Sketches of the Philosophy of Morals

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H. Colburn and Company, 1822 - 369 pages
 

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Page 252 - Surely every medicine is an innovation, and he that will not apply new remedies must expect new evils ; for time is the greatest innovator ; and if time of course alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end...
Page 88 - ... is so much ease from all pain, and so much present pleasure, as without which any one cannot be content. Now, because pleasure and pain are produced in us by the operation of certain objects either on our minds or our bodies, and in different degrees, therefore what has an aptness to produce pleasure in us is that we call "good...
Page 319 - For he was of that stubborn crew Of errant saints, whom all men grant To be the true church militant ; Such as do build their faith upon The holy text of pike and gun ; Decide all controversies by Infallible artillery ; And prove their doctrine orthodox By apostolic blows and knocks...
Page 91 - MORAL GOOD AND EVIL, then, is only THE CONFORMITY OR DISAGREEMENT OF OUR VOLUNTARY ACTIONS TO SOME LAW, WHEREBY GOOD OR EVIL IS DRAWN ON US, FROM THE WILL AND POWER OF THE LAW-MAKER...
Page 328 - ... keep the word of promise to the ear, and break it to the hope" — we have presumed to court the assistance of the friends of the drama to strengthen our infant institution.
Page iii - ... must be gainers. For if the lute be not well tuned, the musician fails of his harmony. And in our present state, the operations of the mind, so far depend on the right tone or good condition of its instrument, that anything which greatly contributes to preserve or recover the health of the body, is well worth the attention of the mind.
Page xiv - human animal," these philosophers "deny that any traces of " such an agent" are to be discoverable in the phenomena of life; and having traced the functional powers to certain elementary formations, which they term tissues, and being wholly unable to carry these investigations...
Page 297 - The RIGHT I revere is not the RIGHT adored by sycophants ; the Jus vagum, the capricious command of princes or ministers. I follow the LAW of God (what is Laid down by him for the rule of my conduct) when I follow the LAWS of human nature ; which, without any human testimony, we know mui^t proceed from God: and upon these are founded the BIGHTS of man, or what is ordered for man.
Page 59 - The fecundity of the Herring is astonishing. It has been calculated that if the offspring of a single Herring could be suffered to multiply unmolested and undiminished for twenty years, they would exhibit a bulk ten times the size of the earth.
Page 117 - L'homme, en général, a toujours été ce qu'il est: cela ne veut pas dire qu'il ait toujours eu de belles villes, du canon de vingt-quatre livres de balle, des opéras-comiques, et des couvents de religieuses.

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