Изображения страниц
PDF
EPUB

THE

GEMS OF SONG.

STAR-SPANGLED BANNER

O! SAY, can you see, by the dawn's early light,

What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming,

Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watch'd were so gallantly streaming;

And the rocket's red glare, the bomb's bursting in air,

Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there!

O! say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave

O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave?

On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep,

Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,

What is that which the breeze, o'er the tow'ring steep

As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses ;

Now it catches the gleam of the morn、 ing's first beam,

In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream:

'Tis the star-spangled banner! O, long may it wave

O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore

That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,

A home and a country shall leave us no more?

Their blood has wash'd out their foul footsteps' pollution:

No refuge could save the hireling and

slave

[ocr errors]

~mmun

From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave,

And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave

O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

O! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand

Between their loved home and the war's desolation;

Blest with victory and peace, may the heaven-rescued land

Praise the power that hath made and preserved us a nation!

Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,

And this be our motto-"In God is our trust!"

And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave

O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave!

WOODMAN, SPARE THAT TREE
WOODMAN! spare that tree:

Touch not a single bough:

པ་་

In youth it shelter'd me,
And I'll protect it now.
'Twas my forefather's hand
That placed it near his cot:
There, woodman, let it stand:
Thy axe shall harm it not

That old familiar tree,

Whose glory and renown Are spread o'er land and sea

And wouldst thou hack it down? Woodman! forbear thy stroke:

Cut not its earth-bound ties : Oh! spare that aged oak,

Now towering to the skies When but an idle boy,

I sought its grateful shade, In all their gushing joy

Here, too, my sisters play'd My mother kiss'd me here;

My father press'd my hand-
Forgive this foolish tear,

But let that old oak stand.
My heartstrings round thee cling
Close as thy bark, old friend:
Here shali the wild bird sing,

And still thy branches bend.

Old tree! the storms still brave,
And, woodman, leave the spot:
While I've a hand to save,
Thy axe shall harm it not.

SOME LOVE TO ROAM O'ER THE
DARK SEA FOAM.

SOME love to roam o'er the dark sea foam, Where the shrill wind whistles free; But a chosen band in a mountain land,

And a life in the wood for me.

Where the shrill wind whistles free: But a chosen band in a mountain land, And a life in a wood for me. When morning beams o'er the mountain streams,

Oh! merrily forth we go,

To follow the stag to his slippery crag,
And to chase the bounding roe.
To follow the stag to his slippery crag,
And to chase the bounding roe.
Ho! ho! ho! ho!-ho! ho! ho! ho!
Ho! ho! ho! ho! ho! ho! ho'

The deer we mark through the forest. dark, And the prowling wolf we track;

« ПредыдущаяПродолжить »