The Hop-garden: A Didactic Poem

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H. P. Silvester, 1799 - 118 pages

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Page 110 - Cold on Canadian hills, or Minden's plain, Perhaps that parent wept her soldier slain — Bent o'er her babe, her eye dissolved in dew, The big drops, mingling with the milk he drew, Gave the sad presage of his future years, The child of misery baptized in tears.
Page 117 - I rose before daybreak: when I came into the enclosures, I found the stubbles and clover-grounds matted all over with a thick coat of cobweb, in the meshes of which a copious and heavy dew hung so plentifully that the whole face of the country seemed, as it were, covered with two or three setting-nets drawn one over another. When the dogs attempted to hunt, their eyes were so blinded and hoodwinked that they could not proceed, but were obliged...
Page 78 - The jointed herbage fhoots ; th' unfallow'd glebe Yearly o'ercomes the granaries with ftore Of golden wheat, the ftrength of human life, Lo, on auxiliary poles, the Hops Afcending fpiral, rang'd in meet array ! Lo, how the arable with barley-grain Stands thick, o'erfhadow'd, to the thirfty hind Tranfporting profpeft ! thefe, as modern ufe Ordains, infus'd, an auburn drink compofe, Wholefome, of deathlefs fame.
Page 66 - See, see, unsummon'd, blithesome now advance The willing Pickers to the Garden's bound ; Where, plac'd to meet the moisture-drinking ray, They plant the Crib capacious. Soon commence Their various tasks. All emulous to please...
Page 117 - ... copious and heavy dew hung so plentifully, that the whole face of the country seemed, as it were, covered with two or three setting nets, drawn one over another. When the dogs attempted to hunt, their eyes were so blinded and hoodwinked that they could not proceed, but were obliged to lie down and scrape the incumbrances from their faces with their forefeet.
Page 110 - Who, then, no more by golden prospects led, Of the poor Indian begg'da leafy bed. Cold on Canadian hills, or Minden's plain, Perhaps that parent mourn'd her soldier slain : Bent o'er her babe, her eye...
Page 116 - It is probable that fome benefit might be produced by planting a fmall number of male Hops in each Garden (for the Hop is of that order of vegetables which bear the male and female flowers on different plants.) The advantage of this practice is experimentally proved with regard to the...
Page 97 - To minifter; but, to th' exterior-croud Of fleek church-wardens and church-tending dames. Incomprehennbly refin'd and deep ; Expofing fchifms and herefies long time Refuted — yet frefh broach'd, — unwary flocks To fever from their fhepherd ; flocks, too fond Of novel food, — not heeding whence deriv'd ; Whether from Salem's Mount, with deathlefs flow'rs And ever-fpringing pafturage adorn'd; Or whether from the rank and treach'rous fens 280 Whence many an ignis fatuus moots up To lead unftable...
Page 99 - Fafhion difplays, inconftant as the moon. Them to allure, in vain does chymic art For human veftments multiply its dyes. One mode of drefs contents them; and but few 310 The colours of their choice, — the gaudy fhunn'd, . E'en by the gentle fifterhood.
Page 99 - E'en by the gentle fifterhood. In youth, The rofes vivid hue their cheeks, alone, Wear, dimpling, — fhaded by a bonnet plain, White as the cygnet's bofom,— jetty black As raven's wing, — or, if a tint it bear, 'Tis what the...

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