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" By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon; Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honour by the locks; So he, that doth redeem her thence,... "
King John. King Richard II. King Henry IV, part I-II - Page 247
by William Shakespeare - 1773
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The Works of Shakspeare: From the Text of Johnson, Steevens, and Reed

William Shakespeare - 1825 - 896 pages
...exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. //c/. By heaven, metbinlu, it were an easy leap, nd, He is @ np drowned honour by the locks; So he, that doth redeem her thence, might wear, Without corrival, all...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text by G. Steevens ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1826
...great exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. Hot. By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon ;...thence, might wear, Without corrival, all her dignities : But out upon this half-fac'd fellowship ! 5 Wor. He apprehends a world of figures here, 6 disdain'd...
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Cumberland's British Theatre: With Remarks, Biographical and ..., Volume 4

1826
...exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. Hat. (R.) By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon ;...thence, might wear, Without corrival, all her dignities: — But out upon this half-fac'd fellowship ! War. (R.) He apprehends a world of figures here, Rut...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Richard II. Henry IV, pt. 1-2 ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...great exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. Hot. By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon ; Or dive into the bottom of the deep 1J, 16 ie disdainful. 17 Warburton observes that Euripides has put the same sentiment into'the mouth...
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King Richard II. King Henry IV, part 1. King Henry IV, part 2. Henry V

William Shakespeare - 1826
...great exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. Hot. By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon ; Or dive into the bottom of the deep ir, 16 ie disdainful. 17 \Varburton observes that Euripides has put the same sentiment into the mouth...
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Shakespeare's Styles: Essays in Honour of Kenneth Muir

Philip Edwards - 2004 - 256 pages
...patience. Hotspur. By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon; Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line...thence might wear Without corrival all her dignities. (I, iii, 195-207) His uncle Worcester rightly accuses Hotspur of forgetting sense in rhetoric: He apprehends...
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Villainous Company: A Play for Three Actors Adapted from Henry IV and Other ...

Amlin Gray - 1981 - 34 pages
...And Hal, the madcap, Best had look unto his father's crown. By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line...could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honor by the hair! (A whinny is heard from behind the drop.) My horse is come! O let the hours be short...
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The Heroic Idiom of Shakespearean Tragedy

James C. Bulman - 1985 - 254 pages
...3.1.158-59): To pluck bright honor from the pale-fac'd moon, By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line...could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honor by the locks, So he that doth redeem her thence might wear Without corrival all her dignities....
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Four Histories

William Shakespeare - 1994 - 865 pages
...patience. HOTSPUR By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap 200 To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon, Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line...thence might wear Without corrival all her dignities. But out upon this half-faced fellowship! WORCESTER He apprehends a world of figures here, But not the...
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Shakespeare Set Free: Teaching Hamlet, Henry IV

Peggy O'Brien, Folger Shakespeare Library - 1994 - 226 pages
...the bottom of the deep, Where fathom line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honor by the locks, So he that doth redeem her thence might wear Without corrival all her dignities . . . (1.3.206-212) It is between these two extreme conceptions of honor that Hal is finding his own...
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