The Works of Nathaniel Lardner, D.D. with a Life by Dr. Kippis ...

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Contents

Vegetius 396
61
Eunapius
62
Claudian 394
77
Macrobius 400
83
Rutilius 418
88
Olympiodorus 425
90
Zosimus
93
Hierocles of Alexandria 450
127
Proclus 464
130
XI Marinus 485
132
Damascius 540
138
Simplicius 550
148
A review of the Jewish and heathen testimonies in the several volumes of this work
154
THE STATE OF GENTILISM UNDER CHRISTIAN EMPERORS SECT PAGE 1 Imperial laws concerning gentile people and their worship
163
Valens about the year 373
182
The Petition of the Roman senate to Valentinian the younger in the year 384 that the Altar of Victory which had been re moved by Gratian might be ...
199
An image of Hercules destroyed by the christians at Suffecta
244
Rome besieged taken and sacked by Alaric the Goth in
250
The Correspondence between the people of Madaura and Augus
266
Observations of Orosius and Augustine upon the treatment given
273
Concluding observations upon the state gentilism under chris
286
HISTORY OF HERETICS
293
SECT PAGE
307
They respected the apostles and apostolic traditions
331
The seeds of these Heresies were sown in the days of the apostles
344
The account of him as given by Irenĉus and other ancient authors
350
SECT PAGE 5 He believed the world was made by angels the chief of whom presided over the Jews
355
His opinions concerning the person of Christ
356
Of the story of Simon the Cyrenian and whether he believed that Christ suffered
357
Beausobres view of the sentiments of Basilides concerning Christ
360
He believed the baptism of Jesus
361
He is said to have partaken of the things offered to idols and to have denied the necessity or reasonableness of suffering mar tyrdom
362
He believed that the soul only would be saved
363
A probable account of the foundation of this charge
366
He is also accused of using magic and incantations
367
Of the meaning of Caulacau and his definition of faith and hope
369
Of the name Abraxas which he is said to have given to the prince of the heavens
370
Of the number costliness and heathenish origin of those gems called Abraxĉi
371
Of the derivation and meaning of the word Abraxas and to what the Basilideans applied it
372
It probably referred to their philosophical Arcana
374
The gems called Abraxĉi were used by the heathens as charms
375
The christians accused by Adrian of worshipping Serapis
376
An examination of Montfaucons figures
377
These gems were undoubtedly of heathenish origin
382
From hence came the superstitious custom of writing Abrasadabra as a charm
383
Farther observations on Chifflet
385
Of the names of angels found on those gems
386
Of the scriptures received by Basilides
387
He did not pay great regard to the Old Testament ib 2 He received the whole or at least the greater part of the New
388
Of the gospel of Basilides
389
Of the prophets Barcabbas and Barcoph
390
And are said to have used magical arts
396
What scriptures they received
403
Observations tending to illustrate his history
409
CHAP V
417
of the time and general character of Prodicus and his followers
423
He is accused of being a magician
429
SECT PAGE
431
They received the scriptures both of the Old and New Testament
437
CHAP IX
444
CHAP X
448
Of the time in which he lived
450
The history of him as given by Epiphanius
452
The story of his deceiving a young woman doubtful
453
Several observations tending to show its incredibility
454
Some reason to suspect it was the invention of Epiphanius
456
he was expelled by his father
457
He had a great number of followers
458
Of his opinions and the number of principles which he held
459
His notion of the creator and the world formed by him and the God superior to him
461
The Marcionite idea of the difference between good and just
463
The good God was the maker of beings spiritual and invisible ib 14 The Marcionites erroneous in dividing the Deity
465
They were believers in a future judgment and in the necessity of
466
They thought the soul but not the bodies of the virtuous would
467
The belief of a transmigration ascribed to them by Epiphanius
469
Some account of their notion that Christ delivered the wicked but left the good
470
Marcions opinion of the person of Christ that he was a real man
471
SECT PAGE 29 They celebrated Baptism and the Eucharist but were somewhat irregular in the administration
483
Marcion wholly rejected the Old Testament
484
He also objected to the appointment of sacrifices
485
He mutilated the New Testament wherever it contained quotations from the Old
486
He framed antitheses to show the opposition of the law to the gospel
487
Marcion received but eleven books of the New Testament and of the gospels only that of St Luke and this mutilated
489
He rejected the genealogy and baptism of our Saviour
490
He also rejected the history of the temptation
491
An account of many other alterations made by him in St Lukes gospel
492
There is a sufficient number of texts remaining to confute his errors
498
The catholic christians asserted the antiquity of the unmutilated gospel
499
Marcion rejected the Acts of the Apostles
500
And received only ten epistles of St Paul and most of these altered
502
Of the alterations and omissions of Marcion in the epistle to the Galatians
503
la the first epistle to the Corinthians
505
In the second epistle to the Corinthians
506
In the epistle to the Romans
507
In the first epistle to the Thessalonians
508
In the epistle to the Ephesians called by him the epistle to the Laodiceans
509
He probably did not much alter the epistle to the Colossians
512
Nor at all that to Philemon
513
OF LUCIAN OR LEUCIUS 1 Some general account of him from ancient authors with observa tions thereun
514
SECT PAGE 2 Of the time when he lived
517
Of his opinions
518
Some observations on his notion about the souls of brutes and the resurrection of them
519
A belief in another kind of resurrection ascribed to him by Ter tullian
520
Some general account of his writings
521
Some observations on the assertion of Mr Jones that Leucius was a Manichee
523
Leucius was the author of the History of the Nativity of the Vir gin Mary
524
The writer of it not a Jew
525
The Protevangelion or Gospel of James was composed by Leucius
526
A current tradition that Joseph was a widower and had children by a former wife
527
Passages in Epiphanius referring to the Gospel of the Nativity and the Protevangelion
528
Observations on some of the contents of these two Gospels
529
Leucius is thought to have interpolated the Gospel of the infancy
530
He was the forger of the Gospel of Nicodemus
531
Two other Gospels ascribed to Leucius
532
Of the traditions of Matthias It is rather uncertain what they were
534
Leucius was the author of the forged Acts or Journeying of the apostles
535
Some account of the contents of this book
537
These forgeries prove the truth of the canonical scriptures
538
Of his connection with Philumene
539
No foundation for the story of his incontinence
540
Unjustly accused of discouraging inquiry
541
Of his writings
543
SECT PAGE
544
His sentiments about the New Testament probably not very dif
550
By Christ who descended upon Jesus they probably meant
557
OF THE CAIANS OR CAINITES
560
Very different representations given of these people by Epiphanius
566
Of the time when he lived
572
SECT PAGE 3 He is accused of denying Christ in a time of persecution
574
Two observations on what Epiphanius says about him
575
There were several of the same name in the second century
577
Theodotus the banker is generally supposed to be the author of the sect of the Melchisedechians
578
CHAP XVIII
579
What authors say of him and by whom he is omitted
580
Some account of him and those who wrote against him
581
Some account of his opinions concerning the eternity of matter
582
He believed one supreme God unchangeably good
583
He ascribed to matter an irregular motion but introduced no ĉons
584
No distinct account of his opinion concerning the person of Jesus Christ
585
He never set up a separate communion
586
He received both the Old and New Testament
587
No account of any writings of his
588
CHAP XIX
589
From whence they derived their name and of the extent and con tinuance of their opinions
590
Where Montanus was born and of certain reproaches cast on him and his followers
591
Of his companions and assistants and of their prophecies
592
of his pretensions and manner of prophesying
593
SECT PAGE
595
Of their testimony to the scriptures
601
He would not allow that the Father suffered
607
Of his opinions country and philosophical speculations
613
Of the name of the founder of this sect and of several authors
621
CHAP XXIII
627

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Page 289 - And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength. This is the first commandment. And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these.
Page 290 - For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world ; looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ ; who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.
Page 290 - A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another ; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another. By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another.
Page 290 - Well, Master, Thou hast said the truth: for there is one God ; and there is none other but He : and to love Him with all the heart, and with all the understanding, and with all the soul, and with all the strength, and to love his neighbour as himself, is more than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices. And when Jesus saw that he answered discreetly, He said unto him, Thou art not far from the kingdom of God.
Page 290 - Christ ; who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify to himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works,
Page 289 - And we have seen and do testify, that the Father sent the Son to be the Saviour of the world.
Page 289 - The first of all the commandments is, Hear, O Israel; The Lord our God is one Lord : and thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment.
Page 505 - Even so we, when we were children, were in bondage under the elements of the world : but when the fulness of time was come, God sent forth His Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.
Page 564 - Which have forsaken the right way, and are gone astray, following the way of Balaam the son of Bosor, who loved the wages of unrighteousness; But was rebuked for his iniquity: the dumb ass speaking with man's voice forbad the madness of the prophet.
Page 564 - Woe unto them ! for they have gone in the way of Cain, and ran greedily after the error of Balaam for reward, and perished in the gainsaying of Core.

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