Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

United States Department of State

Washington, D.C. 20520

February 5, 2003

Dear Mr. Chairman:

Following the October 1, 2002 hearing at which Ambassador Francis X. Taylor testified, additional questions were submitted for the record. Please find enclosed the responses to those questions.

If we can be of further assistance to you, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Sincerely,

Paul V. Belly

Paul V. Kelly
Assistant Secretary
Legislative Affairs

Enclosure:

As stated.

The Honorable
Bob Graham,
Select Committee on Intelligence,

United States Senate.

Questions for the Rocord
Joint Congressional 9/11 Inquiry
Responses of the Department of State

October 31 Committee lattor, Question 1:

What operating system(s) and software packages does your agency use for internal classified e-mail correspondence? What is the average age and process speed of your workstations?

Answer:

Microsoft NT 4.0 and Windows 2000 are the operating systems used in the Department of State.

The Department uses Microsoft Outlook for all internal classified e-mail correspondence.

The average age of our classified computers is approximately two years and the average processing speed is 650 Mhz.

Under the Department's ongoing modernization program, desktop equipment will be upgraded every four years.

The operating system on Bureau of Intelligence and Research computers is Windows/NT 4.0. INR uses the MSOFFICE suite with Outlook as the e-mail carrier. The average processing speed of INR computers is a gigabyte.

Questions for the Racord
Joint Congressional 9/11 Inquiry
Responses of the Department of State

October 31 Committo. lottor, question 2:

Do individuals in your agency have the ability from their workstations to electronically send and receive e-mails and attachments to all 12 of your sister intelligence agencies (other than by STU-III Fax)? Please identify those agencies with which you can electronically communicate; please identify what special procedures or actions (if any) must be taken in order to communicate with each agency. For example, do special accounts need to be established, or special hardware or software installed?

Answer:

The Bureau of Intelligence and Research can send and receive e-mails with attachments from all members of the intelligence community over the JWICS network. No special hardware or software is required to exchange mail with these agencies.

Quostions for the Racord
Joint Congressional 9/11 Inquiry
Rasponsos of the Department of State

October 31 Committee lottor, question 3

Do individuals in your agency have the ability from their workstations (assuming appropriate need-to-know) to access electronically classified databases and websites at all 12 of your sister intelligence agencies? Please identify those agencies with which you do not have this ability. For those agencies with which this capability exists, please identify what special procedures or actions (if any) must be taken in order to access such intranets. For example, do special accounts need to be established, or special hardware or software installed?

Aaswer:

All Bureau of Intelligence and Research personnel have the ability to access websites and databases on Intelink from their desktops. There are websites and databases that require PKI certificates to access and INR has enabled all users identified by the sponsoring agencies with those certificates.

Questions for the Record
Joint Congressional 9/11 Inquiry
Responses of the Department of Stato

October 31 Committee lotter, Question 4:

What percentage of your workforce has desktop access to the open unclassified Internet?

Answer:

As of January 17, 2003, 32,045 users out of the planned 43,411 users or 74 percent are connected to our Sensitive But Unclassified Network known as Open Net Plus. This network allows users to access the Internet.

In the interim, there are users who do not have access to OpenNet Plus and have other means to access the Internet, such as stand-alone computers or via separate Internet-only local area networks. Our goal is to complete connections for the workforce by mid-2003.

More specifically, in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research, approximately 70 users have desktop access to this network.

Additionally, all INR analysts have access to the open unclassified Internet through the intelligence community's Open Source Information System (OSIS).

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »