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" By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon; Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honour by the locks; So he, that doth redeem her thence,... "
King John. King Richard II. King Henry IV, part I-II - Page 247
by William Shakespeare - 1773
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The Spirit of the Public Journals: Being an Impartial Selection of ..., Volume 8

Stephen Jones, Charles Molloy Westmacott - 1805
...the moft frightful contortions and ridiculous grimaces; By Heaven, -mtthinks it were an eafy leap, To pluck bright Honour from the pale-fac'd moon ; Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom line cculd never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned Honour by the locks ; fco lie that could...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Issue 7

William Shakespeare - 1806
...exploit Drives " him beyond the bounds of patience. Hot. By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon; Or...thence, might wear, Without corrival, all her dignities : But out upon this half-fac'd fellowship ! Wor. He apprehends a world of figures here, But not the...
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The Plays of Shakspeare: Printed from the Text of Samuel Johnson ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1807
...great exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. Hot. By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon; Or...thence, might wear, Without corrival, all her dignities: But out upon this half-fac'd fellowship ! Wor. He apprehends a world of figures here, But not the form...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With Explanatory Notes ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, Samuel Ayscough - 1807
...bounds of patience. Hot. By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from tiie pale-fac'd moon; Or dive into the bottom of the deep,...thence, might wear Without corrival, all her dignities: But out upon this half-fac'd fellowship! /for. He apprehends a world of figures here, But not the form...
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“The” Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 9

William Shakespeare - 1807
...heaven, methinks, it wej e an easy leap, To pluck bright honour form the pale-fac'd moon ; Or dive inio the bottom of the deep, "Where fathom-line could never...pluck up drowned honour by the locks; So he, that dolh redeem her thence, might wear ' Without coirival, all her dignities : fiui . upon this hiilf fac'd...
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The British Theatre; Or, A Collection of Plays: Which are Acted at the ...

Mrs. Inchbald - 1808
...great exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. Hot. By Heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon ;...thence, might wear, Without corrival, all her dignities: — But out upon this half-fac'd fellowship ! Hot. I cry you mercy. Wor. Those same noble Scots, That...
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King Henry IV.: The First[-second] Part ... in Five Acts

William Shakespeare - 1808
...great exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. Hot. By Heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon; Or...thence, might wear, Without corrival, all her dignities: — But out upon this half-fac'd fellowship ! Wor. He apprehends a world of figures here, But not the...
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The British Theatre; Or, A Collection of Plays: Which are Acted at the ...

Mrs. Inchbald - 1808
...great exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. Hot. By Heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon; Or...honour by the locks ; So he, that doth redeem her thmce, might wear, Without corrival. all her dignities: — But out upon this half-tac'd fellowship...
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Hecuba. Orestes. Phoenician damsels. Medea. Hippolytus. Alcestis. Andromache

Euripides - 1809
...in the first part of Shakespeare's Henry the Fourth, " By heav'n methinks it \vcre an easie leap, " To pluck bright Honour from the pale-fac'd moon, ." Or dive into the bottom of the deep, " Where fadom-line could never touch the ground, " And pluck up drowned Honour by the locks, " So he that could...
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1810
...; (7) The -ynker-rose is the do^-rose, the flower of the Cynosbaton. STEE(8) For disdainful. JOHNS. Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line...thence, might wear, Without corrival, all her dignities : But out upon this half-fac'd fellowship ! IVor. He apprehends a world of figures here,' But not the...
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