Life and Correspondence of John Paul Jones: Including His Narrative of the Campaign of the Liman

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D. Fanshaw, printer, 1830 - 555 pages
 

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Page 481 - Full little knowest thou that hast not tried, What hell it is, in suing long to bide: To lose good days, that might be better spent; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed today, to be put back tomorrow; To feed on hope, to pine with fear and sorrow; To have thy prince's grace, yet want her peers...
Page 34 - And you are to observe and follow such orders and directions from time to time, as you shall receive from this, or a future Congress...
Page 302 - I have the honour to be, with the greatest respect, sir, your most obedient and most humble servant, J. PAUL JONES. Copy of a report of a committee on Captain Paul Jones
Page 177 - When this position took place, it was eight o'clock, previous to which the Bon Homme Richard had received sundry eighteen-pound shots below the water, and leaked very much. My battery of twelve-pounders, on which I had placed my chief dependence, being commanded by Lieutenant Dale and Colonel Weibert, and manned principally with American seamen and French volunteers, was entirely silenced and abandoned. As to the six old eighteen-pounders that formed the battery of the lower gun-deck, they did no...
Page 33 - We, reposing special trust and confidence in your patriotism, valour, conduct, and fidelity, do, by these presents constitute and appoint you to be General and Commander in Chief of the army of the United Colonies...
Page 34 - States, or any other your superior officer, according to the rules and discipline of war, in pursuance of the trust reposed in you.
Page 181 - ... became gloomy indeed. I would not, however, give up the point. The enemy's mainmast began to shake, their firing decreased fast, ours rather increased, and the British colours were struck at half an hour past ten o'clock.
Page 177 - Richard, gained thereby several times an advantageous situation, in spite of my best endeavors to prevent it. As I had to deal with an enemy of greatly superior force, I was under the necessity of closing with him, to prevent the advantage which he had over me in point of manoeuvre.

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