LXXXIV
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LXXXV
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LXXXVI
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LXXXVII
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LXXXVIII
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LXXXIX
323
XC
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XCI
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XCII
329
XCIII
336
XCIV
343
XCV
352
XCVI
359
XCVII
360
XCVIII
365
XCIX
369
C
377
CI
379
CII
381
CIII
384
CIV
397
CV
403
CVI
433
CVII
441
CVIII
445
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Christopher Wolfe is Professor of Political Science at Marquette University.

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