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The National Technical Institute for the strengths over the years has been its Deaf (NTID) was established by act of ability to adapt its educational programs June 8, 1965 (20 U.S.C. 681), and after to technological and social change, and several years of planning, programs NTID helps keep that tradition alive. It began in 1968. Funded primarily

has served more than 7,000 deaf through the Department of Education, it students since 1968. is an integral part of a larger institution Deaf graduates from RIT have found known as the Rochester Institute of employment throughout the Nation or Technology (RIT).

have moved on to advanced academic The presence of NTID at RIT is the

studies. Of those who pursued first effort to educate large numbers of

employment, more than 90 percent have deaf students within a college campus

been placed in jobs; 93 percent in jobs planned primarily for hearing students.

commensurate with their educational Unique in the world, NTID is a vital part preparation. Of those employed, 80 of RIT's main 1,300-acre campus in

percent work in business and industry, suburban Rochester, NY. It provides

more than 11 percent in government, educational opportunities for qualified

and the remainder in education. students from every State in the Nation

The Institutes accept applications from

U.S. residents, as well as a limited and, through educational outreach, publications, and related service, serves

number of international students. An

overall eighth grade achievement level deaf persons throughout the world. In

or above is required, and, except under addition, NTID conducts research to

special circumstances, an applicant must better understand the role of deafness in

have completed a secondary program. education and employment, and to

An applicant also must show evidence of develop innovative teaching techniques.

need for special services because of It develops training activities for its

hearing loss and have an unaided better faculty and staff, as well as for other

ear average of 70dB ISO. International professionals working with deaf persons

applicants generally are required to take across the country.

the Test of English as a Foreign Language One of the major reasons for NTID's (TOEFL) and must provide success in helping deaf students join the documentation of availability of financial mainstream of American life is its close resources to meet the full cost of working relationship with other RIT

attending RIT. References are requested. colleges in developing career-oriented Both Institutes are accredited by the programs of study. One of RIT's main Middle States Association of Colleges

and Secondary Schools. Rochester Institute of Technology also has been accredited by the Engineers' Council for Professional Development, National Association of Schools of Art, Committee on Professional Training of American Chemical Society, Council on Social Work Education, and the National

Accrediting Agency for Clinical
Laboratory Sciences.
For further information, contact the Rochester
Institute of Technology, National Technical Institute
for the Deaf, Department of Recruitment and
Admissions, Lyndon Baines Johnson Building, 52
Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5604.
Phone, 716

475-6700.

Sources of Information

Inquiries on the following information
may be directed to the specified office,
Department of Education, 600
Independence Avenue SW., Washington,
DC 20202.
Contracts and Small Business Activities
Call or write the Office of Small and
Disadvantaged Business Utilization.
Phone, 202–708–9820.

Employment Inquiries and applications for employment, and inquiries regarding the college recruitment program, should be directed to the Human Resources Group. Phone, 202-401-0553. Organization Contact the Management Systems Improvement Group. Phone, 202-260–8973. TDD, 202-260–8956.

For further information, contact the Information Center, Department of Education, Room 4608 (ROB3), 600 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20202. Phone, 800-USA-LEARN. Internet, http:// www.ed.gov/.

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585
Phone, 202-586-5000

HAZEL R. O'LEARY
CHARLES B. CURTIS
THOMAS P. GRUMBLY
KYLE SIMPSON

DONALD W. PEARMAN, JR.

ROBERT R. NORDHAUS
JOHN C. LAYTON
DIRK L. FORRISTER

MARC W. CHUPKA, Acting

TARA J. O'TOOLE

ARCHER L. DURHAM

PATRICIA F. GODLEY
VICTOR H. REIS
CHRISTINE A. ERVIN

SECRETARY OF ENERGY
Deputy Secretary
Under Secretary
Associate Deputy Secretary for Energy

Programs
Associate Deputy Secretary for Field

Management
General Counsel
Inspector General
Assistant Secretary, Congressional, Public, and

Intergovernmental Affairs
Assistant Secretary, Policy and International

Affairs
Assistant Secretary, Environment, Safety, and

Health
Assistant Secretary, Human Resources and

Administration
Assistant Secretary, Fossil Energy
Assistant Secretary, Defense Programs
Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency and

Renewable Energy
Assistant Secretary, Environmental

Management
Administrator, Energy Information

Administration
Director, Fissile Materials Disposition
Director, Worker and Community Transition
Director of Energy Research
Director of Civilian Radioactive Waste

Management
Director of Hearings and Appeals
Director of Nonproliferation and National

Security
Chief Financial Officer
Director of Nuclear Energy, Science, and

Technology
Director of Economic Impact and Diversity
Director of Quality Management
Executive Director of Secretary of Energy

Advisory Board
Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory

Commission

ALVIN L. ALM

JAY E. HAKES

GREGORY P. RUDY, Acting
ROBERT W. DEGRASSE, JR.
MARTHA A. KREBS
DANIEL A. DREYFUS

GEORGE B. BREZNAY
JOAN B. ROHLFING

DONALD W. PEARMAN, JR., Acting
TERRY R. LASH

CORLISS S. MOODY
NANCY K. WEIDENFELLER
DAVID W. CHENEY, Acting

ELIZABETH ANNE MOLER

The Department of Energy, in partnership with its customers, is entrusted to contribute to the welfare of the Nation by providing the technical information and

the scientific and educational foundation for the technology, policy, and institutional leadership necessary to achieve efficiency in energy use, diversity in energy sources, a more productive and competitive economy, improved environmental quality, and a secure national defense.

The Department of Energy (DOE) was established by the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7131), effective October 1, 1977, pursuant to Executive Order 1 2009 of September 13, 1977. The act consolidated the major Federal energy functions into one Cabinet-level Department.

Offices managing programs which require large budget outlays or provide technical direction and support are structured to reflect the principal programmatic missions of the Department: energy programs, national security programs, environmental management programs, and science and technology programs. The energy programs area includes the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, the Power Marketing Administrations, and the Energy Information Administration. The national security programs area includes the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs and the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The environmental management programs area includes the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition, and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The science and technology programs area includes the Office of Energy Research and the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology.

The Department's organization also includes the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which is an independent regulatory organization within the Department.

spokesperson for the Department; and ensures that effective communication and working relationships with State, local, and tribal governments, the President, the Congress, other Federal agencies and departments, the private sector, and the public are achieved. The Secretary is the principal adviser to the President on energy policies, plans, and programs. Deputy Secretary The Deputy Secretary acts for the Secretary in the Secretary's absence and assists the Secretary in deciding major energy policy and planning issues and in representing the Department before Congress and the public. The Deputy Secretary, assisted by the Under Secretary, provides daily management guidance and decisionmaking and coordinates the efforts of the energy, weapons/waste cleanup, and science and technology programs to achieve the Department's goals by delivering quality services to the public. The Deputy Secretary has primary oversight responsibility for the Department's energy, national security, and science and technology programs. Under Secretary The Under Secretary has primary responsibility for the Department's environmental management programs, as well as the Office of Worker and Community Transition.

Staff Offices

Office of the Secretary Secretary The Secretary provides the overall vision, programmatic leadership, management and direction, and administration of the Department; decides major energy policy and planning issues; acts as the principal

Field Management The Associate Deputy Secretary for Field Management provides centralized responsibility for strategic planning, management coordination, and oversight of the Department's field operations in general; and, specifically, for coordinating program and project planning, execution, and management assignments of the Department's eight multipurpose operations offices and two field offices

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