An Alpine tale. By the author of 'Tales from Switzerland'.

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Page 263 - To sit on rocks, to muse o'er flood and fell, To slowly trace the forest's shady scene, Where things that own not man's dominion dwell, And mortal foot hath ne'er or rarely been ; To climb the trackless mountain all unseen, With the wild flock that never needs a fold ; Alone o'er steeps and foaming falls to lean ; This is not solitude; 'tis but to hold Converse with Nature's charms, and view her stores unroll'd.
Page 183 - These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine.
Page 200 - Flowers of all hue, and without thorn the rose : Another side, umbrageous grots and caves Of cool recess, o'er which the mantling vine Lays forth her purple grape, and gently creeps Luxuriant...
Page 144 - O'er all the mountain-tops: — 'tis done ; The deluge ceases ; bold and bright The rainbow shoots from hill to hill ; Down sinks the sun ; on presses night ; — Mont Blanc is lovely still. There take thy stand, my spirit ; — spread The world of shadows at thy feet ; And mark how calmly, overhead, The stars like saints in glory meet : While hid in solitude sublime, Methinks I muse on Nature's tomb, And hear the passing foot of Time Step through the gloom.
Page 100 - Delightful task! to rear the tender thought, To teach the young idea how to shoot...
Page 76 - O, how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields ; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of heaven, O how canst thou renounce, and hope to be forgiven...
Page 198 - Imbrown'd the noontide bowers; thus was this place A happy rural seat of various view; Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm; Others whose fruit, burnish'd with golden rind, Hung amiable, Hesperian fables true, If true, here only, and of delicious taste...
Page 43 - For unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake ; 30 Having the same conflict "which ye saw in me, and now hear to be in me.
Page 200 - The birds their choir apply ; airs, vernal airs, Breathing the smell of field and grove, attune The trembling leaves, while universal Pan, Knit with the Graces and the Hours in dance, Led on the eternal Spring.
Page 62 - I will pour water upon him that is thirsty, And floods upon the dry ground: I will pour my spirit upon thy seed, And my blessing upon thine offspring: And they shall spring up as among the grass, As willows by the water courses.

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