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him very many years, and can, with the most confident satisfaction, speak to the integrity, steadiness, and correctness of his conduct. He has been highly respectable and respected, and still lives in the esteem of all who know him : he possesses a religious fortitude of mind, although he is “ a man acquainted with grief,” and looks, with anxious hope, to be able to bear up against the storms of adversity, and to the protection and maintenance of a large family, now motherless.

I remain, Sir,
Your obedient Servant,

B. O.

To the Rev. JOHN POTTICARY, BLACKHEATH.

MY DEAR SIR,

Royal Exchange, January 21, 1819. Your kind care of, and attention to, my little boy, deserves something more than thanks: I have therefore to request you will consider him in your establishment as having reached his twelfth year, and charge me accordingly.

My kind regards to your family, and

Believe me to be, dear Sir,
Yours always,

B. O.

To GEORGE RANKING, Esq. CHEAPSIDE.

MY DEAR SIR,

Tavistock Place, February 25, 1819.

Many thanks to you for your very amusing present.

I have read, with much pleasure, the observations

respecting the authenticity of Junius, and fall completely into the opinion of the ingenious author of the letters addressed to a Noble Lord. I think the motive of action is strongly made out, and strongly corroborated by the action ceasing when the Noble Duke accomplished his object.

A little evil to an individual has done a great public good, by adding to the stock of epistolary literature some of the best specimens in our language.

I beg my remembrances to your brother, and request you will bear in mind what I verbally expressed to you, my wish, and the pleasure it will afford me, to see you in Tavistock Place.

I have the honour to be, dear Sir,
Your obliged Friend,

B. 0.

To CHARLES WARD, Esq.

MY DEAR SIR,

March 22, 1819. In the list of Vice-Presidents for the ensuing anniversary of the Drury Lane Theatrical Fund, I find I am styled a M.P.; in consequence of which I have been solicited by my friends to give them franks. This I found very troublesome, and therefore told them I should accept the Chiltern hundreds. Be so good then, if I am to be identified with Old Drury, to let me appear in my own character when next you bring me before the public.

Yours, &c.

B. O.

To Colonel GARDNER, &c. &c. HORSE GUARDS.

MY DEAR SIR,

Tavistock Place, March 22, 1819.

I HAVE received a letter from a lady in Ireland, written at the request of Mrs. Carnie, of a very melancholy description. I have too much reason to fear you anticipate its contents. As I intend answering it to-day, I could wish you would furnish me with what particulars you know about Colonel Carnie, when and where he embarked in the terrific vessel, which, there is too much reason to fear, encloses the body of our dear and excellent friend.

Late in December the Colonel dined with me, and subsequently called upon me in the city, when, if I understood him right, he expected to leave town in a few days. This was about the first or second week in January

If you can, under these fearful apprehensions, say any thing to alleviate the anxieties of Mrs. Carnie, I shall be most happy to convey it to her. I beg you to accept my inquiries after your health, and

Believe me to be, dear Sir,
Yours always,

B. O.

To MRS. CARNIE, KINSALE, IRELAND.

MY DEAR MADAM,

Tavistock Place, March 22, 1819.

IMMEDIATELY upon the receipt of Mrs. Austin's letter, I addressed one to Colonel Gardner,

a report is certainly in existence of the melancholy event you mention having occurred; but I am by no means satisfied of its being founded in fact.” And also I have inquired at Lloyd's, where I found that the packet sailed on the 28th of January for Cork, and that fifty guineas per cent have been given to ensure her.

who says,

While there is a hope, do not, my dear madam, despair; nor, at the same time, lay too flattering an expectation to your heart.

If my sympathy, or that of Mrs. Oakley and my family, can at all tend to alleviate your feelings in this most anxious moment of doubt, we offer it in the sincerity of friendship. I shall be most glad to communicate to you any thing favourable ; and the moment I hear it, no time shall be lost in forwarding it to you.

I think it was in the first or second week in January I shook hands with my worthy friend, and learned his intention of leaving town in a few days. He had, with his son, previously dined with me in Tavistock Place, and gratified the ladies and myself with a favourable account of your health. If it has been the will of Heaven to finish his earthly campaign, you, and all who knew him, have the bright hope of his immortal happiness: to that will we must bow with reverential

awe.

Believe me to be, my dear Madam,
Your sympathizing Friend,

B. O.

To MRS. GEORGE OAKLEY.

MY DEAR SISTER,

Tavistock Place, March 27, 1819. I NEED not be reminded, that when you make pecuniary requests to me, they are in behalf of

my

own family.” Alas! I cannot but feel the degradation - I cannot but feel its pressure also, although what may be expected of me may appear insignificant to those who measure out my means by the appearance I make in society. I was told the other day, by a poor mendicant at my gate, “ that he was sure I could relieve him, because I lived in a large house." “My good friend,” I replied, " that is the very reason why I cannot assist you.” However, I can, when occasion demands it, abridge my luxuries to relieve the helpless; and therefore send you the enclosed draft, to be applied in any way your gentle and philanthropic nature directs.

Yours affectionately,

B. 0.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE LITERARY JOURNAL,

UPON The SQUABBLES OF ACTORS AND AUTHORS.

SIR,

March 27, 1819.

It is very seldom I trouble you with my sentiments, or trouble myself about the squabbles between actors and authors, or between the public and managers of theatres; but the recent controversy between Mr. Kean and Mr. Bucke has become so generally mentioned, that it is impossible not to take an interest in it.

I confess, when first I read Mr. Kean's letter, that I could not help admiring it: there is a boldness of feature about it, and such a manly expression of indignation, that brought the very person of Kean before me, with almost the same impression I have felt when seeing him act. I did not discover any vulgarity in it, as

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