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manage water resources through water prevention, water management, and supply forecasts. It also provides

reduction and erosion sedimentation. It hydrometeorological data for regulating also can help in developing recreational reservoir storage and managing

facilities and improving fish and wildlife streamflow. The Snow Supply Program is habitat. conducted in 11 Western States and Emergency Watershed Protection Alaska.

Program This program provides Plant Materials Program At 26 plant emergency assistance to safeguard lives materials centers across the country, and property in jeopardy due to sudden NRCS tests, selects, and ensures the watershed impairment by natural commercial availability of new and disasters. Emergency work includes improved conservation plants for erosion quickly establishing a protective plant reduction, wetland restoration, water cover on denuded land and stream quality improvement, streambank and banks; opening dangerously restricted riparian area protection, coastal dune channels; and repairing diversions and stabilization, biomass production, carbon levees. An emergency area need not be sequestration, and other needs. The Plant declared a national disaster area to be Materials Program is a cooperative effort eligible for help under this program. with conservation districts, other Federal Great Plains Conservation Program and State agencies, commercial

This program (GPCP) helps bring about businesses, and seed and nursery

long-term solutions to natural resource associations.

problems in the 10 Great Plains States. It River Basin Surveys and Investigations is aimed at total conservation treatment This program involves NRCS with of entire farms or ranches. Participation Federal, State, and local agencies in river in GPCP is voluntary and provides basin surveys and investigations, flood technical assistance and a long-term hazard analysis, and floodplain

cost-share contract between the management assistance. It addresses a participant and NRCS. The program has variety of natural resource concerns: been effective in addressing the needs of water quality, water conservation, socially disadvantaged farmers and wetlands protection, agricultural drought, ranchers and the needs of American rural development, municipal and Indian farmers and ranchers. In addition industrial water needs, and fish and to providing significant erosion and wildlife habitat.

sediment reduction benefits, it addresses Public Law 83–566 Small Watersheds problems related to water quality, Program The Small Watersheds

wildlife habitat protection, and other Program helps local sponsoring groups environmental concerns. to voluntarily plan and install watershed Resource Conservation and protection projects on private lands. Development Program This program These projects include flood prevention, (RC&D) is a locally driven program-an water quality improvement, soil erosion opportunity for civic-oriented groups to and sediment reduction, rural and

work together sharing knowledge and municipal water supply, irrigation water resources in solving common problems management, fish and wildlife habitat facing their region. The program offers enhancement, and wetlands restoration. aid in balancing the environmental, The Service helps local community economic, and social needs of an area. groups, government entities, and private A USDA coordinator helps each landowners working together using an designated RC&D council plan, develop, integrated, comprehensive watershed and carry out programs for resource approach to natural resource planning. conservation, water management, Public Law 78–534 Flood Prevention community development, and Program This program applies to 11 environmental enhancement. specific flood prevention projects

Rural Abandoned Mine Program This covering about 35 million acres in 11 program (RAMP) helps protect people States. It provides help in flood

and the environment from the adverse

effects of past coal-mining practices and promotes the development of soil and water resources on unreclaimed mine land. It provides technical and financial assistance to land users who voluntarily enter into 5-0-10-year contracts for the reclamation of eligible land and water. Wetlands Reserve Program Under this program, USDA purchases easements from agricultural land owners who voluntarily agree to restore and protect wetlands. Service employees help these owners develop plans to retire critical wetland habitat from crop production. The primary objectives are to preserve and restore wetlands, improve wildlife habitat, and protect migratory waterfowl. Water Bank Program The Service helps landowners protect, improve, or restore wetlands by identifying eligible lands, helping owners develop conservation plans, and implementing necessary land treatments. Through 10-year rental agreements between USDA and landowners, the Water Bank Program protects important nesting, breeding, and feeding areas for migratory waterfowl. Other benefits of the program include water conservation, erosion control, flood control, and landscape beautification. Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Program This voluntary incentive program supports the Nation's

commitment to water quality in the Colorado River, which provides water to more than 18 million people in parts of seven Western States and Mexico. NRCS provides financial and technical assistance to control salt loading in the Colorado River from both natural and human-caused sources. Among the remedies used are management practices to prevent irrigation-induced erosion. Forestry Incentives Program This program helps to increase the Nation's supply of products from nonindustrial private forest lands. This also ensures more effective use of existing forest lands and, over time, helps to prevent shortages and price increases for forest products. The program shares the cost incurred by landowners for tree planting and timberstand improvement. Farms-for-The-Future Program This program guarantees USDA loans and subsidizes interest on State loans to purchase agricultural land or development rights to preserve vital farmland resources for future generations. The money also can be reinvested by the States to generate earnings for future farmland protection efforts.

For further information, contact the Office of Public Affairs, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Department of Agriculture, P.O. Box 2890, Washington, DC 20013. Phone, 202-720–3210.

Graduate School, U.S. Department of Agriculture
Fourteenth Street and Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20250
Phone, 202-401-9129

PHILIP H. HUDSON LYNN EDWARDS NAT HOPKINS

Director
Deputy Director
Program Director, Center for Applied

Technology
Program Director, Correspondence Study
Director of Information and Public Affairs
Program Director, Evening and Saturday
Program Director, Government Audit Training

Institute
Program Director, International Institute for

Training and Education
Director of Administration
Director, National Independent Study Center

NORMA HARWOOD BRIAN GRAY RONALD MACNAB DONALD SMULAND

ROBERT BROWN

ROBERT KIES MIKE ALLEN

Director, Northeast Training Center Director, Southwest Training Center Director, Westerm Training Center Director, Southeast Training Center Director, National Capital Training Center Director, Midwest Training Center Director, Career Development Programs Registrar

FRANK BAUER
TONY GUTIERREZ
MAUREEN HETZEL
DAVID HITT
NANCY RANDA
CYNTHIA RUDMANN
LEW TAYLOR
CAROLYN NELSON

The Graduate School, U.S. Department of Agriculture, is a continuing education school offering career-related training to adults. It is self-supporting and does not receive direct appropriated funds from Congress or the Department of Agriculture. Fees charged individuals and Government agencies are nominal. Courses are planned with the assistance of Government professionals and specialists.

The faculty is mostly part-time and is drawn from throughout Government and the community at large. They are selected because of their professional and specialized knowledge and experience and thus bring a practicality and experience to their classrooms. Faculty holding regular Government positions take annual leave or leave without pay when teaching during their normal work hours.

The school does not grant degrees but does provide planned sequences of courses leading to certificates of accomplishment in a number of occupational and career fields important

to government. Training areas include management, auditing, computer science, communications, foreign language, procurement, financial management, and others.

The Graduate School's objective is to improve Government services by providing needed continuing education and training opportunities for Government employees and agencies.

The Graduate School, administered by a Director and governed by a General Administration Board appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture, was established by the Secretary of Agriculture on September 2, 1921, pursuant to act of May 15, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 2201); joint resolution of April 12, 1892 (27 Stat. 395); and the Deficiencies Appropriation Act of March 3, 1901 (20 U.S.C. 91).

In July 1995, through a memorandum of understanding between the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and the Department of Agriculture, the Graduate School acquired many of the training offices formerly operated by the Office of Personnel Management.

For further information, contact the Information Office, Graduate School, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Room 129, 600 Maryland Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20024. Phone, 202-401-9129.

Sources of Information

Consumer Activities Educational, organizational, and financial assistance is offered to consumers and their families in such fields as rural housing and farm operating programs, improved nutrition, family living and recreation, food stamp, school lunch, donated foods, and other food programs. Contact the Office of Public Affairs, Department of

Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250.
Phone, 202–720_2791.
Contracts and Small Business Activities
Contact the Office of Small and
Disadvantaged Business Utilization,
Department of Agriculture, Washington,
DC 20250. Phone, 202-720-7117.
Employment Most jobs in the
Department are in the competitive
service and are filled by applicants who

have established eligibility under an Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250. appropriate examination administered by Phone, 202-720-2791. the Office of Personnel Management or Films Motion pictures on a variety of Department Special Examining Units.

agricultural subjects are available for General employment inquiries may be

loan through various State Extension sent to the Recruitment and Employment

Service film libraries. Contact the Video Division, Office of Personnel,

and Teleconference Division, Office of Department of Agriculture, Washington,

Public Affairs, Department of
DC 20250. Phone, 202–720–5626.
Persons interested in employment in

Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250, for

a listing of cooperating film libraries. the Food and Nutrition Service should

Phone, 202-720-6072. contact the Regional Offices located in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas,

Color filmstrips and slide sets on a Denver, San Francisco, and Robbinsville, variety of subjects are available for NJ, or the national headquarters in purchase. For a listing of titles and Alexandria, VA. Phone, 703-305-2351

prices, contact the Photography Division, Persons interested in employment in Office of Public Affairs, Department of the Office of the Inspector General

Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250. should contact the USDA Office of

Phone, 202-720-6633. Personnel, Room 31-W, Administration

Whistleblower Hotline Persons wishing Building, Washington, DC 20250. Phone, 202-720-5781.

to register complaints of alleged In addition, all Forest Service field

improprieties concerning the Department offices (addresses indicated in the

should contact one of the Regional preceding text) accept employment

Offices or the Inspector General's applications.

Whistleblower hotline. Phone, 800—424Environment Educational,

9121 (toll-free, outside Washington, DC); organizational, technical, and financial

202-690–1622 (within the Washington, assistance is offered to local citizens,

DC, metropolitan area); or 202-690– organizations, and communities in such 1202 (TDD). fields as watershed protection, flood Reading Rooms Located at each USDA prevention, soil and water conservation agency at addresses indicated in the practices to reduce erosion and

preceding text. sedimentation, community water and Speakers Contact the nearest waste disposal systems, safe use of Department of Agriculture office or pesticides, and the development of county Extension agent. In the District of pesticide alternatives.

Columbia, contact the Office of Public Contact the nearest county extension Liaison, Office of Public Affairs, agent or USDA office, or write to the Department of Agriculture, Washington, Office of Public Affairs, Department of DC 20250. Phone, 202–720-2798.

For further information concerning the Department of Agriculture, contact the Office of Public Affairs, Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250. Phone, 202–720-2791.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Fourteenth Street between Constitution and Pennsylvania Avenues NW.,
Washington, DC 20230
Phone, 202-482-2000

MICHAEL KANTOR
PETER L. SCHER
WILLIAM J. TAYLOR III
DAVID LANE

DEBORAH FRANKENBERG
CLAUDIA RAYFORD-WILLIAMS
BETTIE BACA
(VACANCY)
(VACANCY)
KENT HUGHES
MICHAEL A. KEANE, Acting

SUSAN G. ESSERMAN, Acting
KATHLEEN A. AMBROSE
(VACANCY)
BARBARA S. FREDERICKS
MICHAEL A. LEVITT

ALDEN F. ABBOTT

JAMES K. WHITE

SECRETARY OF COMMERCE

Chief of Staff
Counsellor to the Secretary
Assistant to the Secretary and Director,

Office of Policy and Strategic Planning
Executive Assistant to the Secretary
Director, Office of White House Liaison

Executive Secretary
Deputy Secretary of Commerce

Assistant Deputy Secretary
Associate Deputy Secretary
Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged

Business Utilization
General Counsel

Deputy General Counsel
Counselor to the General Counsel
Assistant General Counsel for Administration
Assistant General Counsel for Legislation

and Regulation
Assistant General Counsel for Finance and

Litigation
Chief Counsel for Economics and Statistics

Administration
Chief Counsel for Export Administration
Chief Counsel for Import Administration
Chief Counsel for International Commerce
Chief Counsel for Minority Business

Development
Chief Counsel for Technology Administration
Assistant Secretary for Legislative and

Intergovernmental Affairs
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Legislative

and Intergovernmental Affairs Deputy Assistant Secretary for

Intergovernmental Affairs
Inspector General

Deputy Inspector General
Counsel to the Inspector General
Assistant Inspector General for Auditing
Assistant Inspector General for Investigations
Assistant Inspector General for Systems

Evaluation
Assistant Inspector General for Inspections

and Program Evaluations

HOYT H. ZIA
STEPHEN J. POWELL
ELEANOR ROBERTS LEWIS
PERCY ROBINSON, Acting

MARK BOHANNON
JANE BOBBITT

ELLEN BLOOM

MICHAEL FRAZIER

FRANK DEGEORGE
MICHAEL ZIMMERMAN
ELIZABETH T. BARLOW
JOHN D. NEWELL
DAMON L. BARBAT
JUDITH J. GORDON

JOHNNIE E. FRAZIER

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