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NEW YORK, N. Y., July 13, 1945. Senator Tom CONNALLY,

Chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations: At the instance of the president of the American Bar Association I wish to advise you of the approval of the council of the section of international and comparative law of the Charter of the United Nations Organization signed June 16, 1945, at San Francisco as a preliminary step in the right direction presupposing that the Congress of the United States will take the further steps necessary to implement the Charter and to assure the maintenance of the economic and military strength of the United States so as to enable it to play its part in preserving world peace.

MITCHELL B. CARROLL, Chairman.

OMAHA, NEBR., July 13, 1945. Hon. Tom CONNALLY,

Chairman, Foreign Relations Committee: Two hundred Omaha North Side Woman's Club members heartily endorse ratification of United Nations Charter.

Mrs. GEORGE GILBERT, President.

CUSTER, S. Dax., July 13, 1945. Tom CONNALLY, Chairman, Senate Foreign Relations Committee,

Washington, D. C.: The Custer Women's Civic Club composed of 65 women representative of the community are in favor of the ratification of the Charter of the United Nations.

HELEN SANFORD, Secretary,
Lucy BROYLES, pro tempore.

Tacoma, WASH., July 13, 1945. SENATOR Tom CONNALLY,

Washington, D. C.: Necessary President Truman be supported by ratified Charter when Potsdam meeting convened. Since American public approves acceptance of Charter we urge its immediate ratification.

Tacoma WOMEN'S COUNCIL FOR DEMOCRACY,

SEATTLE, WASH., July 13, 1945. Senator CONNALLY,

Chairman, Foreign Relations Committee, Washington, D. C.: International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 1-19 urges immediate passage of World Security Charter without crippling amendments.

Wm. VEAUX, Secretary.

SEATTLE, WASH., July 13, 1945. Tom CONNALLY, Chairman, Foreign Affairs Committee,

Washington, D. C.: The United Fishermen's Union of the Pacific are supporting Philip Murray in his plea for favorable action on the United Nations Charter as necessary for the future peace of the world.

ANTON SUSANJ, Secretary-Treasurer.

New YORK, N. Y., July 14, 1945. Hon. Tom CONNALLY,

Chairman of Foreign Relations Committee: I wish to congratulate you in your efforts toward peace as repeated in many statements of the new Charter and emphasized in the following words: “The principle of equal rights and self-determination promotion and encouragement of respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms for all."

It seems that there are other provisions which contradict these noble words. I hope you will disregard such contradictory sections and thus promote world-wide peace.

Mrs. J. SERGEANT CRAM,

The Peace House.

FORT WORTH, Tex., July 12, 1945. Senator Tom CONNALLY,

Washington, D. C.: Our full support for San Francisco agreement. Proud of you for splendid work to promote it. May God lead Senate to approve it.

WOMAN'S SOCIETY OF CARISTIAN SERVICE,

HIGHLAND PARK METHODIST CHURCH.

Baton Rouge, LA., July 12, 1945. Hon. Tom CONNALLY,

Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Washington, D. C.: Behind you 100 percent in your efforts for ratification. Call upon us if we can in any way assist you.

E. M. CULVER,
Adviser to Department of Education,
Louisiana Federation of Women's Clubs.

CHICAGO, ILL., July 12, 1945. Senator CONNALLY,

Chairman, United Nations Charter Senate Hearing: Our organization, Women of America, dedicated to the preservation of our constitutional form of government, believes the immediate adoption of the United Nations Charter will solidify all countries, materially lessen the possibilities of world conflicts, and will have a decided influence in shortening the present war. We feel that every real American should be working for the adoption of this Charter.

Mrs. MARY E. KENNY,

National President,

NEW YORK, N. Y., July 12, 1945. Senator Tom CONNALLY,

Foreign Relations Committee, United States Senate, Washington, D. C.: The board of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs meeting here this week urge that the Senate Foreign Relations Committee recommend to the Senate by unanimous vote favorable consideration of the Charter of the United Nations.

MARGARET A. HICKEY, President.

CAMDEN, N. J., July 12, 19.45. Hon. Tom CONNALLY, Chairman, Foreign Relations Committee,

Senate Office Building, Washington, D. C.: The delegates of the South Jersey Industrial Union Council, CIO, Unanimously passed a resolution at their meeting July 11, 1945, fully endorsing the United Nations Charter. We respectfully request that the United States Senate speedily

approve this document and thus lay a foundation for a world in which war will be considered a crime against humanity. We respectfully urge you to vote for this Charter without any reservations. Sincerely yours,

ERNEST KORNFELD,

District Representative.

BEAVER, Pa., July 12, 1945. Hon. Tom CONNALLY, Chairman, Senate Foreign Relations Committee,

Washington, D. C.: The Woman's Club of Beaver, Pa., is encouraged by your courageous stand in urging the early ratification of the Charter of United Nations. Hope you will continue to influence other Şenate Members to speed action in approving this measure so vital to the whole world.

MRS. Elwood P. HUGHES.

Los ANGELES, CALIF., July 12, 1945. Senator Tom -CONNALLY, Chairman of Foreign Relations Committee,

Senate Office Building, Washington, D. C.: Three hundred and fifty members wish to commend you for your stand and leadership for the United Nations Charter. The American people will be very proud to have United States the first of the great powers to ratify this world Charter.

HOLLYWOOD Women's Council.

NEW YORK, N. Y., July 12, 1945. Hon. Tom CONNALLY, Chairman, Senate Foreign Relations Committee,

Washington, D. C.: MY DEAR SENATOR: On behalf of the directors and 50,000 members of the American League for a Free Palestine, an American nonsectarian nonpartisan membership.organization, I wish to urge the speedy ratification by the Senate of the United Nations Charter.

It is imperative that the United States continue with the role of leadership that it displayed when, under the late President Roosevelt, it initiated the organization of the United Nations. The world is in dire need of the continuation and further development of that leadership. Together with an overwhelming majority of the American people, we enthusiastically acclaim President Truman's policies as expressed in his message to the Senate on the Charter.

The enormous and bloody sacrifices of this war must not be in vain as were the sacrifices of all previous wars. The League of Nations failed because it abandoned the moral foundation upon which it was built and because we were not there to maintain that moral foundation which was given to the League by one of America's greatest Presidents.

Woodrow Wilson was right and the price for our refusal to recognize this fact is over a million American casualties and some 50,000,000 casualties of other nations. Today once again providence has thrust upon our nation the heavy burden and glorious opportunity of initiating a world leadership of morality and justice in which human decency prevails and which is the only guaranty for a peaceful world order enabling the progress of all nations and their development in an atmosphere of freedom ard good neighborliness rather than despotism and

The American League for a Free Palestine came into being as a result of these American traditions and aspirations. It seeks the solution of one of the world's gravest and most shameful problems, a problem which has repeatedly threatened the peace of the world and which has perpetually victimized and decimated the population of the great Hebrew Nation.

We cannot and should not ignore the millions of Hebrew casualties in Europe. We cannot and should not ignore their survivors who now more than ever deserve the right of self-determination and of a free life on the soil of their ancient national territory-Palestine.

war.

President Wilson was an ardent believer in the rebuilding and reestablishment of Palestine and it was mostly due to his efforts that the League of Nations recognized the justice and necessity of this historic development. Every President and every Congress of the United States since then has reiterated the desire of the American people to see the fulfillment of that aim. It will be impossible for the Charter to succeed in its purpose of maintaining world peace so long as one section of the world's population continues to suffer under a historic injustice.

In sending you this message for inclusion in the record of the bearings of your committee on the Charter, I do so, confident that the splendid work you did at San Francisco will not be wasted for want of fulfillment of all the ideals and all the traditions of the American people. Sincerely,

HARRY Louis SELDEN, Cochairman, American League for a Free Palestine.

THE NATIONAL BOARD OF THE YOUNG WOMENS
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

New York 22, N. Y., July 12, 1945.
Senator Tom CONNALLY,
Chairman, Foreign Relations Committee,

Senate Office Building, Washington, D. C. DEAR Sir: One June 27, 1945, the following action was taken:

Voted: “That the National Board of the YWCA heartily endorse the Charter of the United Nations as a solid structure upon which peace can be built,

We urge prompt ratification of the Charter by the United States Senate and full cooperation by our government and people in the task of building a world order based on law, justice and human welfare."

This action is a culmination of many years of support by the Young Womens Christian Associations of the United States of the principle of collective security, The national convention in 1924 endorsed entrance into the League of Nations, making the YWCA the first women's organization to give such support to the League. This action was reaffirmed in subsequent conventions. During the war, the national board has worked for the establishment of a general international organization, and its public-affairs program adopted in December 1944 endorsed the Dumbarton Oaks proposals.

The national convention which was to have been held in April of this year was canceled for transportation reasons. Instead, stay-at-home meetings in community and student YWCA's afforded even wider opportunity for discussion and vote on issues confronting us as Christian women and as citizens. Included was the public-affairs program mentioned above. Unanimously and with great vigor, the local meetings approved "acceptance by the United States of membership in the United Nations Organization, and full support of its principles as a step toward the greater development of international organization." The only qualifications were made by some associations who thought that the stand of the national board could have been even stronger.

In endorsing the Charter of the United Nations as “a solid structure upon which peace can be built," the national board of the YWCA recognizes the great importance of national acts and policies essential to carry out the lofty purposes of the Charter, We know that the United States has a primary responsibility in making the United Nations effective. An immediate and obvious step is to provide a contingent of armed forces for use by the Security Council, and to authorize our representative on that body to commit their use without reference to Congress on each occasion when aggression threatens. We believe that such authorization is a logical development of the United States policy of executive action to protect national interest by the use of force. Modern methods of warfare make it essential for the upholders of peace to act as swiftly as the breakers of peace, Furthermore, assurance of such prompt action by the United States and other nations would go far in deterring potential aggressors:

The national board of the YWCA urges an immediate and overwhelming vote by your committee and by the Senate in accepting without reservations the Charter of the United Nations. We stand ready to support action in political, economic, and social fields essential for building, on the foundation of the Charter, a world of peace and justice. Sincerely yours,

Mrs. HENRY A. INGRAHAM,

President.

COMMISSION ON WORLD PEACE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH,

Chicago 11, II., July 12, 1945. Senator Tom CONNALLY, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. DEAR SENATOR CONNALLY: I am writing to you and the Foreign Relations Committee in two capacities; first, as executive secretary of the Commission on World Peace of the Methodist Church; and, second, as one who was present at the San Francisco Conference from April 22' to June 27. It was my privilege to be accredited by the State Department as an "observer," as a "press representative" writing for the church press, and as a “consultant” for the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, taking Dr. Walter Van Kirk's place beginning June 1.

As executive secretary of the Commission on World Peace, I am informing the Committee on Foreign Relations through you, that we have taken action supporting ratification of the United Nations Charter. We believe our people are ready for this action.

We are sending a mailing beginning today, to 26,000 Methodist leaders. These include our 23,000 Methodist ministers who are being asked, as you will see in the accompanying material, to read the Federal Council's statement from the pulpit Sunday, July 22, and to urge all of our people to support Senate ratification. This appeal is signed by Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, president of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, and chairman of the Crusade for a New World Order of the Methodist Church.

The action of our commission and my appeal to the church to support complete unanimity in the Senate is contained in the letter and brief summary of the San Francisco Conference. Copies of the letter of Bishop Oxnam, .of the Federal Council's statement, and of my summary, are enclosed.

Writing as one of the consultants to the United States delegation, I want to add my prayer and hope that the Senate will take unanimous action in ratifying the Charter. I believe this will have an influence for good, an influence for peace, among all the nations of the orld. May I report to the committee my very great appreciation for the consecrated and outstanding labors of the United States delegation, which so successfully and brilliantly gave leadership amidst the difficult problems, and contributed so much to the final result.

Speaking particularly from the point of view of a churchman, I am grateful for the deep religious spirit and moral earnestness which characterized the members of the United States delegation, and for the sense of moral responsibility which pervaded the United Nations Conference. With kind regards, I am Sincerely yours,

CHARLES F. Boss, Jr.,

Executive Secretary.

THE CRUSADE FOR A NEW WORLD ORDER

LED BY THE COUNCIL OF BISHOPS OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

JULY 12, 1945. To Each Methodist Minister in the United States."

MY DEAR BROTHER: I. The final decision is about to be taken. There is no time for letters. To be effective, send a telegram to your Senators at once. Urge them to vote for the ratification of the Charter of the United Nations.

II. Please read the enclosed statement adopted by the executive committee of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America to your congregation on July 22. This will be done in thousands of our churches across the country. With kindest regards, believe me. Ever sincerely yours,

G. BROMLEY OXNAM.

COMMISSION ON WORLD PEACE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH,

Chicago, Il., July 12, 1945. DEAR FRIEND: The following brief summary of my experience at the United Nations Conference on International Organization at San Francisco is presented now while the United States Senate is considering the ratification of the United

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