Moses, God, and the Dynamics of Intercessory Prayer: A Study of Exodus 32-34 and Numbers 13-14

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Mohr Siebeck, 2004 - 403 pages
Michael Widmer reconsiders the significance of the canonical portrayal of Moses as intercessor in the aftermath of documentary pentateuchal criticism. Paying careful attention to both the diachronic and synchronic dimensions of the text, at the heart of this study is a close reading of Exodus 32-34 and Numbers 13-14 in their final form with particular focus on the nature and theological function of Moses' prayers. These intercessions evoke important theological questions, especially with regard to divine reputation, covenant loyalty, visitation, and mutability.The author's investigation makes evident not only that Moses' prayers embody an important hermeneutical key to biblical theology, but also that Moses sets an important biblical paradigm for authentic prayer. Moreover, Michael Widmer argues that YHWH's fullest revelation of His name is enacted in a specific and concrete situation in the scout narrative (Nu. 13-14). Thus the latter stands as a kind of commentary on Exodus 34:6-7.

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Contents

Introduction
3
Prayer in the Old Testament
9
168
45
Hermeneutical Reflections
57
Prophetic Intercession
72
Introduction
89
Costly Solidarity
123
Engaging God Face to Face
142
A Canonical Reading of Numbers 1314
254
Moses Intercessory Prayer and Gods Response
281
173
322
Concluding Summary
329
Numbers 1314
339
Prophetic Intercession and Gods Holy Mutability
345
Bibliography
351
189
353

2023
162
The Revelation of Gods Name
169
The Covenant Mediator
204
Introduction
229
A Historical Critical Reading
236

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About the author (2004)

Michael Widmer, Born 1970; 1996 BA. in Theology at London School of Theology; 1998 M.Th. in Old Testament & Hermeneutics at London School of Theology; 2003 Ph.D. in Old Testament at University of Durham; currently working at the University library, Durham England.

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