Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

conducts preliminary investigations under the Tariff Act of 1930 to determine whether there is reasonable indication of material injury to, threat of material injury to, or material retardation of the establishment of an industry in the United States by reason of imports of foreign merchandise allegedly being subsidized or sold at less than fair value (19 U.S.C. 1671, 1673, 1675). If the Commission's determination is affirmative, and the Secretary of Commerce further determines that the foreign merchandise is being subsidized or is being, or is likely to be, sold at less than its fair value, or there is reason to believe or suspect such unfair practices are occurring, then the Commission conducts final investigations to determine whether a U.S. industry is materially injured or threatened with material injury, or its establishment is materially retarded by reason of such imports.

if the Secretary of Commerce determines to suspend an investigation upon acceptance of an agreement to eliminate the injurious effect of subsidized imports or imports sold at less than fair value, the Commission may conduct an investigation to determine whether the injurious effect of imports of the merchandise that was the subject of the suspended investigation is eliminated completely by the agreement. The Commission also conducts investigations to determine whether in light of changed circumstances such a suspension agreement continues to eliminate completely the injurious effect of imports of the merchandise.

The Commission conducts investigations to determine whether changed circumstances exist that indicate that an industry in the United States would not be threatened with material injury, or the establishment of such an industry would not be materially retarded, if the countervailing duty order or antidumping order resulting from affirmative final determinations by the Commission and Secretary of Commerce were modified or revoked. Import Interference With Agricultural Programs The Commission conducts investigations at the direction of the

President to determine whether any articles are being or are practically certain to be imported into the United States under such conditions and in such quantities as to render or tend to render ineffective, or to materially interfere with, programs of the Department of Agriculture for agricultural commodities or products thereof, or to reduce substantially the amount of any product processed in the United States from such commodities or products, and makes findings and recommendations (7 U.S.C. 624). The President may restrict the imports in question by imposition of either import fees or quotas. Such fees or quotas may be applied only against countries that are not members of the World Trade Organization. Unfair Practices in Import Trade The Commission applies U.S. statutory and common law of unfair competition to the importation of products into the United States and their sale (19 U.S.C. 1337). The statute declares unlawful unfair methods of competition and unfair acts in the importation or sale of products in the United States, the threat or effect of which is to destroy or substantially injure a domestic industry, prevent the establishment of such an industry, or restrain or monopolize trade and commerce in the United States. The statute also declares as unlawful per se infringement of a valid and enforceable U.S. patent, copyright, registered trademark, or maskwork; no resulting injury need be found. If the Commission determines that there is a violation of the statute, it is to direct that the articles involved be excluded from entry into the United States, or it may issue cease-anddesist orders directing the person engaged in such violation to cease and desist from engaging in such unfair methods or acts.

Provision is made for the Commission to make certain public interest determinations that could result in the withholding of an exclusion or ceaseand-desist order. ITC remedial orders in section 337 cases are effective when issued and become final 60 days after issuance unless disapproved for policy reasons by the President within that 60

the thousands of products imported into the United States, methods of production, and the extent and relative importance of U.S. consumption, production, and trade, together with certain basic factors affecting the competitive position and economic health of domestic industries.

day period. Commission determinations of violation are subject to court review. Uniform Statistical Data The Commission, in cooperation with the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of Commerce, establishes for statistical purposes an enumeration of articles imported into the United States and exported from the United States, and seeks to establish comparability of such statistics with statistical programs for domestic production (19 U.S.C. 1484).

In conjunction with such activities, the three agencies are to develop concepts for an international commodity code for reporting transactions in international trade and to report thereon to the Congress (19 U.S.C. 1484). Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, Annotated The Commission issues a publication containing the U.S. tariff schedules and related matters and considers questions concerning the arrangement of such schedules and the classification of articles (19 U.S.C. note prec. 1202, 1484). International Trade Studies The Commission conducts studies, investigations, and research projects on a broad range of topics relating to international trade, pursuant to requests of the President, the House Ways and Means Committee, the Senate Finance Committee, either branch of the Congress, or on its own motion (19 U.S.C. 1332). Public reports of these studies, investigations, and research projects are issued in most cases.

The Commission also keeps informed of the operation and effect of provisions relating to duties or other import restrictions of the United States contained in various trade agreements (19 U.S.C. 2482). Occasionally the Commission is required by statute to perform specific trade-related studies. Industry and Trade Summaries The Commission prepares and publishes, from time to time, a series of summaries of trade and tariff information (19 U.S.C. 1332). These summaries contain descriptions (in terms of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States) of

Sources of Information Inquiries should be directed to the specific organizational unit or to the Secretary, United States International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436. Phone, 202205–2000. Contracts The Chief, Procurement Division, has responsibility for contract matters. Phone, 202–205–2730. Employment Information on employment can be obtained from the Director, Office of Personnel. The agency employs international economists, attorneys, accountants, commodity and industry specialists and analysts, and clerical and other support personnel. Phone, 202-205-2651. Publications The Commission publishes results of investigations concerning various commodities and subjects; it also publishes a series of reports on chemicals. Other publications include Industry and Trade Summaries, an annual report to the Congress on the operation of the trade agreements program; and an annual report to the Congress of Commission activities. Specific information regarding these publications can be obtained from the Office of the Secretary. Reading Rooms Reading rooms are open to the public in the Office of the Secretary and in the ITC National Library of International Trade and the ITC law library. Internet Commission publications, news releases, Federal Register notices, scheduling information, and general information about ITC are available for electronic access. Internet, http:// www.usitc.gov/. File transfer protocol, ftp://ftp.usitc.gov/.

For further information, contact the Secretary, United States International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436. Phone, 202-205–2000. Internet, http://www.usitc.gov/.

UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE
475 L'Enfant Plaza SW., Washington, DC 20260-0010
Phone, 202-268-2000

Board of Governors:
Chairman of the Board
Vice Chairman of the Board
Secretary of the Board
Governors

TIRSO DEL JUNCO
SAM WINTERS
THOMAS J. KOERBER
SUSAN E. ALVARADO, LEGREE S.

DANIELS, EINAR V. DYHRKOPP,
S. DAVID FINEMAN, BERT H.
MACKIE, NED R. MCWHERTER,

ROBERT F. RIDER
MARVIN RUNYON

MICHAEL S. COUGHLIN

MARVIN RUNYON

MICHAEL S. COUGHLIN WILLIAM J. HENDERSON

MICHAEL J. RILEY

LOREN E. SMITH

MARY S. ELCANO LARRY M. SPEAKES

Postmaster General and Chief Executive

Officer
Deputy Postmaster General
Management:
Postmaster General and Chief Executive

Officer
Deputy Postmaster General
Chief Operating Officer and Executive Vice

President
Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice

President
Chief Marketing Officer and Senior Vice

President
Senior Vice President and General Counsel
Senior Vice President, Corporate and

Legislative Affairs Vice President and Consumer Advocate Vice President, Controller Vice President, Diversity Development Vice President, Engineering Vice President, Facilities Vice President, Human Resources Vice President, Information Systems Vice President, International Business Vice President, Labor Relations Vice President, Legislative Affairs Vice President, Marketing Systems Vice President, Operations Redesign Vice President, Operations Support Vice President, Product Management Vice President, Purchasing and Materials Vice President, Quality Vice President, Retail Vice President, Sales Vice President, Strategic Initiatives

YVONNE D. MAGUIRE
M. RICHARD PORRAS
ROBERT F. HARRIS
WILLIAM J. DOWLING
RUDOLPH K. UMSCHEID
GAIL G. SONNENBERG
RICHARD D. WEIRICH
JAMES F. GRUBIAK
JOSEPH ). MAHON, JR.
GERALD J. MCKIERNAN
JOHN H. WARD
DIANE M. REGAN
ALLEN R. KANE
(VACANCY)
A. KEITH STRANGE
NORMAN E. LORENTZ
PATRICIA M. GIBERT
JOHN R. WARGO
DARRAH PORTER

Vice President, Technology Applications

ROBERT A.F. REISNER
Vice President, Workforce, Planning and

JAMES C. WALTON
Service Management
Judicial Officer

JAMES A. COHEN
Chief Postal Inspector and Inspector General KENNETH J. HUNTER
Deputy Chief Inspector, Criminal

JEFFREY J. DUPILKA
Investigations
Deputy Chief Inspector, Operations Support (VACANCY)
Deputy Chief Inspector, Audit

KENNETH C. WEAVER
Area Operations:
Vice President, Allegheny Area

JON STEELE
Vice President, Great Lakes Area

J.T. WEEKER Vice President, Mid-Atlantic Area

HENRY A. PANKEY Vice President, Mid-West Area

WILLIAM J. BROWN Vice President, New York Metro Area

JOHN F. KELLY Vice President, Northeast Area

NANCY L. GEORGE Vice President, Pacific Area

GENE R. HOWARD Vice President, Southeast Area

DAVID C. BAKKE Vice President, Southwest Area

CHARLES K. KERNAN Vice President, Western Area

CRAIG G. WADE (For the United States Postal Service statement of organization, see the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 39, Parts 221-226)

The United States Postal Service provides mail processing and delivery services to individuals and businesses within the United States. The Service is committed to serving customers through the development of efficient mail-handling systems and operates its own planning and engineering programs. It is also the responsibility of the Postal Service to protect the mails from loss or theft and to apprehend those who violate postal laws.

community post offices throughout the United States.

The Postal Service was created as an
independent establishment of the
executive branch by the Postal
Reorganization Act (39 U.S.C. 101 et
seq.), approved August 12, 1970. The
United States Postal Service commenced
operations on July 1, 1971.

The Postal Service has approximately 753,000 employees and handles about 181 billion pieces of mail annually. The chief executive officer of the Postal Service, the Postmaster General, is appointed by the nine Governors of the Postal Service, who are appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate for overlapping 9-year terms. The Governors and the Postmaster General appoint the Deputy Postmaster General, and these 11 people constitute the Board of Governors.

In addition to the national headquarters, there are area and district offices supervising approximately 39,000 post offices, branches, stations, and

Activities
In order to expand and improve service
to the public, the Postal Service is
engaged in customer cooperation
activities, including the development of
programs for both the general public and
major customers. The Consumer
Advocate, a postal ombudsman,
represents the interest of the individual
mail customer in matters involving the
Postal Service by bringing complaints
and suggestions to the attention of top
postal management and solving the
problems of individual customers. To
provide postal services responsive to
public needs, the Postal Service operates
its own planning, research, engineering,
real estate, and procurement programs
specially adapted to postal requirements

, and maintains close ties with international postal organizations.

[blocks in formation]
« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »