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Of equal importance, the President's U.N. speech articulated a clear, decisive, and timely U.S. policy on Iraq, that is, to remove the threat before Iraq is able to use weapons of mass destruction now in its arsenal and every day being added to the arsenal. The U.S. is now firmly on a course to accomplish this policy and invites the nations of the world to join.

I remind my colleagues that the President's policy of regime change is the same policy that Congress adopted with the unanimous support of the Senate in October of 1998 and the policy that President Clinton later endorsed and vigorously defended.

Over the past several weeks, many Members of Congress and many American citizens have expressed their hope for meaningful consultations between Congress and the President, as well as consultations with our allies and the United Nations. Our President has done exactly that. It is now time for Congress to express to the people of our Nation and to the world its support squarely and overwhelming behind our President as he leads the international community. The price of inaction is far too great if the international community fails to confront this danger now, once and for all.

By bringing his case to the U.N., President Bush clearly demonstrated his belief that the effort to counter Saddam Hussein is an international responsibility. The United States strongly desires multilateral action. But if the U.N. fails to act, the United States, like all other member nations under the U.N. Charter, reserves unto itself the right to take whatever action is necessary to protect our people and our Nation from the threat of Saddam Hussein.

Predictably, the Iraqi regime has responded to the President's speech with a tactical move designed to fracture the consensus that was forming in the United Nations. It is merely a trap, in my opinion, to buy more time for Saddam Hussein to further delay compliance with international mandates, as expressed in the 16 U.N. Security Council resolutions. I shall not recite those resolutions, but just place them in the record.

[The information referred to follows:]

Saddam Hussein's Defiance of United Nations Resolutions

Saddam Hussein has repeatedly violated each of the following resolutions..

UNSCR 678 - November 29, 1990

• Iraq must comply fully with UNSCR 660 (regarding Iraq's illegal

invasion of Kuwait) "and all subsequent relevant resolutions."

• Authorizes UN Member States "to use all necessary means to uphold

and implement resolution 660 and all subsequent relevant
resolutions and to restore international peace and security in the
area."

UNSCR 686 - March 2, 1991

• Iraq must release prisoners detained during the Gulf War.

• Iraq must return Kuwaiti property seized during the Gulf War.

• Iraq must accept liability under international law for damages from

its illegal invasion of Kuwait.

UNSCR 687 - April 3, 1991

• Iraq must "unconditionally accept" the destruction, removal or

rendering harmless "under international supervision" of all "chemical and biological weapons and all stocks of agents and all related subsystems and components and all research, development, support and manufacturing facilities."

• Iraq must "unconditionally agree not to acquire or develop nuclear weapons or nuclear-weapons-usable material" or any research, development or manufacturing facilities.

Iraq must "unconditionally accept" the destruction, removal or
rendering harmless "under international supervision of all "ballistic
missiles with a range greater than 150 KM and related major parts
and repair and production facilities."

• Iraq must not "use, develop, construct or acquire" any weapons of

mass destruction.

• Iraq must reaffirm its obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation

Treaty.

• Creates the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM) to verify

the elimination of Iraq's chemical and biological weapons programs
and mandated that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
verify elimination of Iraq's nuclear weapons program.

• Iraq must declare fully its weapons of mass destruction programs.

• Iraq must not commit or support terrorism, or allow terrorist

organizations to operate in Iraq.

• Iraq must cooperate in accounting for the missing and dead Kuwaitis

and others.

• Iraq must return Kuwaiti property seized during the Gulf War.

UNSCR 688 - April 5, 1991

• "Condemns" repression of Iraqi civilian population, "the

consequences of which threaten international peace and security."

• Iraq must immediately end repression of its civilian population.

• Iraq must allow immediate access to international humanitarian

organizations to those in need of assistance.

UNSCR 707 - August 15, 1991

• "Condemns" Iraq's "serious violation" of UNSCR 687.

• "Further condemns" Iraq's noncompliance with IAEA and its

obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

• Iraq must halt nuclear activities of all kinds until the Security Council

deems Iraq in full compliance.

• Iraq must make a full, final and complete disclosure of all aspects of

its weapons of mass destruction and missile programs.

• Iraq must allow UN and IAEA inspectors immediate, unconditional

and unrestricted access.

• Iraq must cease attempts to conceal or move weapons of mass

destruction, and related materials and facilities.

• Iraq must allow UN and IAEA inspectors to conduct inspection flights

throughout Iraq.

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• Iraq must provide transportation, medical and logistical support for

UN and IAEA inspectors.

UNSCR 715 - October 11, 1991

• Iraq must cooperate fully with UN and IAEA Inspectors.

UNSCR 949 - October 15, 1994

• "Condemns" Iraq's recent military deployments toward Kuwait.

• Iraq must not utilize its military or other forces in a hostile manner

to threaten its neighbors or UN operations in Iraq.

• Iraq must cooperate fully with UN weapons Inspectors.
• Iraq must not enhance its military capability in southern Iraq.

UNSCR 1051 - March 27, 1996

• Iraq must report shipments of dual-use items related to weapons of

mass destruction to the UN and IAEA.

• Iraq must cooperate fully with UN and IAEA inspectors and allow

immediate, unconditional and unrestricted access.

UNSCR 1060 - June 12, 1996

• "Deplores“ Iraq's refusal to allow access to UN inspectors and Iraq's

"clear violations" of previous UN resolutions.

• Iraq must cooperate fully with UN weapons inspectors and allow

immediate, unconditional and unrestricted access.

UNSCR 1115 - June 21, 1997

• "Condemns repeated refusal of Iraqi authorities to allow access" to

UN inspectors, which constitutes a "clear and flagrant violation" of
UNSCR 687, 707, 715, and 1060.

• Iraq must cooperate fully with UN weapons inspectors and allow

immediate, unconditional and unrestricted access.

• Iraq must give immediate, unconditional and unrestricted access to

Iraqi officials whom UN inspectors want to interview,

UNSCR 1134 - October 23, 1997

• "Condemns repeated refusal of Iraqi authorities to allow access" to

UN inspectors, which constitutes a "flagrant violation" of UNSCR 687, 707, 715, and 1060.

• Iraq must cooperate fully with UN weapons inspectors and allow

immediate, unconditional and unrestricted access.

Iraq must give immediate, unconditional and unrestricted access to
Iragi officials whom UN Inspectors want to interview.

UNSCR 1137 - November 12. 1997

• "Condemns the continued violations by Iraq" of previous UN

resolutions, including its "implicit threat to the safety of" aircraft
operated by UN inspectors and its tampering with UN inspector
monitoring equipment.

• Reaffirms Iraq's responsibility to ensure the safety of UN inspectors.

• Iraq must cooperate fully with UN weapons inspectors and allow

immediate, unconditional and unrestricted access.

UNSCR 1154 - March 2, 1998

• Iraq must cooperate fully with UN and IAEA weapons inspectors and

allow immediate, unconditional and unrestricted access, and notes that any violation would have the "severest consequences for Iraq."

UNSCR 1194 - September 9, 1998

• "Condemns the decision by Irag of 5 August 1998 to suspend

cooperation with" UN and IAEA inspectors, which constitutes "a
totally unacceptable contravention" of its obligations under UNSCR
687, 707, 715, 1060, 1115, and 1154.

• Iraq must cooperate fully with UN and IAEA weapons inspectors, and

allow immediate, unconditional and unrestricted access.

UNSCR 1205 - November 5, 1998

• "Condemns the decision by Irag of 31 October 1998 to cease

cooperation" with UN inspectors as "a flagrant violation" of UNSCR
687 and other resolutions.

• Iraq must provide "immediate, complete and unconditional

cooperation" with UN and IAEA inspectors.

UNSCR 1284 - December 17, 1999

• Created the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspections

Commission (UNMOVIC) to replace previous weapon inspection team (UNSCOM).

• Irag must allow UNMOVIC "immediate, unconditional and

unrestricted access" to Iraqi officials and facilities.

• Iraq must fulfill its commitment to return Gulf War prisoners.

• Calls on Iraq to distribute humanitarian goods and medical supplies

to its people and address the needs of vulnerable Iraqis without
discrimination.

Senator WARNER. How will we explain to the American people, if, in the wake of a future attack on the United States or U.S. interests, directly by Saddam Hussein or indirectly through surrogate terrorists equipped and directed by him, that we knew Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction, that we knew he intended to manufacture and acquire even more and to use these weapons, and yet, at this time, we failed to act? Now, more than ever before, Congress, as an equal branch of the Government, must join our President and support the course he has set. We have to demonstrate a resolve within our Nation and internationally that communicates to Saddam Hussein that enough is enough. He has to be convinced that American and international resolve is real, unshakable, and enforceable if there's to be hope of any progress of disarmament of his weapons of mass destruction.

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