Identities, Affiliations, and Allegiances

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Seyla Benhabib, Ian Shapiro, Danilo Petranovich
Cambridge University Press, 2007 M08 2
Where do political identities come from, how do they change over time, and what is their impact on political life? This book explores these and related questions in a globalizing world where the nation state is being transformed, definitions of citizenship are evolving in unprecedented ways, and people's interests and identities are taking on new local, regional, transnational, cosmopolitan, and even imperial configurations. Pre-eminent scholars examine the changing character of identities, affiliations, and allegiances in a variety of contexts: the evolving character of the European Union and its member countries, the Balkans and other new democracies of the post-1989 world, and debates about citizenship and cultural identity in the modern West. These essays are essential reading for anyone interested in the political and intellectual ferment that surrounds debates about political membership and attachment, and will be of interest to students and scholars in the social sciences, humanities, and law.
 

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Contents

place territory and identity
67
diaspora identity
83
4 Political boundaries in a
85
II Nested and overlapping political boundaries
90
IV Supranational political integration in Europe
104
beyond
113
than moral appeals and pedagogy and it is thus institutional
121
Citizenship and representation in the European Union
126
10 Nonterritorial boundaries of citizenship
226
section V articulates the functions of selfrule and selfprotection and
230
V The functions of selfrule and selfprotection
247
Boundaries of selfrule
251
Jurisdictions
254
marriage and family law by states and religious communities has
255
redefining
257
territoriality
260

6 Soft borders and transnational citizens
136
Multiple allegiances
141
reintegration have not been sufficiently sensitive to political
148
VI Conclusion
158
redefining
159
III Nonterritoriality of nationalism
167
maintains its relevance as an affective source of identification resistance
178
the
181
orients his political action not only and not principally toward
186
II Citizenship and the ideal of city life21
187
define a pure public space which the citizen enters to
191
publicregarding political engagement motivated not by perceived
195
V Constitutional patriotism and its others
199
VI Conclusion
204
9 Immigrant political integration and ethnic
206
Normative paradigm
207
Table 91 Absolute and relative size of allochtone population in
212
Table 92 Twentyfive principal immigrant ethnic groups in the Netherlands
213
Table 93 Turnout in three Amsterdam municipal elections for
215
Table 94 Various types of political participation
216
N
217
Table 96 Regression analysis political participation
219
Table 97 Degree of ethnic community of ethnic organizations
221
Table 98 Degree of social integration of ethnic organizations in
223
The demosdemocracy puzzle
262
World citizenship
269
Resurrect the border
272
12 Social solidarity as a problem for
285
I Pluralism
287
III Liberalism and belonging6
296
13 The continuing significance of
303
I The nature and justification of ethnocultural rights
304
Accommodationist group rights
307
Autonomist group rights
309
Secessionist minorities and sovereignty
312
II Normative challenges to ethnocultural group rights
313
14 Amnesty or impunity? A preliminary critique
325
Gross violations
330
Before findings could be made clarity was required on definitions
331
the crime
338
Pass laws and coerced labor
344
Farm prison system
345
Interpretation
356
Reconciliation and responsibility
358
VI Conclusion
360
15 Laws races
362
with which leaders came to power Those institutions then do
366
most sharply from those advocating its leading rival the colorblind
380

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About the author (2007)

Seyla Benhabib is Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science and Philosophy and Director of the Program in Ethics, Politics and Economics at Yale University, Connecticut. Her most recent publications include Transformation of Citizenship: Dilemmas of the Nation-State in the Era of Globalization (2000), The Claims of Culture: Equality and Diversity in the Global World (2002) and The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents and Citizens (2004) which won the Ralph Bunche award of the American Political Science Association and the North American Society's best book in Social Philosophy award.

Ian Shapiro is Sterling Professor of Political Science at Yale University, California and Henry R. Luce Director of the Yale Center for International and Area Studies. His most recent publications include The Moral Foundations of Politics (2003), The State of Democratic Theory (2003), The Flight From Reality in the Human Sciences (2005) and Death by a Thousand Cuts: The Fight over Taxing Inherited Wealth (with Michael J. Graetz, 2005).

Danilo Petranovich is a PhD Candidate in Political Science at Yale University, Connecticut. His research focuses on the shaping of American allegiances from the Founding period through the Civil War.

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