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WHEN THE MORNING FIRST DAWNS. WHEN the morning first dawns, we will seek the green hill,

Before the horn from the peak wakes the plain,

Before the horn from the peak wakes the plain,

And list to the hum of the wild mountains rill,

Or join with pure hearts in the lark's thrilling strain,

Or join with pure hearts in the lark's thrilling strain.

The lark's thrilling strain,

Or join with pure hearts in the lark's thrilling strain,

Hail, hail, the fresh morn, list the chirp of the birds,

Hark the pipe of the shepherd, hark the low of the herds,

While distant and dying sweet echo brings near,

The sound of the horn the village to cheer,

The sound of the horn the village to cheer.

Li ra la li ra la, &c.

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When the first star of evening illumines the sky,

And herds from the hills seek their homes in the vale,

And herds from the hills seek their homes in the vale,

Hand and hand we will roam, the lone rivulet by,

And list to the Nightingale's heart soothing tale,

And list to the Nightingale's heart soothing tale, the Nightingale's tale, And list to the Nightingale's heart soothing tale;

Hail! hail! the calm eve, see each bird flies to rest

See the wife spreads the board, and the hind seeks his rest,

While distant and dying, sweet echo brings near,

The sound of the horn the village to cheer,

The sound of the horn, the village to cheer,

Li ra la li ra la, &c.

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In the days when we went gipsying,

1

A long time ago,

The lads and lasses in their best
Were dress'd from top to toe.
We danced and sung the jocund strain,
Upon the forest green,

And nought but mirth and jollity
Around us could be seen.

And thus we passed the pleasant time,
Nor thought of care or woe,

In the days when we went gipsying,
A long time ago.

All hearts were light and eyes were bright

While Nature's face was gay, The trees their leafy branches spread, And perfumes fill'd sweet May. 'Twas there we heard the cuckoo's

note,

Steal softly through the air, While every scene around us look'd More beautiful and fair.

And thus, &c.

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We filled a glass to every lass,
And friends we loved most dear,
We wish'd them many a happy day
And many a happy year.
To friends away we turned our thoughts,
With feelings kind and free,
And oh, we wish'd them with us there
Beneath the forest tree.

And thus, &c.

FRIENDS, COME DRAW NEAR.

FRIENDS, come draw near and hear the

story,

Of a postillion bold and gay, Tis true indeed, 'tis no vain glory, Take, take my word for all I say; When far his horses tramp was sound

ing,

The village maids came forth to
greet,

Many a heart from them was bounding,
Galloping with his horse's feet.
Oh! oh! oh! oh! how gay and
free,

The happy postillion must be,
Oh! oh! oh oh! how gay and

free,

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How gay and free,
The happy postillion must be!
The happy postillion must be.
How gay and free, gay and free,
The happy postillion e'er must be,
How gay and free, gay and free,
gay and free

The happy postillion e'er must be.

Many a lady high in station,

Whose absent lord, his wife had told, If you do not ride for recreation,

None drives but this postillion bold; His horses promptly obey his will,

When the trusty reins he's seizing, There is perfect safety in his skill, His overturns are not unpleasing. Oh! &c.

Late in the night, the village leaving,
To take some trav'llers on their
way
Home he quitted, many grieving,
At his lengthen'd stay;

No more he roves to ev'ry flower,
His days of gallantry are done,
He that o'er many hearts had power,
Now has become the slave of one.
Oh! &c.

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