The Portuguese in South Africa: With a Description of the Native Races Between the River Zambesi and the Cape of Good Hope During the Sixteenth Century

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T.F. Unwin, 1896 - 332 pages
 

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Page 195 - Guinea; notwithstanding we ran hard aboard the cape, finding the report of the Portugals to be most false, who affirm that it is the most dangerous cape of the world, never without intolerable storms and present danger to travellers which come near the same. This cape is a most stately thing, and the fairest cape we saw in the whole circumference of the earth, and we passed by it the 18.
Page 297 - It is understood that in tracing the frontier along the slope of the plateau no territory west of longitude 32░ 30...
Page 249 - ... make the higher indisputably the ruling race, no part of Africa can be brought permanently within the domains of civilisation, and for settlement by Caucasians the portion of the continent along the Indian ocean north of Delagoa Bay was then not at all adapted. On the lower terraces facing the sea and on the banks of the Zambesi fever is endemic, and white children rarely grow up. On the highlands of the interior and in some localities on the third terrace upward from the ocean the climate is...
Page 81 - S., but in reality it was 26|░, so imperfect were the means then known for determining it. There he cast anchor, and for the first time Christian men trod the soil of Africa south of the tropic. A more desolate place than that on which the weary seamen landed could hardly be, and no mention is made by the early Portuguese historians of any sign of human life being observed as far as the explorers wandered. Unfortunately the original journal or log-book of the expedition has long since disappeared...
Page 65 - ... and paved with large square stones. The front corridor is seven feet wide. The separating wall is very massive, and has three doors, a large one in the centre, and a smaller one on each side. In this corridor, on each side of the principal door, is a large tablet of hieroglyphics, each thirteen feet long and eight feet high, and each divided into two hundred and forty squares of characters or symbols.
Page 231 - Lord of the Conquest, Navigation, and Commerce of Ethiopia, Arabia, Persia, and India.
Page 158 - ... exhort the people to become Christians. There is a custom of the Bantu, with which they were of course unacquainted, not to dispute with honoured guests, but to profess agreement with whatever is stated. This is regarded by those people as politeness, and it is carried to such an absurd extent that it is often difficult to obtain correct information from them. Thus if one asks a man, is it far to such a place ? politeness requires him to reply it is far, though it may be close by. The questioner,...
Page 11 - ... mat on the side from which the wind was blowing : a little grass at the bottom of the hole formed a bed, and though it was not much larger than the nest of an ostrich, a whole family would manage to lie down in it.
Page 296 - Loangwa, runs directly southwards as far as the 16th parallel of south latitude, follows that parallel to its intersection with the 31st degree of longitude east of Greenwich, thence running eastward direct to the point where the River Mazoe is intersected by the 33rd degree of longitude east of Greenwich ; it follows that degree southward to its intersection by the 18░ 30...
Page 127 - ... that they did not cross to the south of the Limpopo till a much later date. Professor Keane contends that the Bantu peoples arrived from the north and settled in South-East Africa at least two thousand years ago. Dr. Theal also states : " Of the various Bantu tribes south of the Zambesi the Makalangas appeared to have a larger proportion of Asiatic blood in their veins than any of the others, which will account for their mental and mechanical superiority. Almost at first sight the Europeans observed...

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