Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

LEGISLATION ON THE INDOCHINA WAR

BEFORE THE

4 - OCT 19

HEARINGS
Cody

SUBCOMMITTEE ON ASIAN AND

PACIFIC AFFAIRS

[ocr errors]

OF THE

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

NINETY-SECOND CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION

JUNE 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, AND JULY 12, 1971

Printed for the use of the Committee on Foreign Affairs

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1971

65-972

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office

Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $1.26

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS

THOMAS E. MORGAN, Pennsylvania, Chairman
CLEMENT J. ZABLOCKI, Wisconsin WILLIAM S. MAILLIARD, California
WAYNE L. HAYS, Ohio

PETER H. B. FRELINGHUYSEN, New Jersey L. H. FOUNTAIN, North Carolina

WILLIAM S. BROOMFIELD, Michigan DANTE B. FASCELL, Florida

J. IRVING WHALLEY, Pennsylvania
CHARLES C. DIGGS, JR., Michigan H. R. GROSS, Iowa
CORNELIUS E. GALLAGHER, New Jersey EDWARD J. DERWINSKI, Ilinois
ROBERT N. C. NIX, Pennsylvania

F. BRADFORD MORSE, Massachusetts JOHN S. MONAGAN, Connecticut

VERNON W. THOMSON, Wisconsin
DONALD M. FRASER, Minnesota

JAMES G. FULTON, Pennsylvania
BENJAMIN S. ROSENTHAL, New York PAUL FINDLEY, Illinois
JOHN C. CULVER, Iowa

JOHN BUCHANAN, Alabama
LEE H. HAMILTON, Indiana

SHERMAN P. LLOYD, Utah ABRAHAM KAZEN, JR., Texas

J. HERBERT BURKE, Florida LESTER L. WOLFF, New York

SEYMOUR HALPERN, New York JONATHAN B. BINGHAM, New York GUY VANDER JAGT, Michigan GUS YATRON, Pennsylvania

ROBERT H. STEELE, Connecticut
ROY A. TAYLOR, North Carolina

PIERRE S. DU PONT, Delaware
JOHN W. DAVIS, Georgia
MORGAN F. MURPHY, Illinois
RONALD V. DELLUMS, California

Roy J. BULLOCK, Staf Administrator

SUBCOMMITTEE ON ASIAN AND PACIFIC AFFAIRS

CORNELIUS E. GALLAGHER, New Jersey, Chairman LEE H. HAMILTON, Indiana

WILLIAM S. BROOMFIELD, Michigan CHARLES C. DIGGS, JR., Michigan J. IRVING WHALLEY, Pennsylvania LESTER L. WOLFF, New York

VERNON W. THOMSON, Wisconsin ABRAHAM KAZEN, JR., Texas

J. HERBERT BURKE, Florida JOHN W. DAVIS, Georgia

SEYMOUR HALPERN, New York
MORGAN F. MURPHY, Illinois

PIERRE S. DU PONT, Delaware
CHARLES P. WITTER, Subcommittee Staf Consultant

JEAN BROWN, Staff Assistant

(IT)

KF22

7638

19216

CONTENTS

Page

LIST OF WITNESSES
sday, June 22, 1971:
Dow, Hon. John J., a Representative in Congress from the State of

New York.

McClory, Hon. Robert, a Representative in Congress from the State

of Illinois.

Montgomery, Hon. G. V. (Sonny), a Representative in Congress

from the State of Mississippi.-

Rosenthal, Hon. Benjamin S., a Representative in Congress from the

State of New York..

Wolff, Hon. Lester L., a Representative in Congress from the State of

New York.

Wednesday, June 23, 1971:

Buchanan, Hon. John, a Representative in Congress from the State

of Alabama...

Dow, Hon. John J., a Representative in Congress from the State of

New York.

Matsunaga, Hon. Spark M., a Representative in Congress from the

State of Hawaii.

Robison, Hon. Howard W., a Representative in Congress from the

State of New York..

Thursday, June 24, 1971:

Abourezk, Hon. James, a Representative in Congress from the State

of South Dakota..

Abzug, Hon. Bella, a Representative in Congress from the State of

New York.-

Anderson, Hon. John B., a Representative in Congress from the State

of Illinois.

Leggett, Hon. Robert L., a Representative in Congress from the State

of California

Pepper, Hon. Claude, a Representative in Congress from the State of

Florida.

Tues lay, June 29, 1971:

Bingham, Hon. Jonathan B., a Representative in Congress from the

State of New York.

Gibbons, Hon. Sam M., a Representative in Congress from the State

of Florida.

McCloskey, Hon. Paul N., a Representative in Congress from the

State of California

Ryan, Hon. William F., a Representative in Congress from the State

of New York

Waldie, Hon. Jerome R., a Representative in Congress from the State

of California

Wed nesday, June 30, 1971:

Fraser, Hon. Donald M., a Representative in Congress from the State

of Minnesota...

Keith, Hon. Hastings, a Representative in Congress from the State of

Massachusetts..

Monday, July 12, 1971:

Green, Hon. Marshall, A-sistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific

Affairs, Department of State.-

(III)

120

20

7

26

30

52

54

56

62

76

Table submitted by Congressman Rosenthal showing total allied casualties

from 1969–March 1971..
Article from the Washington Post entitled "Viet Politicking: U.S. Plane,

U.S. Adviser and Thieu's Man”.
Letter submitted by Congressman Wolff from Major General Edward G.

Lansdale, USAF Ret --
Poll from Opinion Research Corp., Princeton, New Jersey, submitted by

Congressman Buchanan...
Article from the Washington Post entitled “VC Would Liquidate 3 Million

If It Won, U.S. Expert Contends”.
Report submitted to Congressman Buchanan by the Office of the Secretary

of Defense concerning Vietnamization.
Remarks of Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., President of Notre

Dame University--
Statement by member of DRV delegation and DRV press spokesman

Nguyen Thanh Le to Congressman Seymour Halpern --
Transcript of Conversation between Congressman Seymour Halpern and

Nguyen Thanh Le, DRV delegation.
Statement by PRG deputy spokesman Nguyen Van Tien to Congressman

Seymour Halpern -
Transcript of conversation between Congressman Seymour Halpern and

Mr. Nguyen Van Tien, PRG delegation..
Transcripts of conversations with representatives of the North Vietnamese

and Vietcong submitted by Congressman Leggett, and press release
Text of H.R. 317, expressing the sense of the Congress with respect to the
proposed "proportional repatriation” plan for obtaining the release of

American prisoners held in Southeast Asia -
Article by Representative Robert L. Leggett entitled "How To Bring

Them All Home".
Letter addressed to Congressman Leggett from Mrs. Barbara R. Mullen,

wife of a prisoner of war in Laos.-
Information supplied by Congressman Bingham concerning French re-

solution on withdrawal from Algeria-

79

82

83

92

105

106

110

156

LEGISLATION ON THE INDOCHINA WAR

TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 1971

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS,
SUBCOMMITTEE ON ASIAN AND PACIFIC AFFAIRS,

Washington, D.O. The subcommittee met at 2:15 p.m., in room 2172, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Cornelius È. Gallagher (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.

Mr. GALLAGHER. The subcommittee will come to order.

I want to welcome you here this afternoon as the Asian and Pacific Affairs Subcommittee opens the first comprehensive House hearings into bills and resolutions relating to ending the war in Indochina.

Today, we are hearing arguments of national security advanced over the publication of documents relating to the beginning and escalation of our involvement in the region. As important as national security may be, perhaps even more important to America is that the problems of Indochina are threatening our national sanity. Mietrust of our leaders past and present and disgust over the results of our policies are ripping apart the fragile fabric of our society and poisoning much of our national life.

As but one brief example which distresses me immensely this afternoon, the war in Indochina has so clouded our view of Asian affairs that we seem virtually immobilized in the face of the unprececlented human tragedy of East Pakistan.

The purpose of our hearing is not to perform a divisive exercise in name calling or guilt-ascribing over our past Indochina actions. I know of no people, inside or outside of the Congress, who want this par to continue. Who among us wants the killing of either Americans or Asians to continue? We are united in our desire to see our prisoners of war released from their cruel confinement.

So there are areas of agreement and positions around which men of good will can unite.

The question before us is not whether the war should end. The questions we are considering are when the war will end and how best to bring it about. What will the United States leave behind in Indochina as we conclude our combat role?

In light of the recent confirmation of our involvement in the overthrow of the Diem regime which disturbed the existing natural political balance, we created an inescapable moral commitment to the gov. ernments in Saigon which have followed. I opposed that decision at the time and we must now ask ourselves hard questions about America's legitimate interest in governments or the personalities in power in Saigon. I believe we must consider whether our current or postcombat policy in Vietnam and in all of Indochina should concern itself with

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »