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" Twenty-seven names make up the first story, and the recorded names ever since contain not one living century. The number of the dead long exceedeth all that shall live. The night of time far surpasseth the day; and who knows when was the equinox ? Every... "
The Quarterly Review - Page 346
edited by - 1819
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The Writing and Reading of Verse

Clarence Edward Andrews - 1918 - 327 pages
...occasionally rime. An analysis of one more sentence from Urn Burial will show these characteristics: And since death 'must be the Lucina of life, and even...longest sun sets at right descensions, and makes but whiter arches, and therefore it cannot be long before we lie down in darkness, and have our light in...
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Hydriotaphia

Sir Thomas Browne - 1922 - 146 pages
...^Equinox? Every houre addes unto .that fcurrefttr?tnthmetique. fwEct)fr scarce stands one moment. AndTsince death must be the Lucina of life, and even Pagans could doubt whether thus to live, were to die;^Since^ur longest Sun sets at right descensions, and makes but winter arches, and therefore it...
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Elbert Hubbard's Scrap Book: Containing the Inspired and Inspiring ...

Elbert Hubbard - 1923 - 228 pages
...The night of time far surpasseth the day, and who knows when was the Equinox? Every hour adds unto that current arithmetic, which scarce stands one moment....descensions, and makes but winter arches, and therefore it can not be long before we lie down in darkness and have our light in ashes; since the brother of Death...
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Elbert Hubbard's Scrap Book: Containing the Inspired and Inspiring ...

Elbert Hubbard - 1923 - 228 pages
...The night of time far surpasseth the day, and who knows when was the Equinox? Every hour adds unto that current arithmetic, which scarce stands one moment....descensions, and makes but winter arches, and therefore it can not be long before we lie down in darkness and have our light in ashes; since the brother of Death...
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The Literary Essay in English

Eleanore (Sister Mary) - 1923 - 260 pages
...his faultless style and, more particularly, his mastery of the sonorous periodic sentence. "And _J since death must be the Lucina of life, and even Pagans could doubt, whether thus to live, were to dye. Since our longest sunne sets at right descensions, and makes but winter arches, and therefore...
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The Oxford Book of English Prose

Arthur Quiller-Couch - 1925 - 1092 pages
...surpas^eth the day, and who knows when was the Equinox? Every hour adds unto that current "Arithmetick, which scarce stands one moment. And since death must be the Lucina of life, and even Pagans 214 could doubt whether thus to live were to die ; Since our longest Sun sets at right descensions,...
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English Prose and Poetry

John Matthews Manly - 1926 - 882 pages
...The night of time far surpasseth the day; and who knows when was the equinox? Every hour adds unto , was the celebrated Petronius, who invented the pleasant...between the sexes, which has been either a point of disp declensions, and makes but winter arches, and therefore it cannot be long before we lie down in darkness,...
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Seventeenth Century Essays: From Bacon to Clarendon

Jacob Zeitlin - 1926 - 346 pages
...The night of time far surpasseth the day, and who knows when was the equinox? Every hour adds unto that current arithmetic which scarce stands one moment....And since death must be the Lucina of life, and even pagans1 could doubt, whether thus to live, were to die; since our longest sun sets at right descensions,...
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Main Currents of English Literature: A Brief Literary History of the English ...

Percy Hazen Houston - 1926 - 520 pages
...The night of time far surpasseth the day, and who knows when was the equinox? Every hour adds unto that current arithmetic, which scarce stands one moment. And since death must be the Lucina of 137 life, and even pagans could doubt whether thus to live were to die; since our longest sun sets...
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Narrative and Meaning in Early Modern England: Browne's Skull and Other ...

Howard Marchitello - 1997 - 229 pages
...discussion of the follies of human ambition for "diuturnity" culminates in Browne's famous crescendo: And since death must be the Lucina of life, and even Pagans could doubt whether thus to live, were to dye. Since our longest Sunne sets at right descensions, and makes but winter arches, and therefore...
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