The Entomologist's Monthly Magazine

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Entomologist's Monthly Magazine Limited, 1884
 

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Page 139 - She was a Phantom of delight When first she gleamed upon my sight; A lovely Apparition, sent To be a moment's ornament; Her eyes as stars of Twilight fair; Like Twilight's, too, her dusky hair; But all things else about her drawn From May-time and the cheerful Dawn; A dancing Shape, an Image gay, To haunt, to startle, and way-lay.
Page 38 - HISTORICAL VIEW OF THE PROGRESS OF DISCOVERY ON THE MORE NORTHERN COASTS OF NORTH AMERICA.
Page 232 - To tell of thy loving-kindness early in the morning, and of thy truth in the night season ; 3 Upon an instrument of ten strings, and upon the lute ; upon a loud instrument, and upon the harp: 4 For thou, Lord, hast made me glad through thy works; and I will rejoice in giving praise for the operations of thy hands.
Page 29 - Posterior tibise clothed with dense long hairs above. Forewings with vein 1 furcate, upper fork partially obsolete, 2 from f of cell, 3 and 4 approximated at base, 7 and 8 stalked, 7 to costa, 11 from middle of cell.
Page 84 - ... returning each time after flying away about five or six yard-. . . . The flight ended that night about 8 pm, having been incessant for more than twelve hours. On the 27th they appeared again about noon, flying the same course, but in much reduced forces. Each day since I have seen a few, but very few. . . . The papers say they were observed in all southern and Central Sweden, and in many places in Denmark, and they 1 I mention a hen as foster-mother because the ducklings can have n > instinctive...
Page 275 - Notices of some new Species of Strepsipterous Insects from Albania, with further Observations on the Habits and Transformations of these Parasites," in which several unknown points in the economy of these insects are elucidated. Mr. Douglas read a continuation of his "Memoir on the Natural History of British Micro-Lepidoptera...
Page 49 - ... black, at least apically. acute, divergent, two-thirds or fully as long as vertex, slightly pubescent. Antennae about one and a half times as long as width of head, segment III thicker than succeeding segments. Thorax strongly arched, punctate. Hind tibiae with three apical spines on inner side. Wings about two and a half to two and twothirds times as long as broad, narrowly rounded to subacute at apex; Rs usually rather short. Genitalia. — Male. — Genital segment very large; anal valve very...
Page 273 - After watching the butterfly for a time I seized it by the wings between my thumb and fingers with the greatest ease, so utterly lost did it appear to be to what was going on near it. In another spot I saw as many as sixteen of these large butterflies within the space of a square foot, all engaged in the same strange action.
Page 273 - ... to what was going on near it. In another spot, I saw as many as sixteen of these large butterflies within the space of a square foot, all engaged in the same strange action. Some of them emitted the liquid more frequently than others ; and one of them squirted the liquid so as to drop fully a quarter or a third of an inch beyond the point on the ground, perpendicular with the end of its body. It was at this spot that I saw the second species of butterflies alluded to also engaged in the same...
Page 12 - ... was not successful. Then, these methods of enticing the insects were completed by inverting a round quake (a wide-mouthed basket of very open wicker-work) over the bait, taking care to raise the quake so that its lower edge was some inches from the ground. The butterflies attracted by the flowers, made their way under the raised edge of the quake, and when the Indians approached flew, not out under the edge of the quake, but upward into the top, where they were captured.

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