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all Christian nations to remember, that at least one hundred and fifty millions of immortal beings were waiting, -as far as death will permit them to wait,--to receive the gospel at their hands.

The conquests of the British army, said he, once filled me with rage. I invoked all the evil genii of pagan superstition to aid in expelling them. Now I look with admiration at the

purposes of Jehovah. I no longer wonder why this vast populous empire should acknowledge the supremacy of a foreign power. We have been conquered by a Christian country. I perceive the object. Christians of England, God has thrown us in a most signal manner on your benevolence for the knowledge of the truth. I would appeal to you by every thing that is affecting in the civil relations God has established between us, to second the designs of his providence and his grace. No longer uphold our “ abominable idolatries” -- no longer put to shame the few of us who are called by the same name with yourselves. Let govern. ment no longer adopt unchristian measures to increase its revenue. Let it no longer publicly sanction our execrable rites, to retain its popularity. Send more Christian rulers arnong us

men who shall exemplify the excellence of Christianity, and by their influence induce our chief men to adopt it. Send more soldiers of the cross. We need a mighty army.

Once you subdued us to your earthly sovereign. Make another attempt, and for another victory; and never give over, until the banner of the cross floats in every province, and Jesus Christ is universally acknowledged as our King and Saviour.

CHAPTER XXXV.

A WEALTHY Chinese, whose family resided in the interior of the empire, but who had been converted while trading at a missionary station, in a neighbouring country, made the next address.

I have heard, said he, the statements of my brethren respecting the victories achieved by the Son of God in their countries. My heart has rejoiced. And yet my sorrow has been stirred at the recollection of my own country. Those of us who have been rescued from the grasp of the Destroyer, are like a drop to the ocean. When I think of my own country - darkened with human beings, like swarms of devastating locusts—all lying in wickedness — all ignorant of the Saviour I involuntarily ask myself, can this be the divine will? Is the Conqueror of death and hell thus to be kept out of more than one-third of his dearlybought possessions? Can it be the design of God that the rulers of the darkness of this world should retain the undisturbed dominion of such a large portion of mankind? They will no doubt struggle for it. Driven from other places, they will retreat to China and Japan. Here will they concentrate

their forces. And here most probably earth shall witness their last, most desperate resistance. But their doom is fixed. The day of their defeat and expulsion is drawing nigh. My soul kindles at the prospect, and I almost forget how this change is to be accomplished. I forget for the moment how fearful and faithless is the host of the Lord, when the conquest of China is proposed.

But can nothing be done to expel these fears, and increase their faith? Let us look at the appalling difficulties, and see if they are as insurmountable as has been imagined. Wherever I go I encounter the opinion that no remarkable changes have taken place in China from a very remote period, and that consequently it appears preposterous to expect any such changes. But what system of logic is this? Because a dotard is wedded to his old habits, therefore he can never die! I tell them I can easily account for that stamp of perpetuity which is impressed upon all our institutions, and that none of the causes which produce it forbid the change they deem impossible.

Our government assumes for its basis the most popular of all judicatory principles - paternal interest and authority. It is more ramified and vigilant than probably any other government in

the world. It professes to have the sanction and test of antiquity, and it inculcates the absurd idea that a recurrence to ancient usages is the only return to wisdom. It deals liberally in fraud, and what it cannot accomplish by power, it attempts by artifice. It proclaims the false opinion that the best of other countries are in a state of demibarbarism, and it carefully excludes the influence which would correct this mistake.

These causes combine to produce those effects, which give to China, especially from the distance of western nations, an unchanging phase. To a nearer beholder many variations are discov. ered.

It is not generally known that within about six centuries, there have been four distinct dynasties on the throne of China, and that two of these have been of foreign origin. At present there is a formidable party opposed to the reigning Tartar family, and aiming at their subversion.

It has been the wise policy of the conquerors never to change the form of government; nor to touch the venerated ceremonies and customs of antiquity. Hence, before and after the greatest revolutions, things appear the same.

The barring of the gates of China, and the guarding of its coasts against foreigners, is a recent measure of government, and in actual defi

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