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1846 PROSPECTS OF THE JEWS;

OR,

A Series of Popular Lectures

ON THE

PROPHECIES

RELATIVE TO THE JEWISH NATION.

BY THE
REV. HUGH M'NEILE, M. A.

Minister of St. Jude's Church, Liverpool.

“Ye are my witnesses.”—Isaiah xliii. 10.

“To expound these predictions of the ancient prophets, of any thing but the restora.
tion of the natural Israel, is to introduce ambiguity and equivocation into the plainest
oracles of God.”--Bishop Horsley.

FROM THE SECOND LONDON EDITION.

WITH A PREFACE AND NOTES NOT IN THE FORMER EDITION.

PHILADELPHIA:

ORRIN ROGERS, 67 SOUTH SECOND STREET.

E. G. Dorsey, Printer.

1840.

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contrary unto them, and have brought them into the land of their enemies;

if then their uncircumcised hearts be humbled, and they then accept of

the punishment of their iniquity; then will I remember my covenant with

Jacob, and also my covenant with Isaac, and also my covenant with Abra-

ham will I remember; and I will remember the land.

Recapitulation of the former part of the subject--Entrance upon that part of

it which is future-What God has revealed concerning his purposes towards

the Jews, at and subsequent to the termination of the times of the Gentiles-

Their penitence, previous to their restoration, argued from, 1st, the language

of the predictions, in its natural and obvious meaning; 2ndly, the prayer of

Solomon; 3dly, the past deliverances of the Jews; 4thly, the analogy of sound

doctrine-Apparently opposing passages of Seripture considered—Their con-

version subsequent to their restoration-Bishop Lowth quoted,

74

LECTURE V.

THE JEWS SHALL BE RESTORED TO THEIR OWN LAND.

EZEK. xxxvii. 21, 22. Thus saith the Lord God, Behold, I will take the

children of Israel from anong the Heathen, whither they be gone; and

will gather them on every side, and bring them into their own land: and

I will make them one nation the land upon the mountains of Israel;

and one king shall be king to them all; and they shall be no more two

nations, neither shall they be divided into two kingdoms any more at all.

Various interpretations which have been given of the text considered; 1st,

the return of the Jews from Babylon; 2ndly, the conversion and sanctification

of the Christian church; 3dly, the mixture of the two; 4thly, the literal re.

occupation of Palestine by the twelve tribes—The last proved to be the correct

one, by its being the only one which is consistent throughout,

87

LECTURE VI.

PREFACE.

The following Lectures were originally delivered in London. My leading object in their composition was to make intelligible to large mixed congregations, a subject which I considered of great importance, and which I believed to be very rarely made the theme of popular discourse from the pulpit.

That subject is the purpose of God concerning the Jewish nation, as it is revealed in the Holy Scriptures. In examining this, my chief auxiliary has been the decision which history has already pronounced upon the right interpretation of prophetic language; and in my anticipations of the future, all I assume is, that the species of interpretation which events have rendered imperative, as it respects fulfilled prophecies, ought to be adhered to, with consistency and candour, in the examination of those prophecies which are as yet unfulfilled.

The language of the prophets is often, almost always, figurative in some degree: but the events predicted are not the less on that account literal events. When the Holy Ghost spake by the mouth of Zechariah, saying, Smite the shepherd, and the sheep shall be scattered, the language was figurative, our Lord not being literally a shepherd, neither his disciples sheep. But the event predicted in that figurative language was a literal event; and to the matter of fact, as it occurred in Gethsemane, the prophecy is applied by St. Matthew xxvi. 31. It is, therefore, no objection to the literal interpretation which I advocate, to say that the prophetic language is figurative. I admit that it is so-sometimes highly so. The question is, What do the figures mean? Do they mean other figures, or do they mean facts? My opinion is, that facts are the legitimate themes of prophecy. 'I appeal to history, comparing it with the prophetic volume, for the establishment of a principle by precedents; and I endeavour to convince by candid argumentation. I dogmatize not at all. I am open to conviction, when a more excellent way of interpreting the language of the

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