The New Statistical Account of Scotland: Renfrew, Argyle

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W. Blackwood and Sons, 1845
 

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Page 320 - PUT them in mind to be subject to principalities and powers, to obey magistrates, to be ready to every good work, 2 To speak evil of no man, to be no brawlers, but gentle, shewing all meekness unto all men.
Page 417 - ... used to address his younger friends, that was always felt by them as an endearing mark of his kindness and familiarity, — and prized accordingly, far beyond all the solemn compliments that ever proceeded from the lips of authority. His voice was deep and powerful, — though he commonly spoke in a low and somewhat monotonous tone, which harmonized admirably with the weight and brevity of his observations ; and set off...
Page 387 - With such vehement force and might He did his body gore, The staff ran through the other side, A large cloth-yard and more. So thus did both these nobles die, Whose courage none could stain.
Page 416 - Mr. Watt was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, in 1784, of the Royal Society of London in 1785, and a corresponding member of the Batavian Society in 1787.
Page 415 - It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal like wax, before it, — draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin, and forge anchors, — cut steel into ribands, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.
Page 415 - The trunk of an elephant, that can pick up a pin or rend an oak, is as nothing to it. It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal before it; draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin and forge anchors, cut steel into ribbons, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.
Page 417 - All men of learning and science were his cordial friends; and such was the influence of his mild character and perfect fairness and liberality, even upon the pretenders to these accomplishments, that he lived to disarm even envy itself, and died, we verily believe, without a single enemy.
Page 417 - ... a finer expression of reposing strength, and mild self-possession in his manner, than we ever recollect to have met with in any other person. He had in his character the utmost abhorrence for all sorts of forwardness, parade, and pretensions ; and indeed never failed to put all such impostors out of countenance, by the manly plainness and honest intrepidity of his language and deportment.
Page 415 - It was by his inventions that its action was so regulated as to make it capable of being applied to the finest and most delicate manufactures, and its power so increased as to set weight and solidity at defiance. By his admirable...
Page 319 - Bays the learned historian of lona, " as far as we may judge from that of Columba, was at least comparatively pure. As he was himself much given to the study of the Holy Scriptures...

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