A View of Society and Manners in Italy: With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters, Volume 2

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A. Strahan and T. Cadell: And sold, 1795

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Page 52 - larum bell ? Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast, Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge. And in the visitation of the winds...
Page 53 - Canst thou, O partial sleep! give thy repose To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude; And, in the calmest and most stillest night, With all appliances and means to boot, Deny it to a king ? Then, happy low, lie down ! Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Page 52 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast, Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge. And in the visitation of the winds, Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deaf ning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes...
Page 77 - Christmas morning, when I was looking at two poor Calabrian pipers, doing their utmost to please her and the infant in her arms. They played for a full hour to one of her images, which stands at the corner of a street. All the other statues...
Page 440 - Nay, do not think I flatter ; For what advancement may I hope from thee That no revenue hast but thy good spirits, To feed and clothe thee ? Why should the poor be flatter'd ? No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning.
Page 149 - Pausilippo^ in huts, or in caverns or chambers dug out of that mountain. Some gain a livelihood by fishing, others by carrying burdens to and from the shipping; many walk about the streets ready to run on errands, or to perform any labour in their power for a very small recompense.
Page 52 - Nature's foft nurfe, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down, And fteep my fenfes in forgetfulnefs ? Why rather...
Page 76 - The fenfibility of fome of the audience gave me an idea of the power of founds, which the dulnefs of my own auditory nerves could never have conveyed to my mind. At certain airs, filent...
Page 56 - IN their external deportment, the Italians have a grave folemnity of manner, which is fometimes thought to arife from a natural gloominefs of difpofition. The French, above all other nations, are apt to impute to melancholy, the ft date ferious air which accompanies reflection.
Page 41 - VOL. 11. a the air, like a celestial being. The instant he appeared, the music struck up, the bells rung from every church, and the cannon thundered from the castle of St. Angelo In repeated peals. During the intervals, the church of St. Peter's, the palace of the Vatican, and the banks of the Tiber, re-echoed the acclamations of the populace. At length his holiness arose from his seat, and an immediate and awful silence ensued.

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