The Establishment of Modern English Prose in the Reformation and the Enlightenment

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Cambridge University Press, 1998 M12 3 - 218 pages
Ian Robinson traces the legacy of of prose writing as a form theorised and propagated as an art distinct from verse. Engaging with histories of rhetoric as well as the work of the great prose writers in English, Robinson provides a bold reappraisal of this literary form, and shows that the formal construct of the sentence itself is historically conditioned and no older than the post-medieval world. The relationship between rhetorical style and literary meaning, Robinson argues, is at the heart of the way we understand the external world.
 

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Contents

Sentence and period I
1
Prose rhythm
45
Syntax and period in Middle English
59
Cranmers commonwealth
71
Shakespeare us the wanderers
105
Drydens democracy
139
The prose world
151
Appendices
166
Medieval punctuation theory
185
Cranmer and the cursus
200
Texts frequently cited
209
Copyright

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