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heaven with his mighty angels in flaming fire, taking vengeance on them who know not God, and who obey not the gospel of our Lord Jésus Christ, who shall be punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and from the glory of his power, when he shall come to be glorified in his saints, and to be admired in all them who believe."

He then proceeds to exhort the brethren “ by the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ, that they would not be shaken in their minds, or be troubled, as if the day of the Lord was at hand: he begs that they would not be deceived by any means, for that day should not come until there should first come a falling

* The food of infidelity that is prevailing throughout Europe, as well as other parts of the world, may justly be considered as a manifest fulfilment of the prophetic declarations of the apostles of Christ, and one of the alarming signs of the times.-Germany, which was the principal seat of the reformation, has sorely experienced the truth of this prediction. By means of the illuminati and other vain pretenders to philosophy, she has lost much of her taste and relish for those divine traths that so eminently adorned her great men for two ceu turies, and for the support of which, so many have laid down their lives.-" There still are some respectable divines in Germany; but the principles of Eickhorn of Gottingen, with respect to the old testament, which together with Geddes (of Great Britain) his works on the same subject, are gaining fast ground-I will not assert that Eickhorn by lessening the authority of the old testament, meant to undermine that of the pew. But I am fully persuaded and, will positively assert, that if he had that design, he could not possibly have made use of more successful means. Indeed among the most respectable of away,* (of professors) and the man of sin be revealed, the son of perdition, who opposeth and exalteth bimself above all that is called God, or that is worshipped; so that as God, he sitteth in the temple of God, shewing himself that he is God."'

the clergy whom I have seen and heard of, the divine authority and positive institutions of the gospel seem to be entirely left out of the question; and we have instead of the doctrines and precepts of Jesus Christ, elegant dissertations on the beauty of virtue; lofty declamations on humanity, and against the present war with France; and sublime attempts to account for every thing, not by appealing to the Creator, but by abstraet reasoning.–But these writings are so extensive and uniformly dangerous that the consequences to the public must be the same, and therefore it is most devoutly to be wished that all the real lovers, and true philosophers of Germany, would follow the example of Genz, and some few others; and anite in stemming the torrent of false philosophy and revolutionary polities." Apti. Jac. Rev. vi. vol. 571-678.

TIMOTHY.

ST. PAUL chargeth Timothy, “ before God and the Lord Jesus, who shall judge the quick and the dead, at his appearing in his kingdom, that he should keep the commandment that he had given him, without spot and unrebukable, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ, who in his times, he shall show, who is the blessed and only potentate, the king of kings and Lord of Lords.”—He says that “ I have fought a good fight-I have finished my course I have kept the faith, and henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord the righteous judge shall give me at that day, and not to me only, but unto all them also, who love his appearing," and formally concludes his exhortation, “ to the end that his heart might be es. tablished unblamable in holiness before God, even our Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ with all his saints."

THE same apostle asserts, in this epistle to Ti. tus, " that the grace of God has appeared unto all men, teaching us that denying ungodliness and world. ly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously and god. ly in this present world, looking for that blessed hope and the glorious appearing of the great God even our Saviour Jesus Christ.

HEBREWS.

IN the epistle to the Hebrews, the apostle takes ap the principle at large, and connecting the Old and New Testament together, shows it to be the life and spirit of both dispensations, or rather that they were but one dispensation under different modifications, to suit the different advancements and progress of the main object.

He encourages the suffering disciples among the Hebrews, by shewing in a convincing manner the inefficiency and weakness of the law, sacrifices, and he-all sufficiency of the sacrifice of Christ himself to

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away sin and perfect them in holiness. He beseeches them not to suffer their aflictions so to work, as to lead them to cast away their confidence and hope, “ for they had need of patience," which was to be supported and kept up by the assurance, that after having by their sufferings and patience done the will of God," they should inherit the promises”-and he exhorts to great additional comfort arising from the certainty of these promises, “ for yet a little while, and he that is certainly to come (to your relief and everlasting joy) will come, and will not tarry." -And he concludes by assuring them that it is by this faith and hope of his speedily coming, that they were to live from day to day-he then assures them that this faith will be to them the very substance of the things they hoped for, and the evidence of the things they could not at present seemhe then proves it by the example of all the old patriarchs.

But the apostle well knew that he was writing to those who had been already instructed in, and were practising on this general doctrine. That they would fully understand him, although he did not enter into the minutia of the circumstances attending the important facts he was writing on; which might have given great and unnecessary umbrage to the Roman government, especially if it had been convinced that the christians had expected to possess a kingdom righteousness under Jesus Christ in the land of Jadea, to the exclusion of every other power and kingdom of the world.

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