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Questions for the Record

Joint Congressional 9/11 Inquiry
Responses of the Department of State

October 31 Committee letter, Question 2:

Do individuals in your agency have the ability from their workstations to electronically send and receive e-mails and attachments to all 12 of your sister intelligence agencies (other than by STU-III Fax)? Please identify those agencies with which you can electronically communicate; please identify what special procedures or actions (if any) must be taken in order to communicate with each agency. For example, do special accounts need to be established, or special hardware or software installed?

Answer:

The Bureau of Intelligence and Research can send and receive e-mails with attachments from all members of the intelligence community over the JWICS network. No special hardware or software is required to exchange mail with these agencies.

Questions for the Record

Joint Congressional 9/11 Inquiry
Responses of the Department of State

October 31 Committee letter, Question 3

Do individuals in your agency have the ability from their workstations (assuming appropriate need-to-know) to access electronically classified databases and websites at all 12 of your sister intelligence agencies? Please identify those agencies with which you do not have this ability. For those agencies with which this capability exists, please identify what special procedures or actions (if any) must be taken in order to access such intranets. For example, do special accounts need to be established, or special hardware or software installed?

Answer:

All Bureau of Intelligence and Research personnel have the ability to access websites and databases on Intelink from their desktops. There are websites and databases that require PKI certificates to access and INR has enabled all users identified by the sponsoring agencies with those

certificates.

Questions for the Record

Joint Congressional 9/11 Inquiry
Responses of the Department of State

October 31 Committee letter, Question 4:

What percentage of your workforce has desktop access to the open unclassified Internet?

Answer:

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As of January 17, 2003, 32,045 users out of the planned 43,411 users are connected to our Sensitive But Unclassified Network known as Open Net Plus. This network allows users to access the Internet.

In the interim, there are users who do not have access to OpenNet Plus and have other means to access the Internet, such as stand-alone computers or via separate Internet-only local area networks. Our goal is to complete connections for the workforce by mid-2003.

More specifically, in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research, approximately 70 users have desktop access to this network.

Additionally, all INR analysts have access to the open unclassified Internet through the intelligence community's Open Source Information System (OSIS).

Questions for the Record
Joint Congressional 9/11 Inquiry
Responses of the Department of State

October 31 Committee letter, Question #5:

Does your agency ever communicate classified information to state and local law enforcement organizations? If so, by what means is this information communicated and typically to whom?

Answer:

The Bureau of Intelligence and Research's TIPOFF program office (INR/TIPOFF) has no current capability or mission for data sharing with state and local law enforcement organizations. We are in discussions with the FBI on a Memorandum of Understanding to make TIPOFF's database of suspected foreign terrorists available to state and local law enforcement organizations through the FBI's National Criminal Information Center and its Violent Gang/Terrorist Organization File. This would give state and local law enforcement officials access to TIPOFF's Sensitive But Unclassified biographic information for the first time. TIPOFF currently responds, at the appropriate classification levels, to ad hoc requests (usually telephonic) from the FBI.

The Bureau of Intelligence and Research's Office of Analysis for Terrorism, Narcotics and Crime (INR/TNC) has never done so directly. Some of the threat warning products that we draft or clear on for the IICT (Interagency Intelligence Committee on Terrorism) may be downgraded at FBI and passed on to state and locals, but not at our initiative. The IICT is the IC's CT umbrella organization; it is housed at CIA/CTC and answers to the

Questions for the Record

Joint Congressional 9/11 Inquiry.
Responses of the Department of State

October 21 Committee letter, Question 6:

What are the key policy and technical impediments to implementing an effective information architecture that facilitates information sharing between agencies?

Answer:

The basic technical requirements for information sharing between agencies are:

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secure links between agency internal networks
(intranets);

shared and searchable staff directories that
include office responsibilities and contact
information (including email address); and
agreed security standards and some basic

agreement on the use of software and data applications
that can work seamlessly across agency boundaries as
necessary.

Interagency networks such as SIPRNET (Secret Internet Protocol Router Network) and OSIS (Open Source Information System) may be the technical means towards realizing these information sharing requirements.

Key policy questions include whether to build upon existing interagency networks, or seek to create new networks, or extend a single agency's network to others.

Information sharing will not mature rapidly without effective risk management countermeasures to enable

classified information exchanges among Federal agencies in

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