History of South Africa (1486-1691)

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S. Sonnenschein, Lowrey, & Company, 1888 - 430 pages
 

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Page 382 - Mr. Biggs' work is very thorough, and he has managed to compress a good deal of information into a limited space.
Page 3 - ... found a piece of the shaft, including the part originally placed in the ground, altogether about six feet in length, propped up by means of large stones, crossed at the top by a broken fragment, which had originally formed the whole length of the shaft. This was six feet above ground, and twenty-one inches beneath, composed of marble rounded on One side, but left square on the other, evidently for the inscription, which, however, the unsparing- hand of Time, in a lapse of nearly three centuries...
Page 14 - Guinea; notwithstanding we ran hard aboard the cape, finding the report of the Portugals to be most false, who affirm that it is the most dangerous cape of the world, never without intolerable storms and present danger to travellers which come near the same. This cape is a most stately thing, and the fairest cape we saw in the whole circumference of the earth, and we passed by it the 18.
Page 320 - ... one who has a mission to do some particular work has a good office given him. Still, where life is too prominently regarded in this light, the view of life as a mission tends to supersede the view of it as trial and probation. The mission becomes the final cause of life. The generality may be born to do their duty in that station of life in which it has pleased God to call them...
Page 2 - S., but in reality it was 26|, so imperfect were the means then known for determining it. There he cast anchor, and for the first time Christian men trod the soil of Africa south of the tropic. A more desolate place than that on which the weary seamen landed could hardly be, and no mention is made by the early Portuguese historians of any sign of human life being observed as far as the explorers wandered. Unfortunately the original journal or log-book of the expedition has long since disappeared...
Page 368 - Their views of rights and liberties were not those of to-day, because they were men of the seventeenth, not of the nineteenth century. But they possessed a full share of the sturdy spirit of independence which led the people of the Netherlands on more than one occasion within that century to risk life and property in defence of freedom. They may be the poorest, but they are not the least courageous or liberty-loving people of any country who go forth to found colonies in distant lands. And assuredly...
Page 350 - Dutch, whether they would or not. On both sides very rash words were uttered. In open meeting the French resolved not to intermarry with the Dutch, forgetting apparently that if such a resolution could be carried out, most of them could never marry at all. There were individuals among them who did not scruple to say that having braved the anger of the great king of France, they would be ashamed of themselves if they were afraid of the commander Van der Stel. Many of the Dutch colonists ceased to...
Page 320 - The method of target shooting in those days was so peculiar as to merit a description. A figure resembling a parrot, and hence called a papegaai, was fixed upon a pole in the centre of a circle with a radius of sixty feet. The marksmen chose their positions upon an arc of this circle in the order in which they paid the subscription fees, which were to residents of Stellenbosch one shilling, and to all others four shillings. They fired in the same order, standing and without rests for their guns....
Page 42 - He had spent some time on board an English ship, in which he had visited Bantam, and had acquired a smattering of the language of those among whom he had lived.
Page 335 - ... colonizing country. A few of the refugees who left France between 1670 and 1685 entered into the service of the East India Company, and some of these were stationed in South Africa. Dominique de Chavonnes, the officer in command of the garrison at this time, was one. On the 3rd of October 1685 the Chamber of Seventeen passed a resolution to send out French refugees with other emigrants, but so few were found willing to leave Europe that in the course of two years only three or four were obtained....

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