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Page 180 - If I were a woman, I would kiss as many of you as had beards that pleased me, complexions that liked me, and breaths that I defied not...
Page 5 - Half-hidden, like a mermaid in sea-weed, Pensive awhile, she dreams awake, and sees, In fancy, fair St. Agnes in her bed, But dares not look behind, or all the charm is fled.
Page 389 - ... point to die : even from my youth up thy terrors have I suffered with a troubled mind. 16 Thy wrathful displeasure goeth over me : and the fear of thee hath undone me.
Page 409 - We sacrifice to dress, till household joys And comforts cease. Dress drains our cellar dry, And keeps our larder lean; puts out our fires; And introduces hunger, frost, and woe, Where peace and hospitality might reign.
Page 18 - Speak unto the children of Israel, and bid them that they make them fringes in the borders of their garments throughout their generations, and that they put upon the fringe of the borders a ribband of blue : and it shall be unto you for a fringe, that ye may look upon it, and remember all the commandments of the Lord, and do them...
Page 22 - The Lord said, I will bring again from Bashan, I will bring my people again from the depths of the sea...
Page 33 - I have not seen a dapper Jack so brisk : He wears a short Italian hooded cloak, Larded with pearl, and in his Tuscan cap A jewel of more value than the crown.
Page 103 - That day she was dressed in white silk, bordered with pearls of the size of beans, and over it a mantle of black silk, shot with silver threads ; her train was very long, the end of it borne by a Marchioness ; instead of a chain, she had an oblong collar of gold and jewels.
Page 398 - Lady Mary Wortley is arrived; I have seen her; I think her avarice, her dirt, and her vivacity, are all increased. Her dress, like her languages, is a galimatias of several countries; the ground-work rags, and the embroidery nastiness. She needs no cap, no handkerchief, no gown, no petticoat, no shoes. An old black-laced hood represents the first, the fur of a horseman's coat, which replaces the third, serves for the second ; a dimity petticoat is deputy, and officiates for the fourth, and slippers...
Page 17 - And all the women that were wise-hearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, both of blue, and of purple, and of scarlet, and of fine linen. And all the women whose heart stirred them up in wisdom spun goats

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