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and many of the Commission's
recommendations have been enacted,
either by statute, Executive order, or
regulation. The Commission evaluates
Federal laws and the effectiveness of
Government equal opportunity
programs. It also serves as a national
clearinghouse for civil rights information.
Regional Programs The Commission
maintains six regional divisions.
Regional Divisions

Commission on Civil
Rights

Sources of Information
Complaints Complaints alleging denials
of civil rights may be reported to
Complaints Referral, 624 Ninth Street
NW., Washington, DC 20425. Phone,
202–376-8513; 800–552–6843 (toll-
free).
Employment Personnel Office, Room
510, 624 Ninth Street NW., Washington,
DC 20425. Phone, 202–376–8364.
Publications Commission publications
are made available upon request from
the Administrative Services and
Clearinghouse Division, Room 550, 624
Ninth Street NW., Washington, DC
20425. Phone, 202–376–8105. A catalog
of publications may be obtained from
this office.
Reading Room The National Civil
Rights Clearinghouse Library is located
in Room 602, 624 Ninth Street NW.,
Washington, DC 20425. Phone, 202-
376–8110.

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For further information, contact the Public Affairs Unit, United States Commission on Civil Rights, Room 730, 624 Ninth Street NW., Washington, DC 20425. Phone, 202–376-8312; hearing-impaired (TTY), 202376-8116.

UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY
301 Fourth Street SW., Washington, DC 20547
Phone, 202-619-4700

JOSEPH D. DUFFEY
IRIS J. BURNETT
PENN KEMBLE
DONNA M. OGLESBY
LOUISE TAYLOR
LEWIS MANILOW

WILLIAM HYBL

Director

Chief of Staff
Deputy Director
Counselor
Executive Secretary
Chairman, U.S. Advisory Commission on

Public Diplomacy
Vice Chairman, U.S. Advisory Commission on

Public Diplomacy
Director, Office of Civil Rights
Inspector General
General Counsel
Director, Office of Congressional and

Intergovernmental Affairs
Director, Office of Public Liaison
Director, Office of Research

Deputy Director
Associate Director for Broadcasting

Deputy Associate Director

HATTIE P. BALDWIN
MARIAN C. BENNETT
LES JIN
DOUGLAS WILSON

KIMBERLY MARTEAU
ANN T. PINCUS
STEPHEN M. SHAFFER
GEOFFREY COWAN, Acting
(VACANCY)

GEOFFREY COWAN JOYCE KRAVITZ RICHARD W. MCBRIDE

(VACANCY) MYRNA WHITWORTH

EVA JANE FRITZMAN

Director, Voice of America
Senior Adviser
Director, Office of External Affairs and

Development
Director, Office of Budget and Planning
Director, Office of Affiliate Relations and

International Media Training
Director, Office of Personnel and

Administration
Director, Office of Policy
Director, Office of Program Review
Director, Office of Engineering and

Technical Operations
Director, Office of WORLDNET Television

and Film Service Director, Office of Cuba Broadcasting

Director, Radio Marti

Director, TV Marti
President, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty,

Inc. (RFE/RL)
Broadcasting Board of Governors:
Chairman
Members

STEVE MUNSON FRANK CUMMINS ROBERT E. KAMOSA

CHARLES W. Fox III

ROLANDO BONACHEA, Acting
ROLANDO BONACHEA
ANTONIO DIEGUEZ
KEVIN KLOSE

DAVID W. BURKE
JOSEPH D. DUFFEY, CHERYL

HALPERN, EDWARD E. KAUFMAN,
TOM C. KOROLOGOS, BETTE BAO
LORD, ALBERTO ). MORA, MARC

B. NATHANSON, CARL SPIELVOGEL
KATHLEEN HARRINGTON
BRIAN T. CONNIFF
JOHN A. LINDBURG
JON BEARD
BARBARA FLOYD
ROBERT BARRY FULTON
MYRON L. HOFFMANN
PAMELA H. SMITH
JUDITH S. SIEGEL
JACOB P. GILLESPIE
C. ANTHONY JACKSON
(VACANCY)
JOHN P. LOIELLO

Chief of Staff
Director of Evaluation and Analysis
Legal Counsel
Congressional Liaison Officer

Confidential Assistant
Associate Director for Information

Deputy Associate Director
Director, Geographic Liaison
Director, Thematic Programs
Director, Foreign Press Centers
Director, Support Services

Executive Officer
Associate Director for Educational and Cultural

Affairs
Deputy Associate Director
Executive Director, Cultural Property Staff
Staff Director, J. William Fulbright Foreign

Scholarship Board
Director, Office of Citizen Exchanges
Director, Office of International Visitors
Director, Office of Academic Programs
Director, Office of Arts America
Director, Office of Policy and Evaluation

Executive Officer
Associate Director for Management

Deputy Associate Director
Director, Office of Administration
Director, Office of Technology

DELL PENDERGRAST
MARIE PAPAGEORGE KOUROUPAS
RALPH H. VOGEL

ROBERT SCHIFFER
LULA RODRIGUEZ
EDWARD MCBRIDE
COROLINE CROFT
DAVID MICHAEL WILSON
J. DAVID WHITTEN
HENRY HOWARD
JOANN CLIFTON
EILEEN KEANE BINNS
DANIEL S. CAMPBELL

Director, Office of Human Resources

JAN BRAMBILLA Comptroller, Office of the Comptroller

STANLEY M. SILVERMAN Director, Office of Security

LARRY CARNAHAN, Acting Director, Office of Contracts

EDWARD G. MULLER, Acting Executive Officer

DANIEL D. DUNNING Director, Office of African Affairs

THOMAS HULL Deputy Director

CORNELIUS WALSH Director, Office of American Republics Affairs STEPHEN CHAPLIN Deputy Director

JOHN DWYER
Director, Office of East Asian and Pacific

FRANK SCOTTON
Affairs
Deputy Director

NICHOLAS MELE
Director, Office of West European and

JOHN P. HARROD
Canadian Affairs
Deputy Director

C. MILLER CROUCH
Director, Office of East European and NIS ANNE M. SIGMUND

Affairs
Deputy Director

MORRIS E. JACOBS
Director, Office of North African, Near Eastern KENTON KEITH

and South Asian Affairs Deputy Director

JONATHAN OWEN (For the United States Information Agency statement of organization, see the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 22, Part 504)

The mission of the United States Information Agency is to understand, inform, and influence foreign communities in promotion of the national interest; and to broaden the dialog between Americans, their institutions, and counterparts abroad. In support of that mission, the Agency conducts academic and cultural exchanges, international broadcasting, and a wide variety of informational programs. The Agency is known as the U.S. Information Service overseas.

participation in international fairs and expositions abroad.

The five executive level offices of the Agency are the Office of Public Liaison, Office of the General Counsel, Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs, Office of the Inspector General, and the Office of Research.

Activities

The legislative mandates of the United States Information Agency (USIA) derive from the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1431) and the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2451). The U.S. Information and Educational Exchange Act's purpose is to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. It prohibits, with certain exceptions approved by Congress, dissemination within the United States of materials produced by the Agency for distribution overseas. It also requires the Agency to make its overseas program materials available for public inspection at its Washington, DC, headquarters. The Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act authorizes educational and cultural exchanges between the United States and other countries, as well as United States

The activities of the U.S. Information Agency are based on two key premises. The first is that foreign public opinion is important and that USIA should work to understand it, with the hope that our understanding will be a factor in policy formation; to inform others about American life and values, policies, and interests as a nation; and, if possible, to eliminate misperception and move others to action in ways that serve the national interest. The second premise is that mutual understanding born of

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people-to-people communication

Broadcasting, WORLDNET Television matters, and that USIA should serve as a and Film Service, and Radio Free facilitator to bring Americans and their Europe/Radio Liberty. academic and other nongovernmental

The Voice of America (VOA) is the sector institutions into substantive

International Broadcasting Bureau's contact with influential counterparts

functional element for worldwide radio abroad through exchanges and other broadcasting. VOA operates in programs.

accordance with the act of January 27, On this basis, USIA works to:

1948, as amended (22 U.S.C. 1463), -explain and advocate U.S. Policies which requires that it serve as a in terms that are credible and

consistently reliable, authoritative, meaningful in foreign cultures;

accurate, objective, and comprehensive -provide information about the news source. It must present a balanced United States, its people, values, and and comprehensive projection of institutions;

significant American thought and -build lasting relationships and institutions. VOA produces and understanding between Americans and broadcasts radio programs in English and U.S. institutions and their counterparts

46 foreign languages for overseas overseas through the exchange of people

audiences, and to over 2000 affiliate and ideas; and

stations worldwide. Its programming -advise on foreign attitudes and their

includes world and regional news, implications for U.S. policies.

reports from correspondents on the To accomplish its purposes, the

scene, analyses of worldwide events, Agency conducts a variety of activities feature programs, music, and editorials. overseas, including educational and

The Office of Cuba Broadcasting is academic exchanges, international radio

located within the Voice of America. It and television broadcasting, English

oversees all programming broadcast for teaching, the distribution of transcripts

Cuba on VOA's Radio Marti and TV and official texts of significant U.S.

Marti programs. In keeping with the Government policy statements,

principles of the VOA charter, both maintaining information resource centers

services offer their audiences accurate overseas with online reference

and objective news reports and features capabilities, assisting the mass media in

on American culture and opinion. Radio bringing information about U.S. foreign

Marti broadcasts on medium and policy to audiences around the world,

shortwave frequencies. TV Marti is and facilitating linkages between

available on VHF (very high frequency) American and foreign nongovernmental

and international satellite. institutions.

The WORLDNET Television and Film

Service is responsible for organizing and Functional Elements

directing the International Broadcasting

Bureau's worldwide television and film The four major functional elements of activities. The areas of responsibility the Agency are the International

encompass: producing programs and Broadcasting Bureau, the Bureau of

interactive press conferences for the Educational and Cultural Affairs, the WORLDNET satellite delivery system; Bureau of Information, and the Bureau of newsfiles in English, Spanish, French, Management.

Arabic, Ukrainian, and Russian; International Broadcasting Bureau The producing and acquiring films and International Broadcasting Bureau (IBB) videotapes for direct projection or was established by the United States placement overseas; providing facilitative International Broadcasting Act of 1994. assistance to visiting foreign television While a part of USIA, IBB receives and film producers; operating television decisionmaking and operational

news bureaus at foreign press centers; guidance from the Broadcasting Board of providing assistance to foreign Governors. The Bureau consists of the broadcasters in the production and Voice of America, the Office of Cuba telecast of cooperative television

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